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  • 1. Hammarlund, K
    et al.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jomeen, J
    Young women’s experiences of managing self-treatment for ano-genital warts2012In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences of self-treatment for anogenital warts from the perspective of a group of young women who received it. Study design Ten young Swedish women were interviewed in the study, aged between16 and 21. The young women had been diagnosed with anogenital warts and self-managed their treatment with 0.5% podophyllotoxin solution. Results Self-management using 0.5% podophyllotoxin solution poses numerous difficulties. The nature of the treatment as a topical liquid is particularly testing for young women in terms of both application and genital pain, with implications for continuation of the treatment regime. The self-treatment challenges both personal integrity as well as interpersonal relations and creates a personal responsibility which appears to be somewhat overwhelming at times. Conclusions Health care professionals need to recognize the challenge that self-treatment poses to their clients. The issues that create difficulty in relation to topical liquid treatment regimes and importantly can lead to poor adherence to the treatment regime and discontinuation could easily be overcome by the use of different preparations. Continuity of care provider across treatments and alternative mechanisms of support would not only address some of the aspects that young women raise as particularly embarrassing and shameful, but also improve quality of care and increase general satisfaction with service provision.

  • 2.
    Kolak, Mia
    et al.
    Univ Lund Hosp.
    Jensen, Carina
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp.
    Johansson, Marianne
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Midwives' experiences of providing contraception counselling to immigrant women.2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 100-106, article id S1877-5756(16)30059-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe midwives' experiences of providing contraception counselling to immigrant women.

    METHODS: The study was conducted with a qualitative design, based on interviews followed by inductive content analysis. Ten midwives were interviewed, working at midwife-led prenatal clinics in immigrant-dense areas in southern Sweden.

    RESULTS: Midwives require knowledge and understanding of cultures and religions in order to provide contraception counselling to immigrant women. It is important for the midwives to be aware that women have different values regarding sexual and reproductive health. The challenge for the midwives is to understand and to be curious about every woman's lifeworld perspective, culture and religion. The midwives knowledge and understanding of cultures and religions is acquired through experience and shared between them. Knowledge makes a midwife confident in her role as the contraception counselling provider to immigrant women.

    CONCLUSION: Cultural and religious factors affect contraception counselling. According to the midwives, knowledge and awareness of these factors is crucial and leads to improved understanding of midwives providing contraception counselling, better compliance, fewer unwanted pregnancies and improved sexual and reproductive health among women.

  • 3.
    Lindgren, Helena E
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Nässén, Kristina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Taking the matter into one's own hands - Women's experiences of unassisted homebirths in Sweden.2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 11, p. 31-35, article id S1877-5756(16)30139-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: There are no national guidelines or financial support for planned homebirths in Sweden. Some women choose to give birth at home without the assistance of a midwife. The objective of this study was to describe eight women's experience of unassisted planned homebirth in Sweden.

    DESIGN: Women who had the experience of an unassisted planned home birth were interviewed. The material was analysed using a phenomenological approach.

    RESULTS: The essential meaning of the phenomenon giving birth at home without the assistance of a midwife is understood as a conflict between, on one hand, inner responsibility, power and control and on the other hand insecurity in relation to the outside, to other people and to the social system. A wish to be cared for by a midwife is in conflict with the fear of not maintaining integrity and respect in this precious moment of birth.

    CONCLUSION: Some women may be more sensitive to attitudes and activities that are routinely performed during pregnancy and childbirth and therefore choose not to turn to any representatives of the medical system. The challenge should be to provide safe care to all women so that assistance from a midwife becomes a reality in all settings.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Christina
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    The delivery room: is it a safe place? A hermeneutic analysis of women's negative birth experiences.2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 199-204, article id S1877-5756(14)00063-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Women's negative experiences in the delivery room can have significance for later fear of childbirth. Therefore, it is important to critically evaluate the care during childbirth. The aim was to gain a deeper understanding of women's negative experiences in the delivery room.

    METHODS: This study is based on original data from three qualitative studies on Swedish women's experiences of fear of childbirth. Data were collected from interviews with 21 women; 15 pregnant women (6 + 9) with intense fear of childbirth, and six women who had experienced intense fear of childbirth 7-11 years prior to the interview. The analysis had a hermeneutic approach, with focus on the women's descriptions of their previous negative birth experiences.

    FINDINGS: The interpretation showed that in the delivery room the women were objects of surveillance, and they endured suffering related to the care during childbirth. This involves experiences of midwives as uncaring, feelings of being suppressed, unprotected and lacking safety, of feeling disconnected and of the body as incompetent in giving birth. The birth environments are understood as power structures, containing views of women's birthing bodies as machines, and delivery rooms as surveillance environments, involving interventions such as foetal heart monitoring, induction and augmentation of labour.

    CONCLUSIONS: The delivery room was, for these women, a place creating fear of childbirth. To avoid negative birth experiences and future fear, women must be offered not only medical, but also emotional and existential safety in the delivery room.

  • 5.
    Palmér, Lina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ida, Gustafsson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Midwives' lived experience of caring for new mothers with initial breastfeeding difficulties: A phenomenological study2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study is to obtain a deeper understanding of midwives’ lived experiences of caring for new mothers with initial breastfeeding difficulties.

    Methods: A reflective lifeworld approach was used. Six midwives were recruited from a hospital in western Sweden. Data were collected via individual lifeworld interviews and analysed using phenomenological methods.

    Results: The essential meaning can be described as a midwife’s wish to help new mothers reach their breastfeeding goals by trying to interact with them as individual women in unique breastfeeding situations. This wish constitutes a contradiction to the midwife’s own desire to succeed in enabling mothers to breastfeed and the perceived risk of failure as a midwife if the mothers decide not to breastfeed. This is further described by five constituents: striving to provide individualised care, collegial and personal responsibility both enables and prevents care, a struggle to be sufficient, an uphill struggle and mutual joy becomes the motivation to care.

    Conclusions: Caring for new mothers with initial breastfeeding difficulties is a balancing act between the midwife’s personal desire to succeed in enabling mothers to breastfeed, the mothers’ wishes, the infants’ needs, the importance of collective collegial competence and the limitations in the health care organisation. This makes the midwife’s efforts to provide individualised care frustrating and demanding as well as motivating.

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