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  • 1.
    Jutengren, Göran
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jaldestad, Ellen
    Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-141 57 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-141 57 Huddinge, Sweden.
    The Potential Importance of Social Capital and Job Crafting for Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Employees2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (1) Background: Both employees and organizations benefit from a work environment characterized by work engagement and job satisfaction. This study examines the influence of work-group social capital on individuals’ work engagement, job satisfaction, and job crafting. In addition, the mediating effect of job crafting between social capital on the one side and job satisfaction and work engagement on the other side was analyzed. (2) Methods: This study used data from 250 health-care employees in Sweden who had completed a questionnaire at two time points (six to eight months apart). Analyses of separate cross-lagged panel designs were conducted using structural regression modeling with manifest variables. (3) Results: Social capital was predictive of both job satisfaction and work engagement over time. The results also indicated that higher degrees of social capital was predictive of more cognitive and relational, but not task-related job crafting over time. There was no clear evidence for a mediating effect of job crafting for social capital to work engagement or job satisfaction. (4) Conclusion: It would be beneficial for the health-care sector to consider setting up the organizations to promote social capital within work groups. Individual workers would gain in well-being and the organization is likely to gain in efficiency and lower turnover rates.

  • 2.
    Mahakwe, G.
    et al.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028, South Africa.
    Johnson, E.
    Centre for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028, South Africa.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nilsson, S.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A systematic review of self-report instruments for the measurement of anxiety in hospitalized children with cancer2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1-20, article id 1911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anxiety has been identified as one of the most severe and long-lasting symptoms experienced by hospitalized children with cancer. Self-reports are especially important for documenting emotional and abstract concepts, such as anxiety. Children may not always be able to communicate their symptoms due to language difficulties, a lack of developmental language skills, or the severity of their illness. Instruments with sufficient psychometric quality and pictorial support may address this communication challenge. The purpose of this review was to systematically search the published literature and identify validated and reliable self-report instruments available for children aged 5–18 years to use in the assessment of their anxiety to ensure they receive appropriate anxietyrelief intervention in hospital. What validated self-report instruments can children with cancer use to self-report anxiety in the hospital setting? Which of these instruments offer pictorial support? Eight instruments were identified, but most of the instruments lacked pictorial support. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL™) 3.0 Brain Tumor Module and Cancer Module proved to be useful in hospitalized children with cancer, as they provide pictorial support. It is recommended that faces or symbols be used along with the VAS, as pictures are easily understood by younger children. Future studies could include the adaptation of existing instruments in digital e-health tools. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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  • 3.
    Sahoo, Krushna Chandra
    et al.
    Health Technology Assessment in India (HTAIn) Regional Hub, ICMR—Regional Medical Research Centre, Bhubaneswar 751023, India.
    Soni, Rachna
    R D Gardi Medical College, Ujjain 456001, India.
    Kalyanasundaram, Madhanraj
    ICMR—National Institute of Epidemiology, Chennai 600077, India.
    Singh, Surya
    Division of Environmental Monitoring and Exposure Assessment (Water and Soil), ICMR—National Institute for Research in Environmental Health, Bhopal 462030, India.
    Parashar, Vivek
    R D Gardi Medical College, Ujjain 456001, India.
    Pathak, Ashish
    R D Gardi Medical College, Ujjain 456001, India; Department of Global Public Health, Health Systems and Policy (HSP): Improving Use of Medicines, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Purohit, Manju R.
    R D Gardi Medical College, Ujjain 456001, India; Department of Global Public Health, Health Systems and Policy (HSP): Improving Use of Medicines, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sabde, Yogesh
    Division of Environmental Epidemiology, ICMR—National Institute for Research in Environmental Health, Bhopal 462030, India.
    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Department of Global Public Health, Health Systems and Policy (HSP): Improving Use of Medicines, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sidney Annerstedt, Kristi
    Department of Global Public Health, Social Medicine Infectious Disease and Migration (SIM), Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Atkins, Salla
    Department of Global Public Health, Social Medicine Infectious Disease and Migration (SIM), Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden; Health Sciences and New Social Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, 33100 Tampere, Finland.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Diwan, Vishal
    Division of Environmental Monitoring and Exposure Assessment (Water and Soil), ICMR—National Institute for Research in Environmental Health, Bhopal 462030, India; Department of Global Public Health, Health Systems and Policy (HSP): Improving Use of Medicines, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dynamics of Household Waste Segregation Behaviour in Urban Community in Ujjain, India: A Framework Analysis2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 12, article id 7321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Waste segregation practices must be socially acceptable, affordable, context-specific, and participatory, which is essential for promoting waste segregation. Therefore, this study explored the urban community members’ motivation, opportunity, and household waste segregation ability. We performed a qualitative study in Ujjain city, India. Ten focus group discussions and eight in-depth interviews were conducted with female and male household members in residential and slum areas. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and translated. We used the thematic framework technique using the Motivation-Opportunity-Ability-Behaviour theory for analysis. Three themes were constructed: motivation, where household members are motivated to sort waste yet fear the consequences of improper sorting; ability, where household waste segregation is rapidly gaining acceptance as a social norm; and opportunities, involving convenient facilities and a social support system for household members towards waste segregation. This study contributes to developing a knowledge base on waste segregation behaviour and a repertoire to facilitate evidence-based management and policymaking. There is a need for educational intervention and women’s self-help groups’ involvement to develop community orientation and waste segregation literacy. Finally, this study emphasizes the importance of all three behavioural change components, i.e., motivation, opportunity, and ability, in managing sustainable waste segregation practices.

  • 4.
    Wikandari, R.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Mayningsih, I. C.
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Sari, M. D. P.
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Purwandari, F. A.
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Setyaningsih, W.
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Rahayu, E. S.
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Assessment of microbiological quality and mycotoxin in dried chili by morphological identification, molecular detection, and chromatography analysis2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing interest in spicy foods leads to the global demand for spices, particularly dried chili. This study aimed to assay both aflatoxin (AFs) and ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination using an integrative method of morphological identification, molecular detection, and chromatography analysis on dried chili provided from traditional and modern markets in Indonesia. The results showed that total fungal infection ranged from 1-408 × 103 CFU/g. Eighty percent of the chili obtained from both the traditional and the modern markets were infected by Aspergillus spp., in which 50% of the infections were identified as A. parasiticus and A. flavus. A complete set of targeted genes involved in AF production and OTA were detected in two isolates of A. flavus and one isolate of A. carbonarius, respectively. The levels of AFs B1, B2, and OTA in the contaminated dried chilies were in the range of 39.3–139.5 µg/kg, 2.6–33.3 µg/kg, and 23.7–84.6 µg/kg, respectively. In contrast, no AFs G1 and G2 were detected. This study showed that the fungal infection of Indonesian dried chili occurs both in the field and during storage; thus, it is suggested to implement good agricultural and handling processes. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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