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  • 1.
    Egerod, Ingrid
    et al.
    Köpenhamns universitet.
    Granberg, Anetteh
    Sjukhuset i Halmstad.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Henricson, Maria
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Storlie, Sissel
    Universitetet i Trömsö.
    The patient experience of intensive care: a meta-synthesis of Nordic studies.2015In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 1354-1361Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Friberg, Febe
    et al.
    Andersson, EP
    Bengtsson, J
    Pedagogical encounters between nurses and patients in a medical ward: a field study2007In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 534-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patient teaching is regarded as an important aspect of nursing care as well as an essential part of the nursing profession. In nursing practice, a distinction can be made between formal (planned) and informal (spontaneous) patient teaching. The major part of patient teaching research is within the area of formal teaching. In spite of the fact that spontaneous teaching occurs in everyday nursing practice, there is a lack of knowledge in this area. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to illuminate pedagogical dimensions in nursing situations and informal teaching. DESIGN: The study is a fieldwork study within the frames of a life-world phenomenological tradition. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Fifteen registered nurses in a general medical ward of a university hospital in Sweden were followed in their daily work with patients. Twelve patients suffering from various chronic diseases were interviewed. METHODS: The observations comprised a total of 173 h on 34 separate occasions. Informal dialogues with nurses were carried through. Further, formal interviews were conducted with 12 of the observed patients. The data were analysed by means of a life-world phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Two different pedagogical encounters are presented: "Players in different field pedagogical encounters", in which there is a breakdown in the pedagogical dialogue, and "Players in same field pedagogical encounters", in which the pedagogical dialogue develops. Patients' experiences of seeking and acquiring knowledge within these two types of encounter are characterised as "worry" versus "preparedness". Patients' dignity is either threatened or supported, depending on the type of encounter. CONCLUSIONS: Health care organisations have to create a pedagogical climate where "Same field pedagogical encounters" can be created. The nurse has to view the patient as a learning person in order to help the patient to achieve "preparedness". "Preparedness" is described as a cognitive-emotive-existential state and emphasised as an important goal of patient teaching.

  • 3. Galvin, Kathleen
    et al.
    Emami, Azita
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Rosser, Elisabeth
    Powell, Jane
    Bach, Shirley
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Bondas, Terese
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth
    Challenges for future caring science research: a response to Hallberg (2006)2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 971-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a direct and somewhat provocative editorial in IJNS (43) pp. 923–927, Hallberg (2006) raises several challenges for nursing research if it is to provide useful evidence for health-care practice in both the short and the long term. We wish to offer a response to Hallberg’s challenges and to add support to her general call. In particular we wish to consider the challenges she poses in the wider context of caring science rather than the more limited perspective of nursing science. In the spirit of constructive debate we counter some of the claims made and indicate some areas for future direction which embrace a more epistemologically sound view of knowledge generation, which is methodologically sensitive to different research questions. This direction we believe is at the heart of what caring and nursing science is about.

  • 4. Johansson, K.
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    A lifeworld phenomenological study of the experience of falling ill with diabetes2009In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Josefsson, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Competence development of registered nurses in municipal elderly care in Sweden: A questionnaire survey2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 428-441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Josefsson, Karin
    Registered nurses’ education and their views on competence development in municipal elderly care in Sweden: A questionnaire survey2007In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 245-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Josefsson, Karin
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Work situation of registered nurses in municipal elderly care in Sweden: A questionnaire survey2007In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Lévesque, Louise
    et al.
    Ducharme, Francine
    Caron, Chantal
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nolan, Janet
    Nolan, Mike
    A partnership approach to service needs assessment with family caregivers of an aging relative living at home: A qualitative analysis of the experiences of caregivers and practitioners2010In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 876-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background As the global population ages, support for family caregivers who provide the bulk of care to community-dwelling older people is becoming ever more important. However, in many countries, homecare-service practitioners currently do not follow a systematic approach to assessing and responding to caregiver needs. Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of caregivers and practitioners who took part in a field test of the Family Caregivers Support Agreement (FCSA) tool, a modified version of the Carers Outcome Agreement Tool (COAT) initially developed as the result of an Anglo-Swedish study. Both the COAT and the FCSA are designed to facilitate partnerships between caregivers and practitioners so that needs assessment and subsequent support services are negotiated and agreed so as to meet caregiver expectations. Design and participants A qualitative design was adopted and data were collected through focus groups with six practitioners (nurses and social workers) working in two Local Community Service Centres in the province of Quebec (Canada). These practitioners had previously completed the FCSA tool with 17 primary caregivers of frail elderly relatives who were clients of homecare services. Individual interviews were conducted with the caregivers to explore their experiences. Data were analyzed to identify significant themes, from the perspectives of caregivers and practitioners, which provided insights into their experiences and the strategies used by practitioners to facilitate partnership working. Findings To facilitate meaningful exchanges, practitioners adopted strategies such as sensitive listening and the use of enabling questions to identify and contextualize caregiver needs and to highlight the ability of caregivers to find their own creative solutions to the challenges they face. The caregivers described experiencing a climate of trust that allowed them to express their concerns, to reflect upon their situation and to participate in the development of an action plan for their support. Conclusions The study reaffirms findings from Sweden and UK that the use of a tool such as the FCSA enhances partnership working and creates a caregiver–practitioner relationship based on a genuine alliance. As a result, both parties gain new insights into the caring situation. The approach underpinning the FCSA tool has potential for a more widespread application in different contexts.

  • 9.
    Nyström, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Non-Caring Encounters at an Emergency Care Unit: A Lifeworld Hermeneutic Analysis of an Efficience Driven Organization2003In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 761-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse and describe non-caring encounters at an emergency care unit (ECU). The research approach was life-world hermeneutics, and the research question was: what are the conditions leading to non-caring encounters at an ECU? Nine nurses and nine patients were interviewed. The interpretative analysis reveals an adaptation to organisational demands for efficiency, on the part of both nurses and patients. This form of adaptation seems to constitute a precondition for a well-functioning ECU. Furthermore, a comparison with a study of the intersubjective aspects of caring for aggressive patients reveals unexpected similarities: the carers are absent in both contexts. In nursing education and ECU-practice caring competence must thus include capacity to be present when patients express their needs worries and questions about care.

  • 10. Strömgren, Marcus
    et al.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    Bergman, David
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Social capital among healthcare professionals: A prospective study of its importance for job satisfaction, work engagement and engagement in clinical improvements.2016In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Social capital can be an important resource to facilitate the needed improvements in quality of care and efficiency in hospitals.

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the importance of social capital (recognition, vertical trust, horizontal trust and reciprocity) for job satisfaction, work engagement and engagement in clinical improvements.

    DESIGN: A prospective cohort design was used.

    SETTINGS: Intensive care units and emergency, surgical and medical units at five Swedish hospitals with ongoing development of their processes of care.

    PARTICIPANTS: Healthcare professionals (physicians, registered nurses, assistant nurses) at five Swedish midsize hospitals.

    METHODS: The participants answered a questionnaire at two occasions, NN=1602 at baseline and NN=1548 at one-year follow-up. Mean hospital response rate was 53% at baseline and 59% at follow-up. Univariate, multivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed, and the prospective analysis was based on 477 respondents.

    RESULTS: Social capital was associated with healthcare professionals' general work engagement and job satisfaction. Analysis showed positive associations between all measured aspects of social capital and engagement in clinical improvements of patient safety and quality of care. The prospective analysis showed that increased social capital predicted increased job satisfaction, work engagement and engagement in clinical improvements of patient safety.

    CONCLUSION: Social capital is strongly related to job satisfaction and active engagement with clinical improvements. The findings contribute to a deeper knowledge of social capital as a predictive factor that influences patient safety and health among healthcare staff.

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