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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Clinical reasoning in the emergency medical services: an integrative review2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Clinical reasoning is the process of gathering and understanding information conducted by clinicians in the emergency medical services (EMS) so as to make informed decisions. Research on clinical reasoning spans several disciplines, but a comprehensive view of the process is lacking. To our knowledge, no review of clinical reasoning in the EMS has been conducted.

    Aim: The aim was to investigate the nature, deployment, and factors influencing EMS clinicians’ clinical reasoning by means of a review.

    Method: Data was collected through searches in electronic databases, networking among research teams ,colleagues and friends, “grey literature,” and through ancestry searches. A total of 38 articles were deemed eligible for inclusion and were analyzed using descriptive thematic analysis. The analysis resulted in an overarching finding -namely, the importance for EMS clinicians to adjust for perceived control in unpredictable situations. Within this finding, 3 themes emerged in terms of EMS clinicians’ clinical reasoning: (1) maintaining a holistic view of the patient; (2) keeping an open mind; and (3) improving through criticism. Seven subthemes subsequently emerged from these three themes.

    Results: This review showed that EMS clinicians’ clinical reasoning begins with the information that they are given about a patient. Based on this information, clinicians calculate the best route to the patient and which equipment to use, and they also assess potential risks. They need to be constantly aware of what is happening on the scene and with the patient and strive to control the situation. This striving also enables EMS clinicians to work safely and effectively in relation to the patient, their relatives, other clinicians, associated organizations, and the wider community. A lack of contextually appropriate guidelines results in the need for creativity and forces EMS clinicians to use “workarounds” to solve issues beyond the scope of the guidelines available. In addition, they often lack organizational support and fear repercussions such as litigation, unemployment, or blame by their EMS or healthcare organization or by patients and relatives.

    Conclusion: Clinical reasoning is influenced by several factors. Further research is needed to determine which influencing factors can be addressed through interventions to minimize their impact on patient outcomes.

  • 2. Azeli, Youcef
    et al.
    Barberia, E
    Jimenez Herrera, Maria
    Bonet, G
    Valero-Mora, Eva
    Lopez-Gomariz, A
    Lucas-Guarque, Isac
    Guillen-Lopez, A
    Alonso-Villaverde, C
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bardaji, Alfredo
    The ReCaPTa study - a prospective out of hospital cardiac arrest registry including multiple sources of surveillance for the study of sudden cardiac death in the Mediterranean area2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, ISSN ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death in the industrialized world. Sudden cardiac death is very often the first manifestation of the disease and it occurs in the prehospital setting. The determination of the sudden cardiac death phenotype is challenging. It requires prospective studies in the community including multiple sources of case ascertainment that help to identify the cause and circumstances of death. The aim of the Clinical and Pathological Registry of Tarragona (ReCaPTa) is to study incidence and etiology of Sudden Cardiac Death in the Tarragona region (Catalonia, Spain). Methods: ReCaPTa is a population-based registry of OHCA using multiple sources of surveillance. The population base is 511,662. This registry is compiled chronologically in a relational database and it prospectively contains data on all the OHCA attended by the EMS from April 2014 to April 2017. ReCaPTa collects data after each emergency medical assistance using an online application including variables of the onset of symptoms. A quality control is performed and it permits monitoring the percentage of cases included by the emergency crew. Simultaneously, data from the medico-legal autopsies is taken from the Pathology Center of the area. All the examination findings following a specific protocol for the sudden death study are entered into the ReCaPTa database by one trained person. Survivors admitted to hospital are followed up and their clinical variables are collected in each hospital. The primary care researchers analyze the digital clinical records in order to obtain medical background. All the available data will be reviewed after an adjudication process with the aim of identifying all cases of sudden cardiac death. Discussion: There is a lack of population-based registries including multiple source of surveillance in the Mediterranean area. The ReCaPTa study could provide valuable information to prevent sudden cardiac death and develop new strategies to improve its survival.

  • 3.
    Djarv, T
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Stromsoe, A
    Mälardalen University.
    Israelsson, J
    Linnaeus University.
    Claesson, A
    Linköping University.
    Traumatic cardiac arrest in Sweden 1990-2016 - a population-based national cohort study.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Trauma is a main cause of death among young adults worldwide. Patients experiencing a traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) certainly have a poor prognosis but population-based studies are sparse. Primarily to describe characteristics and 30-day survival following a TCA as compared with a medical out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (medical CA).

    METHODS: A cohort study based on data from the nationwide, prospective population-based Swedish Registry for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (SRCR), a medical cardiac arrest registry, between 1990 and 2016. The definition of a TCA in the SRCR is a patient who is unresponsive with apnoea where cardiopulmonary resuscitation and/or defibrillation have been initiated and in whom the Emergency Medical Services (EMS, mainly a nurse-based system) reported trauma as the aetiology. Outcome was overall 30-day survival. Descriptive statistics as well as multivariable logistic regression models were used.

    RESULTS: In all, between 1990 and 2016, 1774 (2.4%) cases had a TCA and 72,547 had a medical CA. Overall 30-day survival gradually increased over the years, and was 3.7% for TCAs compared to 8.2% following a medical CA (p < 0.01). Among TCAs, factors associated with a higher 30-day survival were bystander witnessed and having a shockable initial rhythm (adjusted OR 2.67, 95% C.I. 1.15-6.22 and OR 8.94 95% C.I. 4.27-18.69, respectively).

    DISCUSSION: Association in registry-based studies do not imply causality but TCA had short time intervals in the chain of survival as well as high rates of bystander-CPR.

    CONCLUSION: In a medical CA registry like ours, prevalence of TCAs is low and survival is poor. Registries like ours might not capture the true incidence. However, many individuals do survive and resuscitation in TCAs should not be seen futile.

  • 4.
    Hagiwara, M
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bremer, A
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Claesson, A
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Axelsson, C
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Norberg, Gabriella
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The impact of direct admission to a catheterisation lab/CCU in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction on the delay to reperfusion and early risk of death: results of a systematic review including meta-analysis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background For each hour of delay from fist medical contact until reperfusion in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) there is a 10% increase in risk of death and heart failure. The aim of this review is to describe the impact of the direct admission of patients with STEMI to a Catheterisation laboratory (cath lab) as compared with transport to the emergency department (ED) with regard to delays and outcome. Methods Databases were searched for from April-June 2012 and updated January 2014: 1) Pubmed; 2) Embase; 3) Cochrane Library; 4) ProQuest Nursing and 5) Allied Health Sources. The search was restricted to studies in English, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian languages. The intervention was a protocol-based clinical pre-hospital pathway and main outcome measurements were the delay to balloon inflation and hospital mortality. Results Median delay from door to balloon was significantly shorter in the intervention group in all 5 studies reported. Difference in median delay varied between 16 minutes and 47 minutes. In all 7 included studies the time from symptom onset or first medical contact to balloon time was significantly shorter in the intervention group. The difference in median delay varied between 15 minutes and 1 hour and 35 minutes. Only two studies described hospital mortality. When combined the risk of death was reduced by 37%. Conclusion An overview of available studies of the impact of a protocol-based pre-hospital clinical pathway with direct admission to a cath lab as compared with the standard transport to the ED in ST-elevation AMI suggests the following. The delay to the start of revascularisation will be reduced. The clinical benefit is not clearly evidence based. However, the documented association between system delay and outcome defends the use of the pathway.

  • 5.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jonsson, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Henricson, Mia
    Exclusion of context knowledge in the development of prehospital guidelines: results produced by realistic evaluation.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 21, no 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Prehospital work is accomplished using guidelines and protocols, but there is evidence suggesting that compliance with guidelines is sometimes low in the prehospital setting. The reason for the poor compliance is not known. The objective of this study was to describe how guidelines and protocols are used in the prehospital context. Methods This was a single-case study with realistic evaluation as a methodological framework. The study took place in an ambulance organization in Sweden. The data collection was divided into four phases, where phase one consisted of a literature screening and selection of a theoretical framework. In phase two, semi-structured interviews with the ambulance organization's stakeholders, responsible for the development and implementation of guidelines, were performed. The third phase, observations, comprised 30 participants from both a rural and an urban ambulance station. In the last phase, two focus group interviews were performed. A template analysis style of documents, interviews and observation protocols was used. Results The development of guidelines took place using an informal consensus approach, where no party from the end users was represented. The development process resulted in guidelines with an insufficiently adapted format for the prehospital context. At local level, there was a conscious implementation strategy with lectures and manikin simulation. The physical format of the guidelines was the main obstacle to explicit use. Due to the format, the ambulance personnel feel they have to learn the content of the guidelines by heart. Explicit use of the guidelines in the assessment of patients was uncommon. Many ambulance personnel developed homemade guidelines in both electronic and paper format. The ambulance personnel in the study generally took a positive view of working with guidelines and protocols and they regarded them as indispensable in prehospital care, but an improved format was requested by both representatives of the organization and the ambulance personnel. Conclusions The personnel take a positive view of the use of guidelines and protocols in prehospital work. The main obstacle to the use of guidelines and protocols in this organization is the format, due to the exclusion of context knowledge in the development process.

  • 6.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Wireklint-Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jonsson, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lundberg, Lars
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ljungström, Lars
    Suspicion and treatment of severe sepsis. An overview of the prehospital chain of care.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 20, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Sepsis is a life-threatening condition where the risk of death has been reported to be even higher than that associated with the major complications of atherosclerosis, i.e. myocardial infarction and stroke. In all three conditions, early treatment could limit organ dysfunction and thereby improve the prognosis. Aim To describe what has been published in the literature a/ with regard to the association between delay until start of treatment and outcome in sepsis with the emphasis on the pre-hospital phase and b/ to present published data and the opportunity to improve various links in the pre-hospital chain of care in sepsis. Methods A literature search was performed on the PubMed, Embase (Ovid SP) and Cochrane Library databases. Results In overall terms, we found a small number of articles (n=12 of 1,162 unique hits) which addressed the prehospital phase. For each hour of delay until the start of antibiotics, the prognosis appeared to become worse. However, there was no evidence that prehospital treatment improved the prognosis. Studies indicated that about half of the patients with severe sepsis used the emergency medical service (EMS) for transport to hospital. Patients who used the EMS experienced a shorter delay to treatment with antibiotics and the start of early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). Among EMS-transported patients, those in whom the EMS staff already suspected sepsis at the scene had a shorter delay to treatment with antibiotics and the start of EGDT. There are insufficient data on other links in the prehospital chain of care, i.e. patients, bystanders and dispatchers. Conclusion Severe sepsis is a life-threatening condition. Previous studies suggest that, with every hour of delay until the start of antibiotics, the prognosis deteriorates. About half of the patients use the EMS. We need to know more about the present situation with regard to the different links in the prehospital chain of care in sepsis.

  • 7.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Berglund, A
    Svensson, L
    Blomstrand, C
    Early identification and delay to treatment in myocardial infarction and stroke: differences and similarities2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 18, no 48, p. 13-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The two major complications of atherosclerosis are acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and acute ischemic stroke. Both are life-threatening conditions characterised by the abrupt cessation of blood flow to respective organs, resulting in an infarction. Depending on the extent of the infarction, loss of organ function varies considerably. In both conditions, it is possible to limit the extent of infarction with early intervention. In both conditions, minutes count. This article aims to describe differences and similarities with regard to the way patients, bystanders and health care providers act in the acute phase of the two diseases with the emphasis on the pre-hospital phase. Method: A literature search was performed on the PubMed, Embase (Ovid SP) and Cochrane Library databases. Results: In both conditions, symptoms vary considerably. Patients appear to suspect AMI more frequently than stroke and, in the former, there is a gender gap (men suspect AMI more frequently than women). With regard to detection of AMI and stroke at dispatch centre and in Emergency Medical Service (EMS) there is room for improvement in both conditions. The use of EMS appears to be higher in stroke but the overall delay to hospital admission is shorter in AMI. In both conditions, the fast track concept has been shown to influence the delay to treatment considerably. In terms of diagnostic evaluation by the EMS, more supported instruments are available in AMI than in stroke. Knowledge of the importance of early treatment has been reported to influence delays in both AMI and stroke. Conclusion: Both in AMI and stroke minutes count and therefore the fast track concept has been introduced. Time to treatment still appears to be longer in stroke than in AMI. In the future improvement in the early detection as well as further shortening to start of treatment will be in focus in both conditions. A collaboration between cardiologists and neurologists and also between pre-hospital and in-hospital care might be fruitful.

  • 8. Källerstedt, ML
    et al.
    Berglund, A
    Thoren, AB
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Enlund, M
    Occupational affiliation does not influence practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital health care professionals2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 19, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    D-CPR (Defibrillator Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) is a technique for optimal basic life support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals can perform CPR with competence. How CPR training and provision is organized varies between hospitals, and it is our impression that in Sweden this has generally improved during the last 15-20 years. However, some hospitals still do not have any AED (Automated External Defibrillators). The aim was to investigate potential differences in practical skills between different healthcare professions before and after training in D-CPR.

  • 9. Källestedt, ML
    et al.
    Berglund, A
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Leppert, J
    Enlund, M
    The impact of CPR and AED training on healthcare professionals' self-perceived attitudes to performing resuscitation.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 20, no 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Healthcare professionals have shown concern about performing mouth-to-mouth ventilation due to the risks to themselves with the procedure. However, little is known about healthcare professionals' fears and attitudes to start CPR and the impact of training. Objective To examine whether there were any changes in the attitudes among healthcare professionals to performing CPR from before to after training. Methods Healthcare professionals from two Swedish hospitals were asked to answer a questionnaire before and after training. The questions were relating to physical and mental discomfort and attitudes to CPR. Statistical analysis used was generalized McNemar's test. Results Overall, there was significant improvement in 10 of 11 items, reflecting various aspects of attitudes to CPR. All groups of health care professionals (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses, and "others" = physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social welfare officers, psychologists, biomedical analysts) felt more secure in CPR knowledge after education. In other aspects, such as anxiety prior to a possible cardiac arrest, only nurses and assistant nurses improved. The concern about being infected, when performing mouth to mouth ventilation, was reduced with the most marked reduction in physicians (75%; P < 0.001). Conclusion In this hospital-based setting, we found a positive outcome of education and training in CPR concerning healthcare professionals' attitudes to perform CPR. They felt more secure in their knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In some aspects of attitudes to resuscitation nurses and assistant nurses appeared to be the groups that were most markedly influenced. The concern of being infected by a disease was low.

  • 10. Källestedt, ML
    et al.
    Berglund, A
    Thorén, AB
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science. [external].
    Enlund, M
    Occupational affiliation does not influence practical skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation for in-hospital healthcare professionals2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 19, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background D-CPR (Defibrillator Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) is a technique for optimal basic life support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals can perform CPR with competence. How CPR training and provision is organized varies between hospitals, and it is our impression that in Sweden this has generally improved during the last 15-20 years. However, some hospitals still do not have any AED (Automated External Defibrillators). The aim was to investigate potential differences in practical skills between different healthcare professions before and after training in D-CPR. Methods Seventy-four healthcare professionals were video recorded and evaluated for adherence to a modified Cardiff Score. A Laerdal Resusci Anne manikin in connection to PC Skill reporting System was used to evaluate CPR quality. A simulated CPR situation was accomplished during a 5-10 min scenario of ventricular fibrillation. Paired and unpaired statistical methods were used to examine differences within and between occupations with respect to the intervention. Results There were no differences in skills among the different healthcare professions, except for compressions per minute. In total, the number of compression per minute and depth improved for all groups (P < 0.001). In total, 41% of the participants used AED before and 96% of the participants used AED after the intervention (P < 0.001). Before intervention, it took a median time of 120 seconds until the AED was used; after the intervention, it took 82 seconds. Conclusion Nearly all healthcare professionals learned to use the AED. There were no differences in CPR skill performances among the different healthcare professionals.

  • 11. Källestedt, M-L
    et al.
    Rosenblad, A
    Leppert, J
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Enlund, M
    Hospital employees’ theoretical knowledge on what to do in an in-hospital cardiac arrest2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 18, no 43, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Guidelines recommend that all health care professionals should be able to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including the use of an automated external defibrillator. Theoretical knowledge of CPR is then necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate how much theoretical knowledge in CPR would increase among all categories of health care professionals lacking training in CPR, in an intervention hospital, after a systematic standardised training. Their results were compared with the staff at a control hospital with an ongoing annual CPR training programme. Methods Health care professionals at two hospitals, with a total of 3144 employees, answered a multiple-choice questionnaire before and after training in CPR. Bootstrapped chi-square tests and Fisher's exact test were used for the statistical analyses. Results In the intervention hospital, physicians had the highest knowledge pre-test, but other health care professionals including nurses and assistant nurses reached a relatively high level post-test. Improvement was inversely related to the level of previous knowledge and was thus most marked among other health care professionals and least marked among physicians. The staff at the control hospital had a significantly higher level of knowledge pre-test than the intervention hospital, whereas the opposite was found post-test. Conclusions Overall theoretical knowledge increased after systematic standardised training in CPR. The increase was more pronounced for those without previous training and for those staff categories with the least medical education.

  • 12.
    Magnusson, Carl
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg .
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University.
    Strömsöe, Anneli
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University .
    Munters, Monica
    Department of Ambulance Care, Region of Dalarna.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The final assessment and its association with field assessment in patients who were transported by the emergency medical service.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In patients who call for the emergency medical service (EMS), there is a knowledge gap with regard to the final assessment after arriving at hospital and its association with field assessment.

    AIM: In a representative population of patients who call for the EMS, to describe a) the final assessment at hospital discharge and b) the association between the assessment in the field and the assessment at hospital discharge.

    METHODS: Thirty randomly selected patients reached by a dispatched ambulance each month between 1 Jan and 31 Dec 2016 in one urban, one rural and one mixed ambulance organisation in Sweden took part in the study. The exclusion criteria were age < 18 years, dead on arrival, transport between health-care facilities and secondary missions. Each patient received a unique code based on the ICD code at hospital discharge and field assessment.

    RESULTS: In all, 1080 patients took part in the study, of which 1076 (99.6%) had a field assessment code. A total of 894 patients (83%) were brought to a hospital and an ICD code (ICD-10-SE) was available in 814 patients (91% of these cases and 76% of all cases included in the study). According to these ICD codes, the most frequent conditions were infection (15%), trauma (15%) and vascular disease (9%). The most frequent body localisation of the condition was the thorax (24%), head (16%) and abdomen (13%). In 118 patients (14% of all ICD codes), the condition according to the ICD code was judged as time critical. Among these cases, field assessment was assessed as potentially appropriate in 75% and potentially inappropriate in 12%.

    CONCLUSION: Among patients reached by ambulance in Sweden, 83% were transported to hospital and, among them, 14% had a time-critical condition. In these cases, the majority were assessed in the field as potentially appropriate, but 12% had a potentially inappropriate field assessment. The consequences of these findings need to be further explored.

  • 13.
    Magnusson, Carl
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Health Metrics Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Axelsson, Christer
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Initial assessment, level of care and outcome among children who were seen by emergency medical services: a prospective observational study.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of children in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) is infrequent representing 5.4% of the patients in an urban area in the western part of Sweden. In Sweden, patients are assessed on scene by an EMS nurse whom independently decides on interventions and level of care. To aid the EMS nurse in the assessment a triage instrument, Rapid Emergency Triage and Treatment System-paediatrics (RETTS-p) developed for Emergency Department (ED) purpose has been in use the last 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the EMS nurse assessment, management, the utilisation of RETTS-p and patient outcome.

    METHODS: A prospective, observational study was performed on 651 children aged < 16 years from January to December 2016. Statistical tests used in the study were Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test and Spearman's rank statistics.

    RESULTS: The dispatch centre indexed life-threatening priority in 69% of the missions but, of all children, only 6.1% were given a life threatening RETTS-p red colour by the EMS nurse. A total of 69.7% of the children were transported to the ED and, of these, 31.7% were discharged without any interventions. Among the non-conveyed patients, 16 of 197 (8.1%) visited the ED within 72 h but only two were hospitalised. Full triage, including five out of five vital signs measurements and an emergency severity index, was conducted in 37.6% of all children. A triage colour was not present in 146 children (22.4%), of which the majority were non-conveyed. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 0.8% (n = 5) in children 0-15 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite the incomplete use of all vital signs according to the RETTS-p, the EMS nurse assessment of children appears to be adapted to the clinical situation in most cases and the patients appear to be assessed to the appropriate level of care but indicating an over triage. It seems that the RETTS-p with full triage is used selectively in the pre-hospital assessment of children with a risk of death during the first 30 days of less than 1%.

  • 14.
    Magnusson, Carl
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Health Metrics Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. SU Ambulansen.
    Initialassessment, level of care and outcome among children who were seen by emergencymedical services: a prospective observational study.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 88-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The assessment of children in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) is infrequent representing 5.4% of the patients in an urban area in the western part of Sweden. In Sweden, patients are assessed on scene by an EMS nurse whom independently decides on interventions and level of care. To aid the EMS nurse in the assessment a triage instrument, Rapid Emergency Triage and Treatment System-paediatrics (RETTS-p) developed for Emergency Department (ED) purpose has been in use the last 5 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the EMS nurse assessment, management, the utilisation of RETTS-p and patient outcome.

    METHODS:

    A prospective, observational study was performed on 651 children aged < 16 years from January to December 2016. Statistical tests used in the study were Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test and Spearman's rank statistics.

    RESULTS:

    The dispatch centre indexed life-threatening priority in 69% of the missions but, of all children, only 6.1% were given a life threatening RETTS-p red colour by the EMS nurse. A total of 69.7% of the children were transported to the ED and, of these, 31.7% were discharged without any interventions. Among the non-conveyed patients, 16 of 197 (8.1%) visited the ED within 72 h but only two were hospitalised. Full triage, including five out of five vital signs measurements and an emergency severity index, was conducted in 37.6% of all children. A triage colour was not present in 146 children (22.4%), of which the majority were non-conveyed. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 0.8% (n = 5) in children 0-15 years.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Despite the incomplete use of all vital signs according to the RETTS-p, the EMS nurse assessment of children appears to be adapted to the clinical situation in most cases and the patients appear to be assessed to the appropriate level of care but indicating an over triage. It seems that the RETTS-p with full triage is used selectively in the pre-hospital assessment of children with a risk of death during the first 30 days of less than 1%.

  • 15. Niklasson, Amanda
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jood, Katarina
    Socioeconomic disparities in prehospital stroke care.2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recent studies have revealed socioeconomic disparities in stroke outcomes. Here, we investigated whether prehospital stroke care differs with respect to socioeconomic status (SES).

    METHODS: Consecutive stroke and TIA patients (n = 3006) admitted to stroke units at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, from 1 November 2014 to 31 July 2016, were included. Data on prehospital care were obtained from a local stroke register. Socioeconomic status was classified according to the average level of income and education within each patient's neighbourhood (postcode area).

    RESULTS: The median system delay from calling the emergency medical communication centre (EMCC) to start of brain computed tomography on hospital arrival was 3 h 47 min (95% confidence interval (CI) 3 h 30 min to 4 h 05 min) for patients within the lowest SES tertile and 3 h 17 min (95% CI 3 h 00 min to 3 h 37 min) for the highest tertile (p < 0.05). Patients with a lower SES were less likely to receive the highest priority in the ambulance (p < 0.05) and had lower rates of prehospital recognition of stroke/TIA (p < 0.05) than those with a high SES. No inequities were found concerning EMCC prioritisation or the probability of ambulance transport.

    CONCLUSIONS: We found socioeconomic inequities in prehospital stroke care which could affect the efficacy of acute stroke treatment. The ambulance nurses' ability to recognise stroke/TIA may partly explain the observed inequities.

  • 16.
    Nord, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping Univdersity.
    Svensson, Leif
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Claesson, Andreas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hult, Håkan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne
    Linköping University.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University.
    The effect of a national web course "Help-Brain-Heart" as a supplemental learning tool before CPR training:: a cluster randomised trial.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 25, no 1, article id 93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) learning methods is unclear. Our aim was to evaluate whether a web course before CPR training, teaching the importance of recognition of symptoms of stroke and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and a healthy lifestyle, could influence not only theoretical knowledge but also practical CPR skills or willingness to act in a cardiac arrest situation.

    METHODS: Classes with 13-year-old students were randomised to CPR training only (control) or a web course plus CPR training (intervention). Data were collected (practical test and a questionnaire) directly after training and at 6 months. CPR skills were evaluated using a modified Cardiff test (12-48 points). Knowledge on stroke symptoms (0-7 points), AMI symptoms (0-9 points) and lifestyle factors (0-6 points), and willingness to act were assessed by the questionnaire. The primary endpoint was CPR skills at 6 months. CPR skills directly after training, willingness to act and theoretical knowledge were secondary endpoints. Training and measurements were performed from December 2013 to October 2014.

    RESULTS: Four hundred and thirty-two students were included in the analysis of practical skills and self-reported confidence. The mean score for CPR skills was 34 points after training (control, standard deviation [SD] 4.4; intervention, SD 4.0; not significant [NS]); and 32 points at 6 months for controls (SD 3.9) and 33 points for intervention (SD 4.2; NS). At 6 months, 73% (control) versus 80% (intervention; P = 0.05) stated they would do compressions and ventilation if a friend had a cardiac arrest, whereas 31% versus 34% (NS) would perform both if the victim was a stranger. One thousand, two hundred and thirty-two students were included in the analysis of theoretical knowledge; the mean scores at 6 months for the control and intervention groups were 2.8 (SD 1.6) and 3.2 (SD 1.4) points (P < 0.001) for stroke symptoms, 2.6 (SD 2.0) and 2.9 (SD 1.9) points (P = 0.008) for AMI symptoms and 3.2 (SD 1.2) and 3.4 (SD 1.0) points (P < 0.001) for lifestyle factors, respectively.

    DISCUSSION: Use of online learning platforms is a fast growing technology that increases the flexibility of learning in terms of location, time and is available before and after practical training.

    CONCLUSIONS: A web course before CPR training did not influence practical CPR skills or willingness to act, but improved the students' theoretical knowledge of AMI, stroke and lifestyle factors.

  • 17. Ringh, M
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Hollenberg, J
    Rosenqvist, M
    Svensson, L
    Out of hospital cardiac arrest outside home in Sweden, change in characteristics, outcome and availability for public access defibrillation.2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 17, no 17, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A large proportion of patients who suffer from out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) outside home are theoretically candidates for public access defibrillation (PAD). We describe the change in characteristics and outcome among these candidates in a 14 years perspective in Sweden. METHODS: All patients who suffered an OHCA in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted between 1992 and 2005 and who were included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register (SCAR). We included patients in the survey if OHCA took place outside home excluding crew witnessed cases and those taken place in a nursing home. RESULTS: 26% of all OHCAs (10133 patients out of 38710 patients) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Within this group, the number of patients each year varied between 530 and 896 and the median age decreased from 68 years in 1992 to 64 years in 2005 (p for trend = 0.003). The proportion of patients who received bystander CPR increased from 47% in 1992 to 58% in 2005 (p for trend < 0.0001). The proportion of patients found in ventricular fibrillation (VF) declined from 56% to 50% among witnessed cases (p for trend < 0.0001) and a significant (p < 0.0001) decline was also seen among non witnessed cases.The median time from cardiac arrest to defibrillation among witnessed cases was 12 min in 1992 and 10 min in 2005 (p for trend = 0.029). Survival to one month among all patients increased from 8.1% to 14.0% (p for trend = 0.01). Among patients found in a shockable rhythm survival increased from 15.3% in 1992 to 27.0% in 2005 (p for trend < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In Sweden, there was a change i characteristics and outcome among patients who suffer OHCA outside home. Among these patients, bystander CPR increased, but the occurrence of VF decreased. One-month survival increased moderately overall and highly significantly among patients found in VF, even though the time to defibrillation changed only moderately.

  • 18. Ringh, M
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hollenberg, J
    Rosenqvist, M
    Svensson, L
    Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outside Home in Sweden, Change in Characteristics, Outcome and Availability for Public Access Defibrillation2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secondary hyperkalaemic paralysis is a rare condition often mimicking the Guillain-Barré syndrome. There have been a few case reports of hyperkalaemia caused by renal failure, trauma, and drugs where the presentation has been with muscle weakness. A case of hyperkalaemic paralysis caused by an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor is reported.

  • 19. Rubertsson, S
    et al.
    Silverstolpe, J
    Rehn, L
    Nyman, T
    Lichtveld, R
    Boomars, R
    Bruins, W
    Ahlstedt, B
    Pugiolli, H
    Lindgren, E
    Smekal, D
    Skoog, G
    Kastberg, R
    Lindblad, A
    Halliwell, D
    Box, M
    Arnwald, F
    Hardig, BM
    Chamberlain, D
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Karlsten, R
    The Study Protocol for the LINC (LUCAS in Cardiac Arrest) Study: a study comparing conventional adult out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation with a concept with mechanical chest compressions and simultaneous defibrillation2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 21, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The LUCAS™ device delivers mechanical chest compressions that have been shown in experimental studies to improve perfusion pressures to the brain and heart as well as augmenting cerebral blood flow and end tidal CO2, compared with results from standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Two randomised pilot studies in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients have not shown improved outcome when compared with manual CPR. There remains evidence from small case series that the device can be potentially beneficial compared with manual chest compressions in specific situations. This multicentre study is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of mechanical chest compressions with the LUCAS™ device whilst allowing defibrillation during on-going CPR, and comparing the results with those of conventional resuscitation. Methods/design This article describes the design and protocol of the LINC-study which is a randomised controlled multicentre study of 2500 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. The study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00609778?term=LINC&rank=1 webcite). Results Primary endpoint is four-hour survival after successful restoration of spontaneous circulation. The safety aspect is being evaluated by post mortem examinations in 300 patients that may reflect injuries from CPR. Conclusion This large multicentre study will contribute to the evaluation of mechanical chest compression in CPR and specifically to the efficacy and safety of the LUCAS™ device when used in association with defibrillation during on-going CPR.

  • 20.
    Sanfridsson, J
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Sparrevik, J
    Västerbotten Emergency Medical Services.
    Hollenberg, J
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Nordberg, P
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Djärv, T
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Ringh, M
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Svensson, L
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Forsberg, S
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Nord, A
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Claesson, A
    Department of Medicine, Centre for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institute.
    Drone delivery of an automated external defibrillator - a mixed method simulation study of bystander experience.2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects some 275,000 individuals in Europe each year. Time from collapse to defibrillation is essential for survival. As emergency medical services (EMS) response times in Sweden have increased, novel methods are needed to facilitate early treatment. Unmanned aerial vehicles (i.e. drones) have potential to deliver automated external defibrillators (AED). The aim of this simulation study was to explore bystanders' experience of a simulated OHCA-situation where a drone delivers an AED and how the situation is affected by having one or two bystanders onsite.

    METHODS: This explorative simulation study used a mixed methodology describing bystanders' experiences of retrieving an AED delivered by a drone in simulated OHCA situations. Totally eight participants were divided in two groups of bystanders a) alone or b) in pairs and performed CPR on a manikin for 5 minutes after which an AED was delivered by a drone at 50 m from the location. Qualitative data from observations, interviews of participants and video recordings were analysed using content analysis alongside descriptive data on time delays during bystander interaction.

    RESULTS: Three categories of bystander experiences emerged: 1) technique and preparedness, 2) support through conversation with the dispatcher, and 3) aid and decision-making. The main finding was that retrieval of an AED as delivered by a drone was experienced as safe and feasible for bystanders. None of the participants hesitated to retrieve the AED; instead they experienced it positive, helpful and felt relief upon AED-drone arrival and were able to retrieve and attach the AED to a manikin. Interacting with the AED-drone was perceived as less difficult than performing CPR or handling their own mobile phone during T-CPR. Single bystander simulation introduced a significant hands-off interval when retrieving the AED, a period lasting 94 s (range 75 s-110 s) with one participant compared to 0 s with two participants.

    CONCLUSION: The study shows that it made good sense for bystanders to interact with a drone in this simulated suspected OHCA. Bystanders experienced delivery of AED as safe and feasible. This has potential implications, and further studies on bystanders' experiences in real cases of OHCA in which a drone delivers an AED are therefore necessary.

  • 21. Strandmark, Rasmus
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Claesson, Andreas
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Jimenez-Herrera, Maria
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Determinants of pre-hospital pharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acute myocardial infarction2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Strandmark, Rasmus
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Claesson, Andreas
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Jimenez-Herrera, Maria
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Determinants of pre-hospitalpharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acutemyocardial infarction2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 23, no 105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Södersved Källestedt, M-L
    et al.
    Rosenblad, A
    Leppert, J
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Enlund, M
    Hospital employees' theoretical knowledge on what to do in an in-hospital cardiac arrest2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 18, no 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Guidelines recommend that all health care professionals should be able to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including the use of an automated external defibrillator. Theoretical knowledge of CPR is then necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate how much theoretical knowledge in CPR would increase among all categories of health care professionals lacking training in CPR, in an intervention hospital, after a systematic standardised training. Their results were compared with the staff at a control hospital with an ongoing annual CPR training programme. Methods Health care professionals at two hospitals, with a total of 3144 employees, answered a multiple-choice questionnaire before and after training in CPR. Bootstrapped chi-square tests and Fisher's exact test were used for the statistical analyses. Results In the intervention hospital, physicians had the highest knowledge pre-test, but other health care professionals including nurses and assistant nurses reached a relatively high level post-test. Improvement was inversely related to the level of previous knowledge and was thus most marked among other health care professionals and least marked among physicians. The staff at the control hospital had a significantly higher level of knowledge pre-test than the intervention hospital, whereas the opposite was found post-test. Conclusions Overall theoretical knowledge increased after systematic standardised training in CPR. The increase was more pronounced for those without previous training and for those staff categories with the least medical education.

  • 24. Wennman, I
    et al.
    Klittermark, P
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lernfelt, B
    Kihlgren, M
    Gustafsson, C
    Hansson, PO
    The clinical consequences of a pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke by the emergency medical service system. A pilot study.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 20, no 48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is still a considerable delay between the onset of symptoms and arrival at a stroke unit for most patients with acute stroke. The aim of the study was to describe the feasibility of a pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke by an emergency medical service (EMS) nurse in terms of diagnostic accuracy and delay from dialing 112 until arrival at a stroke unit. Methods Between September 2008 and November 2009, a subset of patients with presumed acute stroke in the pre-hospital setting were admitted by EMS staff directly to a stroke unit, bypassing the emergency department. A control group, matched for a number of background variables, was created. Results In all, there were 53 patients in the direct admission group, and 49 patients in the control group. The median delay from calling for an ambulance until arrival at a stroke unit was 54 minutes in the direct admission group and 289 minutes in the control group (p < 0.0001). In a comparison between the direct admission group and the control group, a final diagnosis of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) or the sequelae of prior stroke was found in 85% versus 90% (NS). Among stroke patients who lived at home prior to the event, the percentage of patients that were living at home after 3 months was 71% and 62% respectively (NS). Conclusions In a pilot study, the concept of a pre-hospital diagnosis of stroke by an EMS nurse was associated with relatively high diagnostic accuracy in terms of stroke-related diagnoses and a short delay to arrival at a stroke unit. These data need to be confirmed in larger studies, with a concomitant evaluation of the clinical consequences and, if possible, the level of patient satisfaction as well.

  • 25.
    Wireklint-Sundström, B
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Petersson, E
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sjöholm, M
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Gelang, C
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Axelsson, C
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A pathway care model allowing low-risk patients to gain direct admissionto a hospital medical ward a pilot study on ambulance nurses and Emergency Department phycisians2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 72-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A pathway care model allowing low-risk patients to gain rapid admission to a hospital medical ward¿¿¿a pilot study on ambulance nurses and Emergency Department physicians.BackgroundPatients with non-urgent medical symptoms who nonetheless require inpatient hospital treatment often have to wait for an unacceptably long time at the Emergency Department (ED). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and effect on length of delay of a pathway care model for low-risk patients who have undergone prehospital assessment by an ambulance nurse and ED assessment by a physician within 10 minutes of arrival at the ED.MethodsThe pilot study comparing two low-risk groups took place in western Sweden from October 2011 until January 2012. The pathway model for low-risk patients was used prospectively in the rapid admission group (N¿=¿51), who were admitted rapidly after being assessed by the nurse on scene and then assessed by the ED physician on ED admission. A retrospectively assembled control group (N¿=¿51) received traditional care at the ED. All p-values are age-adjusted.ResultsPatients in the rapid admission group were older (mean age 80 years old) than patients in the control group (mean age 73 years old) (p¿=¿0.02). The median delay from arrival at the patient¿s side until arrival in a hospital medical ward was 57 minutes for the rapid admission group versus 4 hours 13 minutes for the control group (p¿<¿0.0001). However, the median delay time from the ambulance¿s arrival at the patient¿s side until the nurse was free for a new assignment was 77 minutes for the rapid admission group versus 49 minutes for the control group (p¿<¿0.0001). The 30-day mortality rate was 20% for the rapid admission group and only 4% for the control group (p¿=¿0.16).ConclusionThe pathway care model for low-risk patients gaining rapid admission to a hospital medical ward shortened length of delay from the first assessment until arrival at the ward. However, the result was achieved at the cost of an increased workload for the ambulance nurse. Furthermore patients who were rapidly admitted to a hospital ward had a high age level and a high early mortality rate. Patient safety in this new model of fast-track assessment needs to be further evaluated.

  • 26. Wnent, Jan
    et al.
    Masterson, Siobhán
    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten
    Böttiger, Bernd W
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Koster, Ruud W
    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando
    Tjelmeland, Ingvild
    Maurer, Holger
    Bossaert, Leo
    EuReCa ONE - 27 Nations, ONE Europe, ONE Registry: a prospective observational analysis over one month in 27 resuscitation registries in Europe - the EuReCa ONE study protocol.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 23, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial variation in the incidence, likelihood of attempted resuscitation and outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across Europe. A European, multi-centre study provides the opportunity to uncover differences throughout Europe and may help find explanations for these differences. Results may also have potential to support the development of quality benchmarking between European Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

    METHODS/DESIGN: This prospective European study involves 27 different countries. It provides a common Utstein-based dataset, data collection tool and a common data collection period for all participants. Study research questions will address the following: OHCA incidence in different European regions; incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); initial presenting rhythm in patients where bystanders or EMS start CPR or any other resuscitation intervention; proportion of patients with any return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC); patient status at the end of pre-hospital treatment i.e. ROSC at handover to hospital, ongoing CPR, dead; proportion of patients still alive 30 days after OHCA; proportion of patients discharged alive from hospital. All patients who suffered an OHCA during October 2014 and were attended and/or treated by an EMS and documented in one of the participating registries will be included in the study. Each National Coordinator is responsible for data collection and quality control in his/her country and will transfer unprocessed anonymised data via secure electronic transfer. Descriptive analysis will be performed at European, national and registry level. For endpoints like ROSC, admission or survival, multivariate logistic regression analysis will be performed.

    DISCUSSION: Documenting differences in epidemiology, treatment and outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest throughout Europe is a first step in finding explanations for these differences. Study results might also support the development of quality benchmarking between Emergency Medical Services (EMS) which in turn will facilitate initiatives to improve OHCA outcome in Europe.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The EuReCa ONE Study is registered by ClinicalTrials.gov National Coordinator T02236819 ).

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