Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Adriansson, C
    et al.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bergbom, I
    The use of topical anaesthesia at children's minor lacerations: an experimental study2004In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 74-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In a great many situations within health care and treatment, children are subjected to unnecessary pain and suffering. When local anaesthetics is to be administered the child can experience this as incomprehensible especially when the nursing staff assures the child that no pain would be felt, only to discover soon after, that it actually did hurt at the moment of anaesthetic infiltration. The soothing of pain during the suturing of wounds in emergency wards can be reduced, ensuring that unnecessary pain in the cafe-and-treatment process is mot meted out to children. In order to prevent this (subjection to unnecessary pain), and by improving accepted practice, it was interesting to investigate whether children felt pain at the time of infiltration anaesthesia following the initial topical anaesthesia. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of introductory topical anaesthesia using Xylocain solution dropped in the wound prior to a definitive infiltration-anaesthesia. An experimental, prospective design was used where children were included in either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group (n=10) were given a Xylocain solution while the control group (n=10) received physiological Sodium solution. Data collection for the study was made by making VAS estimates and by interviews. Result: The study shows that a certain alleviation of pain does occur when using Xylocain but no statistically significant difference exists between the two groups. Irrespective of whether the children received an introductory topical anaesthesia with Xylocain or Sodium solution at the time of infiltration anaesthesia, they expressed pain in connection with infiltration. The study also shows that many children express fear and anxiety. Conclusion: Current research highlights the difficulties involved in offering children a really satisfactory form of pain relief in connection with infiltration anaesthesia and suturing of wounds. It is urgent to throw more light on children’s pain, both from a nursing and from a medical point of view. No statistically significant difference was found in children’s reported pain, after treatment with Xylocain but the solution can have a positive effect at the time of the infiltration jab, but a larger study needs to be done in order to establish this firmly.

  • 2.
    Ahl, Caroline
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    To Handle the Unexpected: The meaning of caring in pre-hospital emergency care2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient’s voice has not been present to the same degree as the professional perspective in caring research in a pre-hospital context. In order to further develop and improve pre-hospital care, it is therefore important to explore patients’ situations not only in life threatening but also in non-traumatic situations. This is especially important as these patients might be defined as inappropriate attendees of ambulance services. The aim of this study was to interpret and explain experiences of caring in pre-hospital care situations that are not defined as traumatic or life threatening. Twenty informants aged between 34 and 82 years were interviewed. The design of the study was exploratory, and it used an interpretative approach in order to understand the meaning of pre-hospital caring. The findings show that pre-hospital caring can be understood and explained as a matter of interplay between carer(s) and patient with potentials for positive as well as negative outcomes. Our conclusion is that the initial meeting is of vital importance in how patients experience pre-hospital care. It is suggested that general public information on the development of Swedish pre-hospital care received in turn may facilitate the first encounter between patient and carer(s).

  • 3.
    Ahl, Caroline
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jansson, L
    Making up one’s mind: Patients Experiences of Calling an Ambulance2006In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of the inappropriate use of ambulance transport and care has mainly been studied from the professionals’ and caregivers’ perspective, with few studies focusing on the patient and his/her experiences. To further understand whether patients use ambulance care in an inappropriate manner and, if so, why, it is important to obtain an overall picture of the patients’ existential situation at the time they call an ambulance. The aim of this study was to analyse and describe patients’ experiences related to the decision to call an ambulance and the wait for it to arrive. The design was explorative, and twenty informants aged between 34 and 82 years were interviewed. Qualitative content analyses were performed. The findings showed that calling for an ambulance is a major decision that is preceded by hesitation and attempts to handle the situation by oneself. Our conclusion is that the definition of inappropriate use of valuable health care resources should not be based solely on the professionals’ point of view but also take account of the patients’ reactions when they experience a threat to their life and health.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jakobsson, E
    Furåker, C
    Nilsson, K
    The everyday work at a Swedish emergency department: The practitioners’ perspective2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 58-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the everyday work at emergency departments (EDs), the patients being cared for have different needs and perceived symptoms. To meet their need for emergency care, knowledge of the work is important. The aim of this study is to explore the everyday work at a Swedish ED from a practitioner’s perspective. Method This study has a qualitative, exploratory design with observations and interviews at two EDs. Data were analysed by content analysis. Findings The everyday work is characterised by a rapid, short and standardised encounter with limited scope to provide individualised care, which leads to a mechanical approach. It is also characterised by an adaptive approach in which practitioners strive to be adaptable by structuring everyday work and cooperation to achieve a good workflow. Conclusions The study shows that the practitioners’ encounter with patients and relatives is rapid and of limited duration. The care activities that practitioners mainly perform comprise standard medical management and are performed more mechanically than in a caring way. The practitioners strive to balance the requirements and the realisation of the everyday work through structures and in cooperation with other practitioners, although they work more in parallel than in integrated teams.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ullgren, Andreas
    Holmberg, Mats
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Acute coronary syndrome in relation to the occurrence of associatedsymptoms: A quantitative study in prehospital emergency care2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 33, p. 43-47-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Acute chest pain is a common symptom among prehospital emergency care patients.Therefore, it is crucial that ambulance nurses (ANs) have the ability to identify symptoms and assesspatients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim of this study is to explore the occurrenceof dyspnoea and nausea and/or vomiting in the prehospital phase of a suspected ACS and the associationswith patients’ outcome.

    Methods: This study has a quantitative design based on data from hospital records and from a previousinterventional study (randomised controlled trial) including five Emergency Medical Service (EMS) systemsin western Sweden in the years 2008–2010.

    Results: In all, 1836 patients were included in the interventional study. Dyspnoea was reported in 38%and nausea and/or vomiting in 26% of patients. The risk of death within one year increased with the presenceof dyspnoea. The presence of nausea and/or vomiting increased the likelihood of a final diagnosis ofacute myocardial infarction (AMI).

    Conclusion: This study shows that dyspnoea, nausea and/or vomiting increase the risk of death and seriousdiagnosis among ACS patients. This means that dyspnoea, nausea and/or vomiting should influencethe ANs’ assessment and that special education in cardiovascular nursing is required.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Jakobsson Ung, Eva
    Competencies in Swedish emergency departments: The practitioners’ and managers’ perspective2014In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The task of emergency departments (EDs) is to provide safe emergency healthcare while adopting a caring, cost-effective approach. Patients attending EDs have different medical and caring needs and it is assumed that practitioners have the requisite competencies to meet those needs. The aim of the present study is to explore what kind of competencies practitioners and managers describe as necessary for the practitioners to perform their everyday work in EDs. Methods: This study used a qualitative, exploratory design. Interviews were conducted in two EDs. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: The competence focus in everyday work in EDs is on emergency and life-saving actions. There is a polarisation between medical and caring competencies. There is also tension between professional groups in EDs as well as hierarchical boundaries that influence the ability to develop competencies in everyday work. Medical competencies are valued more and caring competencies are subsequently downgraded. A medical approach to competencies consolidates the view of necessary competencies in everyday work in EDs. Conclusions: The study shows that the competencies that are valued consolidate the prevailing medical paradigm. There is a traditional, one-sided approach to competencies, a hierarchical distinction between professional groups and unclear occupational functions.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Jakobsson Ung, Eva
    Management of everyday work in Emergency Departments: An exploratory study with Swedish Managers2014In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Through their formal mandate, position and authority, managers are responsible for managing everyday work in Emergency Departments (EDs) as well as striving for excellence and dealing with the individual needs of practitioners and patients. The aim of the present study is to explore managers’experiences of managing everyday work in Swedish EDs. Method: A qualitative and exploratory design has been used in this study. Seven managers were interviewed at two EDs. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis with focus on latent content. Results: Managers experience everyday work in the ED as lifesaving work. One of the characteristics of their approach to everyday work is their capability for rapidly identifying patients with life-threatening conditions and for treating them accordingly. The practitioners are on stand-by in order to deal with unexpected situations. This implies having to spend time waiting for the physicians’ decisions. Management is characterised by a command and control approach. The managers experience difficulties in meeting the expectations of their staff. They strive to be proactive but instead they become reactive since the prevailing medical, bureaucratic and production-orientated systems constrain them. Conclusion: The managers demonstrate full compliance with the organisational systems. This threatens to reduce their freedom of action and influences the way they perform their managerial duties within and outside the EDs.

  • 8. Andersson, Sten-Ove
    et al.
    Lundberg, Lars
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jonsson, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Tingström, Pia
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care - When training becomes reality.2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 70-77, article id S1755-599X(17)30010-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify physicians' and nurses' perceptions of military pre-hospital emergency care before and after an international mission. A qualitative empirical study with a phenomenographic approach was used. The results after pre-deployment training can be categorised as (1) learning about military medicine and (2) taking care of the casualty. The results after an international mission can be categorised as (1) collaborating with others, (2) providing general health care and (3) improving competence in military medicine. These results indicate that the training should be developed in order to optimise pre-deployment training for physicians and nurses. This may result in increased safety for the provider of care, while at the same time minimising suffering and enhancing the possibility of survival of the injured.

  • 9. Elmqvist, C
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    More than medical treatment: The patient’s first encounter with prehospital emergency care2008In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common feature of emergency care services is the short, fragmented encounters with great demands for rapid treatment and efficiency. The aim of this study was to describe and understand the patient’s first encounter with prehospital emergency care as experienced by the patient and the first responders. A lifeworld perspective was used in four different traumatic situations. The data consisted of 18 unstructured interviews with patients and first responders. The phenomenological analysis showed that the concept of lifesaving means more than just upholding vital functions. The patient needs to retain his/her identity by means of a communicative contact, to be confirmed in the lived encounter and to recapitulate the elapsed time of the unexpected event in order to regain a state of equilibrium. Five constituents further described the variations of the patients’ first encounter; the encounter with the helpless injured body, the confirming existential encounter, the encounter while waiting, the lived encounter and the recapitulated encounter. This finding highlights the importance of a new understanding about empowering the patient with narratives throughout the whole caring process. There are also implications for educating personnel and students in emergency care about the first encounter with the patient in emergency care where the senses, the time and the narrative are essential elements that are unique for each person.

  • 10. Elmqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Trapped between doing and being: First provider´s experiences of ”front line” work2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common focus in research studies within the Emergency Department (ED) is physician patient relations, experiences of the triage model and nurses´ experiences of caring. Little has, however, been written about different first providers´ experiences of working on the “front line” at the ED. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first provider on the “front line” at the ED, as expressed by nurse assistants, registered nurses and physicians. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used in four different caring situations. The data consisted of eight open-ended interviews with first providers. The analysis showed that being the first provider on the “front line” at the ED entails a continuous movement between providing and responding through performing “life-saving” actions and at the same time create a good relationship with the patient and the next of kin. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon. The readiness to save lives creates a perceived stress of time pressure and the first providers adopt different strategies to cope with the work. Instead of leaving the first providers to find their own way to cope with the complex situation, there are needs for a redesigning of the internal work process within ED organizations.

  • 11. Magnusson, Carl
    et al.
    Källenius, Christofer
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Pre-hospital assessment by a single responder: The Swedish ambulance nurse in a new role2015In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a person with vague symptoms calls 112, the dispatchers often have difficulty prioritising the severity of the call. Their only alternative has been to send an ambulance. In Gothenburg, Sweden, a nurse-manned single responder (SR) was initiated to assess this patient group. The study aims to describe patient characteristics and assessment level made by the SR nurse among patients assessed by the dispatcher as low priority and/or vague symptoms. A consecutive journal review was conducted. During six months, 529 patients were assessed; 329 (62%) attended the emergency department (ED) or inpatient care (IC). Of these, 85 patients (26%) were assessed as high priority. Only 108 were assessed as being in need of ambulance transport. ED/IC patients were significantly older. Two hundred (38%) stayed at the scene (SS) (n = 142) or were referred to primary care (PC) (n = 58). Of the 200 SS/PC patients, 38 (19%) attended the ED within 72 hrs with residual symptoms, 20 of whom were admitted to a ward. Nine patients (4% of 200 SS/PC patients) required inpatient treatment and 11 patients stayed overnight for observation. These results suggest a relatively high level of patient safety and the usefulness of an SR among patients assessed by the dispatcher as low priority.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Christina
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University.
    Svantesson, Mia
    Kalmar University.
    Responsibility and compassion in prehospital support to survivors of suicide victim – Professionals’ experiences2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 35, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Death is not only an ending: it is also a beginning for the survivors. Early support can ease suicide victim survivors grieving and reduce the risk of negatively impacting one's mental health. However, knowledge is scant regarding this need and regarding the vital role that prehospital care can have in supporting survivors to regain their footing in life.

    Aim: To describe the care of suicide victim survivors from the perspectives of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel, police officers and general practitioners.

    Design: Qualitative descriptive study.

    Method: Six focus group discussions with EMS personnel, police officers and general practitioners (n = 26), were conducted in a Swedish county. Data were analysed using content analysis.

    Results: The EMS personnel, police officers and general practitioners described their situation as being characterised by feelings of inadequacy as they faced the survivors’ emotional storm and despair. They made attempts to shield themselves and also the survivors. Focus was on the survivors, to give time, to be accessible and to find a person who could continue providing support. The professionals experienced a deep sense of uncertainty about their responsibility and feeling torn in their professional role and a frustration over lack of guidelines.

    Conclusions: This complex situation involves not only the ethical conflict of ‘should I stay or should I go’, i.e. whether to take responsibility or not, but also each professional’s capacity and courage to give compassionate care.

  • 13. Petzäll, K
    et al.
    Tällberg, J
    Lundin, T
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Threats and violence in the Swedish prehospital emergency care2011In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although acts of threats and violence are problems that have received increased attention in recent years within Swedish pre-hospital care, only a handful of scientific studies have been carried out in this field. Threats and violence have a negative influence on the well-being of ambulance personnel. The aim in this study was both to investigate the incidents of threats and violence within the Swedish ambulance service and to describe these situations. Data was collected with questionnaires answered by 134 registered nurses and paramedics from 11 ambulance stations located in four counties. The respondents’ experiences of pre-hospital care varied from 3 months to 41 years (mean = 12 years, median = 8 years). The results showed that 66% of the ambulance personnel experienced threats and/or violence during their work while 26% experienced threats and 16% faced physical violence during the last year. The most common kind of threat was threats of physical violence with 27% of the respondents experiencing threats involving weapons. Commonly occurring physical violence was in the form of pushes, punches, kicks and bites. In most cases, the perpetrator was the patient himself often under the influence of alcohol or drugs. The most serious situations occurred when the reason for raising the ambulance alarm was intoxication or a decreased level of consciousness.

  • 14.
    Sterner, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Jönköping University.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Novice nurses' perceptions of acute situations - A phenomenographic study.2017In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, article id S1755-599X(17)30169-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Today's nurses face complex patient challenges and increased patient acuity. Novice nurses may feel unprepared for some of the tasks facing them. In order to prevent adverse events and improve patient outcomes, the management of acute situations has been identified as an area needing attention. Despite this, it is not yet clear what novice nurses themselves perceive as an acute situation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe novice nurses' perceptions of acute situations.

    METHOD: The study has a qualitative, descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve novice nurses, with less than a year of working experience, about their perceptions of acute situations.

    RESULTS: Acute situations are perceived as situations that occur suddenly, that involve shortage of time, or that generate a sense of insufficient personal competence. When acute situations arise, nurses experience a feeling of overwhelming responsibility. Acute situations involve not only deteriorating patient health but can also include challenging interpersonal relations or deficiencies in organisational procedures.

    CONCLUSION: An acute situation, as perceived by novice nurses, contains significantly more than medical manifestations related to the patient, a prominent perception being that interpersonal relations are crucial for appropriate management.

  • 15.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    How do ambulance personnel experience work at a disaster site?2001In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working at a major accident site is a complex matter where knowledge from various fields must be put into practice. In addition, the different situations at emergency and disaster sites place a variety of demands on personnel, equipment and organization. The aim of the present study is to investigate how the ambulance personnel perceived their own action and the functioning of the whole emergency organization at a major accident site (large discotheque fire) in 1998. Working from a list obtained from the fire department, a questionnaire with 57 questions was sent to the personnel (n = 36) who had participated at the accident site either as ambulance crew members or as members of a medical team sent out from the hospital. The response rate was 80 per cent. Despite the extreme situation, most of the ambulance personnel involved were satisfied with their own preparedness as well as the medical and nursing care performed at the site. Those who where not satisfied reported that the main reason for dissatisfaction was lack of time to calm and comfort people who were not injured or had only minor injuries. The need of more medical support for the medical team members at the site was also emphasized with regard to the care of the severely injured. The ambulance service crews from the suburbs, in comparison with the local city rescue service, were, in general, less satisfied with the co-operation from other rescue units.

  • 16. Vicente, Veronica
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Castren, Maaret
    Sjöstrand, Fredrik
    Svensson, Leif
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Differentiating frailty in older people using the Swedish ambulance service: A retrospective audit2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 228-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elderly population in Sweden is increasing. This will lead to an increased need for healthcare resources and put extra demands on healthcare professionals. Consequently, ambulance personnel will be faced with the challenge of meeting extra demands from increasing numbers of older people with complex and atypical clinical presentations. Therefore we highlight that great problems exist for ambulance personnel to understand and meet these patients’ care needs. Using a caring science approach, we apply the patient’s perspective, and the aim of this study is to identify and illuminate the conditions that affect elderly people assessed with the assessment category “general affected health condition”. Thus, we have analyzed the characteristics belonging to this specific condition. The method is a retrospective audit, involving a qualitative content analysis of a total of 88 emergency service records. The conclusion is that by using caring science, the concept of frailty which is based on a comprehensive understanding of human life can clarify the state of “general affected health condition”, as either illness or ill-health. This offers a new assessment category and outlines care and treatment that strengthen and support the health and wellbeing of the individual elderly person. Furthermore, the concept of frailty ought to be included in “The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems” (ICD-10).

  • 17. Wallin, Kim
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Thorén, Ann-Britt
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Prehospital Emergency Nursing students’ experiences of learning during prehospital clinical placements2013In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical placements play an important role in learning a new profession, but students report about poor placement experiences. Standards have been laid down for improvements within clinical training in Prehospital Emergency Nursing programmes in Sweden, but no studies have been carried out in this field in a Swedish context. The purpose of this study was thus to describe the experiences of Prehospital Emergency Nursing (PEN) students of their clinical placement and the effect on their learning process. Data were collected in 28 individual interviews and analyzed in accordance with Flanagan’s Critical Incident Technique. Three main areas emerged: the professional clinical supervisor, the clinical placement setting and the learning strategy. All these areas played a significant role in the PEN students’ learning progress and development into a new professional role. The choice of clinical supervisor (CS) and clinical placement is important if PEN students’ learning is to be an effective and positive experience. The prehospital environment is unique and can have positive and negative effects on student learning depending on the support and structure given during their clinical placement. A learning strategy based on reflective dialogue, CS continuity and a learning structure based on the prehospital environment is presented. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Caring assessment in the Swedish ambulance services relieves suffering and enables safe decisions2011In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has a health care science approach and explores pre-hospital emergency care with emphasis on assessment. Health care science is focused on the patient with the general aim to describe care that strengthens and supports health. Assessment in the ambulance services has not been explored earlier from this perspective, despite the emphasis on ‘coming close’ to the acute suffering patient. The aim of the study is to describe and analyse assessment in caring situations. Data was collected by participant observations. The major findings point out the importance of professional carers’ recognition of the patient’s lifeworld as an essential part of assessment. The carers’ openness to the situation and to the patient’s suffering and needs vary from being of minor interest to complete focus of the assessment. It seems that assessments that focus solely on a patient’s medical condition can be an obstacle to a full understanding of the individual, and thereby the illness per se. A caring assessment based on an encounter and a dialogue between patient and carer, characterised by inviting the patient to participate, adds further dimensions to the objective data. Therefore, the inclusion of the patient perspective relieves suffering and enables more safe decisions.

1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf