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  • 1.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Knutsson, S
    Huus, K
    Enskar, K
    The everyday life of the young child shortly after receiving a cancer diagnosis2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: Providing qualified, evidence-based healthcare to children requires increased knowledge of how cancer affects the young child's life. There is a dearth of research focusing on the young child's experience of everyday life. OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of this study was to explore young children's and their parents' perceptions of how cancer affects the child's health and everyday life shortly after diagnosis. METHODS:: Thirteen children with newly diagnosed cancer aged 1 to 6 years and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden, participated in this study through semistructured interviews. Child and parent data were analyzed as a family unit, using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS:: Everyday life was spent at hospital or at home waiting to go back to hospital. Analysis led to the following categories: feeling like a stranger, feeling powerless, and feeling isolated. CONCLUSIONS:: The child wants to be seen as a competent individual requiring information and participation in care. Parents need to be a safe haven for their child and not feel forced to legitimize painful and traumatic procedures by assisting with them. Nurses play a major role in the lives of children. Research with and on the young child is necessary and a way of making them visible and promoting their health and well-being. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:: Nurses need to reevaluate the newly diagnosed child's care routines so as to shift focus from the illness to the child. This requires competent nurses, secure in their caring role.

  • 2. Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Browall, Maria
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Danielson, Ella
    Udo, Camilla
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Björk, Maria
    Ek, Kristina
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Strang, Susann
    The Swedish version of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying scale: aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes.2014In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language.

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients.

    METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used.

    RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

  • 3.
    Högberg, Karin
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Stockelberg, Dick
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Broström, Anders
    The meaning of web-based support: from the patients' perspective within a hematological healthcare setting.2015In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 145-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Being critically ill with a hematological disease is a challenge, sometimes causing a need for support in the adjustment to the stressful life situation. By providing Web-based communication for support from a nurse, patients get access to an alternative and untraditional way to communicate their issues. Objective: The aim was to describe the meaning of using Web-based communication for support from a patient perspective. Methods: A comprehensive randomized pilot study (n = 30) was conducted, allowing 15 patients in the experimental group to have access to the Web-based communication, to evaluate feasibility. Of these 15 participants, 10 were interviewed, focusing on their experiences. An empirical hermeneutical approach was used and the interpretive analysis focused on the meanings. Results: Web-based communication for support means a space for patients to have their say, consolidation of a matter, an extended caring relationship, access to individual medical assessment, and an opportunity for emotional processing. The main interpretation indicates that the patient's influence on the communication strengthens according to the asynchronous, faceless, and written communication. The increased, and in some sense constant, access to an individual medical and caring assessment, in turn, implies a feeling of safety. Conclusion: Web-based communication for support seems to have the potential to enhance patients' participation on their own terms. Implications for Practice: To achieve the possible advantages of Web-based communication for support, nurses must acquire knowledge about caring writing. It requires respect for the patient and articulated accuracy and attention in the response given.

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