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  • 1.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindholm, Maria
    Pettersson, Margareta
    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nurses competencies in Home health care: An interview study.2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Nurses working in Home health care (HHC) are facing major challenges when more advanced care and treatment are performing in the patient's home. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses experiencing their competencies in HHC. 

    Methods:This study has a qualitative and explorative design. Ten nurses were interviewed and data were analysed by content analysis.

    Results:The themes “Being a capable nurse”, “Being a useful nurse” and “Being a subordinate and dependent nurse” were identified. Nurses want to be capable to take care of patients, develop their competencies and perform their duties in the way that are requested. They also want to be useful in their work and providing good and safe HHC. Finally, nurses want to improve the care in HHC with their competencies. Simultaneously, they are subordinate and dependent in the relation with their manager and manager's interest to encourage nurses’ competence development.

    Conclusions:Nurses in HHC are responsible for many seriously ill patients and they want to contribute to a good and safe patient care. To maintain patient safety, reduce the risk for burnout and staff turnover as well as to contribute to a sustainable development of the work, strategies for transfer competencies between nurses and efforts for competence development are needed. 

  • 2.
    Israelsson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, .
    Lilja, Gisela
    Lund University.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Stevenson-Ågren, Jean
    University of Sheffield.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University.
    Post cardiac arrest care and follow-up in Sweden – a national survey2016In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Recent decades have shown major improvements in survival rates after cardiac arrest. However, few interventions have been tested in order to improve the care for survivors and their family members. In many countries, including Sweden, national guidelines for post cardiac arrest care and follow-up programs are not available and current practice has not previously been investigated. The aim of this survey was therefore to describe current post cardiac arrest care and follow-up in Sweden.

    Methods

    An internet based questionnaire was sent to the resuscitation coordinators at all Swedish emergency hospitals (n = 74) and 59 answers were received. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive statistics and free text responses were analysed using manifest content analysis.

    Results

    Almost half of the hospitals in Sweden (n = 27, 46 %) have local guidelines for post cardiac arrest care and follow-up. However, 39 % of them reported that these guidelines were not always applied. The most common routine is a follow-up visit at a cardiac reception unit. If the need for neurological or psychological support are discovered the routines are not explicit. In addition, family members are not always included in the follow-up.

    Conclusions

    Although efforts are already made to improve post cardiac arrest care and follow-up, many hospitals need to focus more on this part of cardiac arrest treatment. In addition, evidence-based national guidelines will have to be developed and implemented in order to achieve a more uniform care and follow-up for survivors and their family members. This national survey highlights this need, and might be helpful in the implementation of such guidelines.

  • 3.
    Rydström, Ingela
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dalheim Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    Importance of social capital at the workplace for return to work among women with a history of long-term sick leave: a cohort study.2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, ISSN ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 14, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The workplace is an essential source of social capital for many people; it provides mutual support and gives meaning to life. However, few prospective studies have thoroughly investigated the importance of aspects of social capital in the workplace. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between aspects of social capital (social support, sense of community, and quality of leadership) at the workplace, and work ability, working degree, and vitality among women with a history of long-term sick leave from human service organizations.

    Methods

    A longitudinal cohort study was performed among women with a history of long-term sick leave. The study started in 2005, and the women were followed up at 6 months, 1 year, and 6 years using self-reported questionnaires (baseline n = 283). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of prospective degree of work ability, working degree, and vitality. Analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were social support, sense of community, and quality of leadership and time.

    Results

    Social capital in terms of quality of leadership (being good at solving conflicts and giving high priority to job satisfaction), sense of community (co-operation between colleagues) and social support (help and support from immediate superiors and colleagues) increased the women’s work ability score (WAS) as well as working degree over time. Additionally, social capital in terms of quality of leadership increased the women’s vitality score over time.

    Conclusions

    A sustainable return-to-work process among individuals with a history of long-term sick leave, going in and out of work participation, could be supported with social support, good quality of leadership, and a sense of community at the workplace. The responsibility for the rehabilitation process can not be reduced to an individual problem, but ought to include all stakeholders involved in the process, such as managers, colleagues, health care services, and the social security agency.

  • 4.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Holmberg, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson, Henrik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Possible effects of a course in cardiovascular nursing on prehospital care of patients experiencing suspected acute coronary syndrome: a cluster randomised controlled trial2016In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, no 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Current research suggests that nurses can influence the outcome for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study has been to evaluate whether a course in cardiovascular nursing (CVN) can improve ambulance nurses’ (ANs’) prehospital care of patients experiencing suspected ACS, related to pain intensity.

    Methods

    This is a cluster randomised controlled trial that was conducted in the ambulance services. Patients were allocated to one of two groups: in the first group, patients were treated by ANs who had attended the CVN course and in the second group patients were treated by ANs without this qualification. Inclusion criteria were: 1/pain raising suspicion of ACS, and 2/pain score ≥4 on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The primary outcome was the estimated intensity of pain or discomfort according to VAS 15 min after randomisation. Secondary outcomes were estimated intensity of pain or discomfort on admission to hospital and further requirement of pain treatment, as well as symptoms such as paleness and/or cold sweat; nausea and/or vomiting; anxiety, dyspnea, degree of alertness, respiratory depression and aggressiveness. A further secondary outcome measured was survival to 30 days. Lastly, a final diagnosis was made. A total of 38 ANs attended the CVN course. There were 1,747 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria.

    Results

    The pain score did not differ significantly between the two groups fifteen minutes after randomisation (median value of VAS was 4.0 in both groups). On admission to hospital the pain score was significantly lower for patients treated by an AN who had attended the CVN course (n = 332) compared with those treated by an AN who had not attended the course (n = 1,415) (median 2.5 and 3.0 respectively, p = 0.001). The ANs who had attended the course used higher doses of morphine.

    Conclusions

    An educational intervention with a CVN course did not relate significantly to more efficient pain relief in suspected ACS during the first 15 min. However, this intervention was associated with more effective pain relief later on in the prehospital setting. Thus, a CVN course for ANs appears to be associated with reduced pain intensity among patients experiencing suspected ACS. This result needs however to be confirmed in further trials.

    Trial registration

    The ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System (registration number NCT00792181).

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