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  • 1.
    Hultberg, Emelie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Lessons on business model scalability for circular economy in the fashion retail value chain: Towards a conceptual model2021Inngår i: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 28, s. 686-698Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy and especially circular business model (CBM), is currently being discussed as a way to enable the fashion industry's transition to sustainable business models wherein pollution and resource waste may be reduced. However, one of the prime reasons for a slow transition is lack of scalability of CBMs operating in the fashion retail value chain. What is lacking in the current discourse is research that summarises and condenses the literature on strategies for how scalability can be attained and what that means in context to CBMs where not only economic values are in focus. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to explore the main strategic approaches to scale business models and how these can be applied to CBMs in the fashion retail value chain. To do this, a two-part method is adopted consisting of a systematic literature review of 57 business models and scalability papers followed by a review of activities reported by 76 fashion retail companies on how these have, or are planning to, increase the scale of their CBM initiative. Our suggested model provides a basic understanding of strategies for business model scalability seen from four different business model design perspectives. These are further contextualised for CBMs in the fashion value chain and lessons learned are generated in the form of four central propositions. The propositions account on how organisations can leverage resources from their existing conventional business model for efficient scaling of their CBM initiative, how they can consider strategic partnerships to access complementary resources, while also embarking on adaptability by running business pilots either internally or by engaging in collaborative networks for industry-wide learnings and change.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Samsioe, Emma
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Fuentes, Christian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Digitalizing shopping routines: Re-organizing household practices to enable sustainable food provisioning2022Inngår i: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 29, s. 807-819Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    New digitally enabled modes of food provisioning are being developed. The aim of this paper is to examine, empirically illustrate, and conceptualize how and under what conditions these digital food platforms become routinized and what this means for the enabling of sustainable food consumption. Drawing on an ethnographically inspired study of three digital food provision platforms - i.e. meal box schemes, digitalized local food markets, and a food aggregator app – the paper explores how new digital food platforms are introduced and become routinized. The study shows that to create a shopping routine, specific combinations of meanings, materialities and competencies had to be interlinked and configured to enable the consistent reproduction of a shopping practice mode. Furthermore, the analysis also shows that there are multiple ways of carving out a space for new food shopping routines. The digital platforms studied and the modes of food shopping that they enabled were able to replace, complement or reconfigure already-established food shopping practices. Finally, the conclusions suggests that while these new modes of food provisioning became routinized, it was unlikely that they would remain so over time. Only a temporary stabilization was possible as built-in dynamics meant that the shopping routine was unable to last. This brings to the fore the challenges faced by those trying to promote new digitally enabled modes of sustainable food consumption. © 2021

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Southerton, Dale
    et al.
    Fuentes, Christian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Special section: Digital platforms and sustainable food consumption transitions2021Inngår i: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Weber, L.
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Energy and Technology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bartek, L.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Energy and Technology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Sjölund, A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Energy and Technology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, M.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Energy and Technology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Climate change impact of food distribution: The case of reverse logistics for bread in Sweden2023Inngår i: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 36, s. 386-396Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient and purposeful transport of food, from primary production to waste management, is essential to drive the necessary transition towards sustainable production and consumption of food within planetary boundaries. This is particularly the case for bread, one of the most frequently wasted food items in Europe. In Sweden, bread is often sold under a take-back agreement where bakeries are responsible for transportation up to the supermarket shelf and for the collection of unsold products. This provides an opportunity for reverse logistics, but creates a risk of inefficient transport that could reduce the environmental benefits of prevention and valorization of surplus bread. This study assessed the climate change impact of bread transport in Sweden and evaluated the impact of alternative food transport pathways. Life cycle assessment revealed the climate change impact of conventional bread transport, from bakery gate to waste management, to be on average 49.0 g CO2e per kg bread with 68 % deriving from long-distance transport, 26 % from short-distance delivery, and 6 % from waste transport. Evaluation of alternative bread transport pathways showed the highest climate savings with a collaborative transport approach that also reduced the need for small vehicles and decreased transport distances. The overall contribution of waste transport to the total climate impact of food transport was low for all scenario routes analyzed, suggesting that food waste management facilitating high-value recovery and valorization could be prioritized without increasing the climate impact due to longer transport. It has been claimed that conventional take-back agreements are responsible for most of the climate change impact related to bread transport, but we identified long distances between bakeries and retailers as the main contributor to transport climate impacts. © 2023 The Authors

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