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  • 1. Carrillo Nieves, Danay
    et al.
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sárvári Horvátha, Ilona
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Improvement of biogas production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB)2011In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1097-1101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB), a waste lignocellulosic material, which is the main byproduct of vegetable oil production industries in Indonesia and Malaysia, was utilized as a source for biogas production. Pretreatments using NaOH as well as phosphoric acid were investigated to improve the biogas production. Clear positive effects of the pretreatments on the yield of methane were observed. The best improvement was achieved when 8% NaOH for 60 min was used for the pretreatment, which resulted in 100% improvement in the yield of methane production. In addition, treatment with phosphoric acid resulted in 40% improvement in the methane yield compared with that of the untreated material. The results showed that the carbohydrate content of OPEFB could be efficiently converted to methane under the anaerobic digestion process. 97% of the theoretical value of methane production was achieved after the pretreatment with NaOH for 60 min. Moreover, the initial rate of methane production was also increased by more than 85% after the treatment with NaOH compared with that of the untreated OPEFB.

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  • 2.
    Duan, Y.
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Pandey, Ashok
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, 226 001, India.
    Zhang, Z.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bhatia, S. K.
    eDepartment of Biological Engineering, College of Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul, 05029, South Korea.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Organic solid waste biorefinery: Sustainable strategy for emerging circular bioeconomy in China2020In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biorefinery perceived as impeccable encouraging perspective of generating multiple bio-products from organic solid waste through integration of various relevant techniques. With the improved attractiveness of circular bio-economy as a greatly potential approach in view of social soaring energy demands and biodiversity conservation, biorefinery contributed as sustainable strategic mechanism for emerging circular bio-economy. Present study outlined a comprehensive review of the status for organic solid waste derived from agriculture, industry and urban toward to available biorefinery approach. In addition, evaluated techno-economic assessment and proposed the current bottleneck challenges and future perspective for sustainability of circular bio-economy in China. The results demonstrated that the diversity kinds of solid waste played an essential role in implement of biorefinery in circular bio-economy. Achieving sustainable circular bio-economy requires coordinated development of economic, environment and social. There is still a great gap between actual performance with expectation of biorefinery in bio-economy, comprehensive investigations and depth exploration were critical for sustainability.

  • 3. Goshadrou, Amir
    et al.
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bioethanol production from sweet sorghum bagasse by Mucor hiemalis2011In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1219-1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work deals with production of ethanol from sweet sorghum bagasse by a zygomycetes fungus Mucor hiemalis. The bagasse was treated with phosphoric acid and sodium hydroxide, with or without ultrasonication, prior to enzymatic hydrolysis by commercial cellulase and β-glucosidase enzymes. The phosphoric acid pretreatment was performed at 50 °C for 30 min, while the alkali treatment performed with 12% NaOH at 0 °C for 3 h. The pretreatments resulted in improving the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis to 79–92% of the theoretical yield. The best hydrolysis performance was obtained after pretreatment by NaOH assisted with ultrasonication. The fungus showed promising results in fermentation of the hydrolyzates. In the best case, the hydrolyzate of NaOH-ultrasound pretreated bagasse followed by 24 h fermentation resulted in about 81% of the corresponding theoretical ethanol yield. Furthermore, the highest volumetric ethanol productivity was observed in the hydrolyzates of NaOH pretreated bagasse, especially after ultrasonication in pretreatment stage.

  • 4.
    Johansson, Matilda
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kadi, Nawar
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dhakal, H. N.
    Advanced Polymers and Composites (APC) Research Group, School of Mechanical and Design Engineering, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3DJ, UK.
    Effect of lignin acetylation on the mechanical properties of lignin-poly-lactic acid biocomposites for advanced applications2023In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 202, article id 117049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioplastics that possess characteristics like durability and low cost are desired for versatile applications in industries such as automotive manufacturing, marine transport manufacturing, aerospace applications, and the building industry. The automotive industry is an example of an industry that is now shifting towards a more focused approach addressing the issue concerning sustainability and the development of sustainable material. To achieve a lightweight and sustainable construction, one of the methods used by the automotive original equipment manufacturers is by substituting conventional fossil-based, non-renewable composites, and metallic materials with a bio-based alternative. One of the drawbacks with biobased polymers can be the poor interfacial adhesion, leading to poor mechanical properties when compares to conventional material. The aim of this research is to investigate if a low-cost by-product could be used as a component in a composite matrix material in the automotive industry to reduce the final weight and increase the non-petrochemical material usage of composite material without compromising the thermal and mechanicals properties demanded. In this research, lignin was chemically altered by esterification the functional groups to increase the compatibility with polylactic acid. The esterification was performed with the use of acetic acid anhydride and pyridine. To evaluate and determine the esterification, Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy was used. By blending the modified lignin with polylactic acid the intention was to improve the thermomechanical properties and the interfacial linkage between the components. The effects of lignin acetylation on the tensile properties, impact strength, and thermal stability and moisture repellence behaviour were investigated. According to the experimental results the modification of lignin, increased the impact strength for all the blends containing acetylated lignin compares to pristine lignin. The largest increase observed was for blends containing 20 wt% acetylated lignin and polylactic acid, which resulted in a 74% improvement compared with the blend composed of pristine lignin and polylactic acid. Similarly, the thermal stability was improved significantly with acetylation of the lignin. Moreover, the moisture repellence behaviour was also increased. The reason for the improved properties can be explained by the better interfacial compatibility between lignin and polylactic acid matrix. An increased thermal stability and a moisture repellent behaviour of the blends containing chemically modified lignin could be observed when compared with neat polylactic acid which makes the acetylation treatment of lignin a possible approach for the future of biocomposite production. 

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  • 5.
    Momayez, F.
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology.
    Karimi, K.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Energy recovery from industrial crop wastes by dry anaerobic digestion: A review2019In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 129, p. 673-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most sustainable methods for treating wastes and producing energy in the form of biogas. However, this process normally has a high content of water and low total solids (TS), which could be a challenge for regions with water scarcity or treating wastewater from the digestates. Dry fermentation or anaerobic digestion (Dry-AD) is a solid-state fermentation with high TS and is accelerating in the biogas industries. Dry-AD with high volumetric biogas productivity and high organic loading rate is an effective method for treating high solid content materials such as crop wastes. The present article is dedicated to reviewing methane production from industrial crops waste through Dry-AD. The major industrial crops such as corn stover, wheat straw, and sugarcane bagasse as well as their generated wastes, composition, and potential for bioenergy production are studied. Then, the Dry-AD process parameters, advantages, and challenges are described.

  • 6.
    Nair, Ramkumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    Lennartsson, Patrik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås.
    Dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment of wheat bran for enzymatic hydrolysis and subsequent ethanol production by edible fungi Neurospora intermedia.2015In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 69, p. 314-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of an underutilized and abundant lignocellulosic feedstock residue, wheat bran, was studied for ethanol prodn. using dil. phosphoric acid pretreatment followed by fermn. using edible fungi Neurospora intermedia. Wheat bran was subjected to dil. acid pretreatment at varying acid concns. (0.5-3.0% w/v), temp. (150-210 °C), and reaction time (5-20 min). The interaction of multiple factors showed the optimum pretreatment conditions at acid concn. of 1.75% (w/v), at 190 °C for 10 min. The max. total polysaccharide yield of 0.27 ± 0.01 g/g dry biomass loading, corresponding to 66% of the theor. max. was obsd. Subsequent fermn. with N. intermedia showed 85% of the theor. max. ethanol yield from the untreated bran glucose. The effect of the dil. acid pretreatment on the functional groups of the wheat bran cellulose was detd. with 78% redn. in the cellulose crystallinity index. The validation of the dil. phosphoric acid pretreatment in a demo plant is also reported for the first time. Enzymic hydrolysis of pretreated slurry from the demo plant showed 85% total theor. yield of polysaccharides. Compared to the untreated bran biomass, an increase of 51% was obsd. in the ethanol yield following pretreatment, with a total ethanol yield of 95% theor. max. Higher yield of ethanol is also attributed to the xylose fermenting capability of the fungi. [on SciFinder(R)]

  • 7.
    Rocha-Meneses, Lisandra
    et al.
    Institute of Technology, Chair of Biosystems Engineering, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56, 51006 Tartu, Estonia.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mushtaq, Maryam
    Independent researcher, Canada.
    Karimi, Sajjad
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Orupold, Kaja
    Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 5, 51006 Tartu, Estonia.
    Kikas, Timo
    Institute of Technology, Chair of Biosystems Engineering, Estonian University of Life Sciences, Kreutzwaldi 56, 51006 Tartu, Estonia.
    Genetic modification of cereal plants: A strategy to enhance bioethanol yields from agricultural waste2020In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulosic biomass has been widely used as a feedstock for biofuel applications due to its low-cost, renewability and abundance. However, the production of liquid biofuels is still costly and inefficient mainly due to the recalcitrant structure of lignocellulosic biomass. It requires expensive pretreatment methods to break down the plant cell wall, and efficient enzymes capable of hydrolysing cellulose into glucose. One possible solution to make bioethanol production cost-effective and, at the same time, increase the energy output from the biomass is genetic engineering. Genetic modification has been reported as an effective strategy to increase productivity, biomass yields and specific traits of various agricultural plants. This paper provides an overview of the potential of cereal-based agricultural waste as a feedstock for bioethanol production. It focuses on the progress of different techniques used in genetic modification (transgenesis, cisgenesis mutagenesis and conventional breeding) to genetically engineer plant cell wall. Utilization of genetic modification of cereal plants is proposed as a solution to high costs and low yields of bioethanol production from cereal-based agricultural waste.

  • 8.
    Rocha-Meneses, Lisandra
    et al.
    Estonian University of Life Sciences.
    Ivanova, Anastasia
    Tallinn University of Technology, School of Engineering.
    Atouguia, Guilherme
    University of the Azores.
    Ávila, Isaac
    University of the Azores.
    Raud, Merlin
    Estonian University of Life Sciences.
    Orupõld, Kaja
    Estonian University of Life Sciences.
    Kikas, Timo
    Estonian University of Life Sciences.
    The effect of flue gas explosive decompression pretreatment on methane recovery from bioethanol production waste2019In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 127, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive feedstock for the production of liquid (eg. biofuel) or gaseous (eg. methane) fuels for the transportation sector. The bioethanol production process still produces a large quantity of production waste following the distillation process. Stillage consists mostly of lignin, hemicellulose, extractives, and yeast and therefore does not have any commercial value. The conversion of bioethanol production waste into gaseous biofuels like biogas or biomethane is a promising solution when it comes to transforming stillage into value-added products, enhancing the value of the biomass, and as a strategy for achieving zero-waste societies. This study aims to investigate the potential of bioethanol production waste for biomethane production. The results are compared with samples from different stages of the bioethanol production process. Milled barley straw (Hordeum vulgare) was used as a feedstock to produce energy in the form of methane, and the flue gas pre-treatment method (with and without bubbling) was applied. The results show that the methane production yield of bioethanol production waste, which has been pretreated with flue gas without bubbling is 5% higher than that of untreated substrate, and can achieve 94% of the methane production of fermented samples. Bioethanol production waste from substrates, which have been pretreated with flue gas with bubbling have a methane production level that is 29% higher than that of untreated materials. The results suggest that methane yields are influenced by the bubbling process. It is reasonable to use bioethanol production waste for the production of energy in the form of methane and to increase the energy output from the biomass.

  • 9.
    Varjani, S. J.
    et al.
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar, 382 010, Gujarat, India.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Khanal, S.
    Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA.
    Pandey, A.
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, 226 001, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    New horizons in biotechnology: Advances in sustainable industrial and environmental bioprocesses and bioproducts2020In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 158, article id 113000Article in journal (Refereed)
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