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  • 1.
    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi Province, Yangling, 712100, China.
    Amobonye, Ayodeji
    Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, P O Box 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa.
    Bhagwat, Prashant
    Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, P O Box 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa.
    Ashokkumar, Veeramuthu
    Center for Waste Management and Renewable Energy, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Saveetha University, Chennai, 600077, India.
    Gowd, Sarath C.
    Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Engineering and Sciences, SRM University, Andhra Pradesh, India.
    Dregulo, Andrei Mikhailovich
    National Research University “Higher School of Economics”, 17 Promyshlennaya str, Saint-Petersburg, 198095, Russian Federation.
    Rajendran, Karthik
    National Research University “Higher School of Economics”, 17 Promyshlennaya str, Saint-Petersburg, 198095, Russian Federation.
    Flora, G.
    Department of Botany, St. Mary's College (Autonomous), Tamil Nadu, India.
    Kumar, Vinay
    Bioconversion and Tissue Engineering (BITE) Laboratory, Department of Community Medicine, Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences (SIMATS), Thandalam, Chennai, 602105, India.
    Pillai, Santhosh
    Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, P O Box 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa.
    Zhang, Zengqiang
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi Province, Yangling, 712100, China.
    Sindhu, Raveendran
    Department of Food Technology, TKM Institute of Technology, Kerala, Kollam, 691 505, India.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Biochemical engineering for elemental sulfur from flue gases through multi-enzymatic based approaches – A review2024In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 914, article id 169857Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flue gases are the gases which are produced from industries related to chemical manufacturing, petrol refineries, power plants and ore processing plants. Along with other pollutants, sulfur present in the flue gas is detrimental to the environment. Therefore, environmentalists are concerned about its removal and recovery of resources from flue gases due to its activation ability in the atmosphere to transform into toxic substances. This review is aimed at a critical assessment of the techniques developed for resource recovery from flue gases. The manuscript discusses various bioreactors used in resource recovery such as hollow fibre membrane reactor, rotating biological contractor, sequential batch reactor, fluidized bed reactor, entrapped cell bioreactor and hybrid reactors. In conclusion, this manuscript provides a comprehensive analysis of the potential of thermotolerant and thermophilic microbes in sulfur removal. Additionally, it evaluates the efficacy of a multi-enzyme engineered bioreactor in this process. Furthermore, the study introduces a groundbreaking sustainable model for elemental sulfur recovery, offering promising prospects for environmentally-friendly and economically viable sulfur removal techniques in various industrial applications. 

  • 2.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Dekhla, Isabelle K.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Bertram, Michael G.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Stockholm University, Monash University.
    Manera, Jack L.
    Monash University.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. University of Gothenburg.
    Anthropogenic noise disrupts early-life development in a fish with paternal care2024In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 935, article id 173055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic noise is a global pollutant but its potential impacts on early life-stages in fishes are largely unknown. Here, using controlled laboratory experiments, we tested for impacts of continuous or intermittent exposure to low-frequency broadband noise on early life-stages of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps), a marine fish with exclusive paternal care. Neither continuous nor intermittent noise exposure had an effect on filial cannibalism, showing that males were capable and willing to care for their broods. However, broods reared in continuous noise covered a smaller area and contained fewer eggs than control broods. Moreover, although developmental rate was the same in all treatments, larvae reared by males in continuous noise had, on average, a smaller yolk sac at hatching than those reared in the intermittent noise and control treatments, while larvae body length did not differ. Thus, it appears that the increased consumption of the yolk sac reserve was not utilised for increased growth. This suggests that exposure to noise in early life-stages affects fitness-related traits of surviving offspring, given the crucial importance of the yolk sac reserve during the early life of pelagic larvae. More broadly, our findings highlight the wide-ranging impacts of anthropogenic noise on aquatic wildlife living in an increasingly noisy world.

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  • 3.
    Gaur, V K
    et al.
    School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, UNIST, Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea, Centre for Energy and Environmental Sustainability, Lucknow, India, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow Campus, Lucknow, India.
    Gautam, K
    Centre for Energy and Environmental Sustainability, Lucknow, India.
    Sharma, P
    Department of Bioengineering, Integral University, Lucknow, India.
    Gupta, P
    Bioscience and Biotechnology Department, Banasthali University, Rajasthan, India.
    Dwivedi, S
    Herbs India Pharma, Lucknow 226017, India.
    Srivastava, J K
    Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Lucknow Campus, Lucknow, India.
    Varjani, S
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 010, India.
    Ngo, H H
    Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia.
    Kim, S H
    School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea.
    Chang, J S
    Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
    Bui, X T
    Faculty of Environment and Natural Resources, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology (HCMUT), Ho Chi Minh City 700000, Viet Nam.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Parra-Saldivar, R
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias-Centro de Biotecnología-FEMSA, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey, Mexico.
    Sustainable strategies for combating hydrocarbon pollution: Special emphasis on mobil oil bioremediation2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 832, article id 155083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global rise in industrialization and vehicularization has led to the increasing trend in the use of different crude oil types. Among these mobil oil has major application in automobiles and different machines. The combustion of mobil oil renders a non-usable form that ultimately enters the environment thereby causing problems to environmental health. The aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fraction of mobil oil has serious human and environmental health hazards. These components upon interaction with soil affect its fertility and microbial diversity. The recent advancement in the omics approach viz. metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics has led to increased efficiency for the use of microbial based remediation strategy. Additionally, the use of biosurfactants further aids in increasing the bioavailability and thus biodegradation of crude oil constituents. The combination of more than one approach could serve as an effective tool for efficient reduction of oil contamination from diverse ecosystems. To the best of our knowledge only a few publications on mobil oil have been published in the last decade. This systematic review could be extremely useful in designing a micro-bioremediation strategy for aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems contaminated with mobil oil or petroleum hydrocarbons that is both efficient and feasible. The state-of-art information and future research

  • 4.
    Mohammadi, Mahtab
    et al.
    Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Iran.
    Mahboobi-Soofiani, Nasrollah
    Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Iran.
    Farhadian, Omidvar
    Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Iran.
    Malekpouri, Pedram
    Young Researchers and Elites Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
    Metabolic and NH4 excretion rate of fresh water species, Chondrostoma regium in response to environmental stressors, different scenarios for temperature and pH2019In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 648, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in water temperature and pH levels have substantial adverse effects on aquatic organisms, hence causing physiological constraint on their well-being. To understand the physiological responses of Chondrostoma regium to temperature or pH changes, standard metabolic rate (SMR), maximum metabolic rate (MMR), absolute and factorial aerobic scope (AS&FAS) as well as the specific rate of ammonia excretion (Jamm) were measured at following temperatures: acute low (3.5–4.5 °C), 24 h low (5.5–6.5 °C), 7 d low (5.5–6.5 °C), acute high (30–31 °C), 24 h high (29–30 °C), 7 d high (28–29 °C), and different pH treatments: acute low (4.3–4.4), 24 h low (4.3–4.4), 7 d low (6.3–6.4), acute high (9.8–9.9), 24 h high (9.8–9.9), 7 d high (8.8–8.9). A control group was also assigned to optimum temperature = 22–23 °C and pH = 7.8–7.9. These experimental ranges for each treatment were obtained based on critical thermal and pH thresholds, i.e., 1.9 to 31.7 °C and 2.7 to 11.1, respectively. SMR was enhanced significantly (P < 0.05) following pH treatments, except for 24 h low pH treatment. Results showed significant (P < 0.05) changes in both SMR and MMR at low and high temperature treatments. The AS was elevated following pH treatments except for acute low pH treatment in which AS significantly was declined (P < 0.05). Low temperature treatments resulted in lower AS while no significant changes in AS were observed in high temperatures. In all treatments, FAS value did not differ significantly from control, except for acute and 24 h low treatments of both temperature and pH. All high pH and temperature treatments showed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in Jamm. Histopathological results of gills indicated hyperplasia and fusion of secondary lamella and kidneys histopathology revealed necrosis and loss of tubular lumen in the most treatments. Results indicated that increases in water temperature or pH are more stressful than the lower ranges of them, suggesting higher capability of fish to adjust to the low levels of temperature or pH.

  • 5.
    Pervez, M. N.
    et al.
    University of Salerno.
    Bilgiç, B.
    Istanbul Technical University.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Uwineza, Clarisse
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zarra, T.
    University of Salerno.
    Belgiorno, V.
    University of Salerno.
    Naddeo, V.
    University of Salerno.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Double-stage membrane-assisted anaerobic digestion process intensification for production and recovery of volatile fatty acids from food waste2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 825, article id 154084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of organic waste streams (i.e., food waste) for the sustainable production of precursor chemicals such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs) using anaerobic digestion (AD) has received significant attention in the present days. AD-derived VFAs have great market appeal if the challenges with their recovery and purification from the complex AD effluent is overcome. In this study, a microfiltration immersed membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used for the production of VFAs from food waste and simultaneously in-situ recovery of VFAs. The MBR set-up was applied for 98 days, with a maximum yield of 0.2 gVFA/gVSadded at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 4 g VS/L/d. The recovered permeate was then subjected to further purification using a side stream ultrafiltration unit. It was found that the removal rates of total solids (TS), total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved solids (DS), volatile solids (VS) and volatile suspended solids (VSS) were above 70–80% in both membranes (10 kDa and 50 kDa), and Phosphorus (P), Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and NH4+-N were also removed partially. Particularly, VFAs concentration (above 6 g/L) was higher for 10 kDa at pH 5.4 in ultrafiltered solution and permeate flux decline was higher for 10 kDa at pH 5.4. These results are also supported by the measurement of UV–Vis spectra of the solution and visual appearance, providing a promising approach towards building a VFAs-based platform. © 2022 Elsevier B.V.

  • 6.
    Pervez, Md. Nahid
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Uwineza, Clarisse
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zarra, T
    Sanitary Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Belgiorno, V
    Sanitary Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Naddeo, V
    Sanitary Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Factors influencing pressure-driven membrane-assisted volatile fatty acids recovery and purification: A review2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 817Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are building block chemicals that can be produced through bioconversion of organic waste streams via anaerobic digestion as intermediate products. Purified VFAs are applicable in a wide range of industrial applications such as food, textiles, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals etc. production. The present review focuses on VFAs recovery methods and technologies such as adsorption, distillation, extraction, gas stripping, esterification and membrane based techniques etc., while presenting a discussion of their pros and cons. Moreover, a great attention has been given to the recovery of VFAs through membrane filtration as a promising sustainable clarification, fractionation and concentration approach. In this regard, a thorough overview of factors affecting membrane filtration performance for VFAs recovery has been presented. Filtration techniques such as nanofiltration and reverse osmosis have shown to be capable of recovering over 90% of VFAs content from organic effluent steams, proving the direct effect of membrane materials/surface chemistry, pore size and solution pH in recovery success level. Overall, this review presents a new insight into challenges and potentials of membrane filtration for VFAs recovery based on the effects of factors such as operational parameters, membrane properties and effluent characteristics.

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  • 7.
    Sar, Taner
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Harirchi, Sharareh
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ramezani, M
    Microorganisms Bank, Iranian Biological Resource Centre (IBRC), ACECR, Tehran, Iran.
    Bulkan, Gülru
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Akbas, M Y
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Technical University, Gebze-Kocaeli 41400, Turkey.
    Pandey, A
    CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, India.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Potential utilization of dairy industries by-products and wastes through microbial processes: A critical review2022In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 810Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dairy industry generates excessive amounts of waste and by-products while it gives a wide range of dairy products. Alternative biotechnological uses of these wastes need to be determined to aerobic and anaerobic treatment systems due to their high chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels and rich nutrient (lactose, protein and fat) contents. This work presents a critical review on the fermentation-engineering aspects based on defining the effective use of dairy effluents in the production of various microbial products such as biofuel, enzyme, organic acid, polymer, biomass production, etc. In addition to microbial processes, techno-economic analyses to the integration of some microbial products into the biorefinery and feasibility of the related processes have been presented. Overall, the inclusion of dairy wastes into the designed microbial processes seems also promising for commercial approaches. Especially the digestion of dairy wastes with cow manure and/or different substrates will provide a positive net present value (NPV) and a payback period (PBP) less than 10 years to the plant in terms of biogas production.

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  • 8.
    Wang, Yuanji
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China.
    Liu, Li
    Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Apple, College of Horticulture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China.
    Yang, Jianfeng
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China.
    Duan, Yumin
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China.
    Luo, Yu
    Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Li, Yongfu
    Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Carbon Cycling in Forest Ecosystems and Carbon Sequestration, Zhejiang A & F University, Hangzhou 311300, China.
    Li, Huike
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China.
    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China.
    Zhao, Zhengyang
    Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Apple, College of Horticulture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China.
    The diversity of microbial community and function varied in response to different agricultural residues composting2020In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial activities are the dynamic core in the soil nutrient cycle. To improve the knowledges about the responses of soil microbial community structure and potential function to long-term cover crops practice. The co-occurrence patterns of soil microbial community structure and functional genes were evaluated using 16SrRNA, ITS and metagenomic technique in 13 years cover crops of orchard grass (OG, Dactylis glomerata L.) with high C/N and white clover (WC, Trifolium repens L.) with low C/N. Conventional tillage (CT) was control. The experiment was implemented in an apple orchard located on the Loess Plateau, China, from 2006 to 2018. We also measured soil physicochemical properties and enzyme activities related to carbon and nitrogen cycling. The conclusions showed that the dominant bacterial phyla were Actinobacteria 27.68% in OG treatment and Proteobacteria 25.89% in WC treatment. Organic matter inputs stimulated growth of the phyla of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Ascomycota and genera of Bacillus, Blastococcus, Streptomyces and Penicillium. Interestingly, the OG and WC treatments promoted the fungal and bacterial alpha-diversity compared to CT treatment, respectively. In addition, compared to CT treatment, OG treatment was beneficial to the increase of C-cycle enzyme activity, while WC treatment tended to increase the N-cycle enzyme activity. Notably, compared to CT treatment, they both enriched carbon fixation and cycle pathways genes, while WC treatment increased the nitrogen metabolism pathway genes. Moreover, OG treatment was more conducive to the enrichment of carbohydrate enzymes genes involved in the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose compared to WC treatment. Overall, different quality of plant residues stimulated the specific expressions of soil microbial community structure and function. Long-term planted white clover was effective strategy to improve soil quality. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.

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