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  • 1.
    Thornquist, Clemens
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Material Evidence: definition by a series of artefacts in arts research2015In: Journal of Visual Art Practice, ISSN 1470-2029, E-ISSN 1758-9185, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 110-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of the artefact in arts research to hold formal knowledge is still very much questioned. This paper explores the potential of not a single artefact but a series of artefacts to define and demonstrate formal knowledge in itself. Through a comparative analysis of a number of basic art research projects in e.g. painting, music, fashion design and photography, the paper explores how formal aesthetic principles may be not only defined through a series of artefacts but also equally argued for on the basis of the material evidence that the artefacts provide. The analysis of the examples shows how a series of artefacts can define and validate principle results of basic art research rather than narrate interpretative results of applied art research. The self-informed and self-referential character of the examples shows how formal aesthetic principles and its expressive potential can be validated in terms of fit rather than a justified belief in relation to the aim of the research. In conclusion, the result demonstrates significant implications for theoretical conceptualisation of foundational knowledge in art research based on a form of ostensive definition without significant use of text for theoretical reasons.

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