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  • 1.
    Gacia, Danilo
    et al.
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Karlskrona.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Archer, Trevor
    Rosenberg, Patricia
    Network for Empowerment and Well-Being.
    The Dark Side of the Affective  Profiles: Differences and Similarities  in Psychopathy, Machiavellianism,  and Narcissism2015In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, ISSN 2158-2440, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affective profiles model is based on the combination of individuals’ experience of high/low positive affect and high/low negative affect: self-fulfilling, high affective, low affective, and self-destructive. We used the profiles as the backdrop for the investigation of individual differences in malevolent character traits (i.e., the Dark Triad: psychopathy, Machiavellianism, and narcissism). A total of 1,000 participants (age: M = 31.50 SD = 10.27, 667 males and 333 females), recruited through Amazons’ Mechanical Turk (MTurk), responded to the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule and the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen. Individuals with a high affective profile reported higher degree of narcissism than those with any other profile, and together with individuals with a self-destructive profile, also higher degree of Machiavellianism and psychopathy than individuals with a low affective and self-fulfilling profile. Males scored higher in Machiavellianism and psychopathy. Together with earlier findings, our results show that while individuals in both the self-fulfilling and high affective profiles are extrovert and self-directed, only those in the high affective profile express an immature and malevolent character (i.e., high levels of all Dark Triad traits). Conversely, individuals in the self-fulfilling profile have earlier reported higher levels of cooperativeness and faith. More importantly, the unique association between high levels of positive emotions and narcissism and the unified association between negative emotions to both psychopathy and Machiavellianism imply a dyad rather than a triad of malevolent character traits.

  • 2.
    Theandersson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Rolandsson, Bertil
    Preventing Cooperative Knowledge Production From Falling Apart: A Matter of Trust in Academia2013In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. October-December, no 4, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyze why work life representatives are engaging themselves in joint knowledge production with academia. We intend to deepen our understanding of how the practitioners’ trust in academia is constituted, that is what trust-building practices conditions their trust. The article is based on interviews with practitioners who are cooperating with a Swedish research center. The result indicates that practitioners’ trust in cooperation is based on a combination of different trust-building practices, among which the academy as a dependable supplier of objective and authoritative knowledge production is still important. At the same time, practitioners’ trust is also dependent on the existence of shared and integrated knowledge production relevant to their professions. The main conclusion of the study is that academia has to manage a set of different conditions demanding that different trust-building practices be combined and managed for trust to be maintained.

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