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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Falk, P.
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Sundberg, B.
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Empowerment in the perioperative dialog2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe how the nurse anaesthetist empowers the patient in the perioperative dialogue. Design: A qualitative descriptive design with interviews with 12 nurse anaesthetist (NA). Method: A hermeneutic text interpretation with a foundation in Gibson's empowerment model. Result: The results highlight Gibson's nursing domain: Helper, Supporter, Counsellor, Educator, Resource Consultant, Resource Mobilizer, Facilitator, Enabler and Advocate. The overall understanding is revealed as a relationship can be built through closeness between the patient and the NA. The NA helps the patient master the situation by talking to and touching the patient. The patient is helped to find their own strengths and to cope with their fears. The patients decide over their own bodies. When the patients do not want to or cope with protecting themselves, the NA protects and represents the patient.

  • 2.
    Bazzi, May
    et al.
    Gothenburg University.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    Gothenburg University.
    Hellström, Mikael
    Gothenburg University and Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ahlberg, Karin
    Gothenburg University.
    Lundgren, Solveig M
    Gothenburg University.
    Team composition and staff roles in a hybrid operating room: A prospective study using video observations.2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 1245-1253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate team composition and staff roles in a hybrid operating room during endovascular aortic repairs.

    Design: Quantitative descriptive design.

    Methods: Nine endovascular aortic repairs procedures were video-recorded between December 2014 and September 2015. The data analysis involved examining the work process, number of people in the room and categories of staff and their involvement in the procedure.

    Results: The procedures were divided into four phases. The hybrid operating room was most crowded in phase 3 when the skin wound was open. Some staff categories were in the room for the entire procedure even if they were not actively involved. The largest number of people simultaneously in the room was 14.

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  • 3.
    Ekström‐Bergström, Anette
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences University West Trollhättan Sweden;Research Group Family Centered Health (FamCeH) University of Skövde Skövde Sweden;School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Stina
    Research Group Family Centered Health (FamCeH) University of Skövde Skövde Sweden;School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    Bäckström, Caroline
    Research Group Family Centered Health (FamCeH) University of Skövde Skövde Sweden;School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    The concept, importance and values of support during childbearing and breastfeeding – A discourse paper2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 156-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jutengren, Göran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Job demands and functional resources moderating assistant and Registered Nurses’ intention to leave2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 870-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To investigate how job demands and resources interact with each other to predict intention to leave among assistant nurses and Registered Nurses.

    Design

    Longitudinal study.

    Methods

    Questionnaire data were collected yearly during three years (October 2012-December 2014) from Registered Nurses (RN) and assistant nurses (N = 840) employed in Swedish hospitals. Associations and interaction effects of demands and resources were assessed with correlation analyses and regression models.

    Results

    Job demands predicted assistant nurses’ intentions to leave, while resources predicted RNs’ intention to leave. For RNs, several resources were functional in moderating the associations between demands and intention to leave: social support, vertical trust, and humanity moderated work pace and workflow moderated emotional demands. For assistant nurses, organizational clarity and interprofessional collaboration moderated emotional demands. None of the resources had a moderating effect on the associations between quantitative demands or illegitimate tasks and intention to leave.

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  • 5.
    Gamgam Leanderz, Åsa
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden;School of Health and Welfare Jönköping University Jönköping Sweden.
    Hallgren, Jenny
    School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    Henricson, Maria
    IMPROVE Department of Nursing School of Health and Welfare Jönköping University Jönköping Sweden.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    Bäckström, Caroline
    School of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    Parental‐couple separation during the transition to parenthood2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 2622-2636Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Tanja
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden;PreHospen Centre for Prehospital Research University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Karlsson, Pernilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden;Närhälsan Fristad Primary Health Care Center Borås Sweden.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    ‘Sometimes you need an eye-opener’: A qualitative study on nursing assistants' experiences of developing communication skills through an educational intervention on person-centred communication2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore nursing assistants' (NAs') experiences of developing communication skills while participating in an educational intervention on person-centred communication.

    Design

    A descriptive qualitative study was conducted.

    Methods

    Data were collected from interviews and written assignments before, during and after an educational intervention on person-centred communication targeting NAs in home care services. The data were analysed using a phenomenological approach. A total of 25 NAs participated in the study.

    Results

    The findings describe NAs' experiences concerning the communication skills needed for building relationships with older persons and handling emotionally challenging situations. The educational intervention increased their knowledge and awareness of the importance of communication skills and how such skills are developed and refined.

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  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Tanja
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hedén, Lena
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Communication in home care—A feasibility study of an educational intervention in self‐efficacy and job satisfaction2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1375-1382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore the feasibility of evaluating a novel educational intervention on person-centered communication for nursing assistants (NAs) in home care.

    Design

    A feasibility study with pre- and post-assessments.

    Methods

    Feasibility was assessed pre- and post-intervention, including evaluation of data collection procedures, completion rates and missing data in two questionnaires: Self-efficacy Questionnaire measuring communication skills and Measure of Job Satisfaction, analysed descriptively and statistically.

    Results

    The questionnaires were feasible and acceptable for the NAs to complete and understand. The pre- and post-assessments showed 83% and 61% completion rates, respectively, and a low proportion of missing data. Barriers for not participating in data collection were stress caused by staff shortages and high workload. Preliminary analysis of the questionnaires showed no significant difference pre- and post-intervention, even though an overall tendency of increased communication self-efficacy was observed. The NAs' self-efficacy ratings also revealed a ceiling effect.

     

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  • 8.
    Hedén, Lena E
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare, Uppsala University.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Pediatric Oncology, Uppsala University.
    Children's self‐reports of fear and pain levels during needle procedures2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 376-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The objective was to determine the levels of and potential relationships be‐ tween, procedure‐related fear and pain in children.

    Design: Clinical based cross‐sectional.

    Methods: Ninety children aged between 7–18 years were included consecutively and self‐reported levels of pain and fear on a 0–100 mm visual analogue scales (VAS) when undergoing routine needle insertion into a subcutaneously implanted intrave‐ nous port following topical anaesthesia.

    Results: The needle‐related fear level was reported to be as high as the needle‐re‐ lated pain level (mean VAS: 14 mm and 12 mm, respectively, N = 90). With fear as the dependent variable, age and pain were significantly associated and explained 16% of the variance. With pain as the dependent variable, fear was significantly associated and explained 11% of the variance. A post hoc analysis indicated that younger chil‐ dren reported their fear levels to be higher than their pain levels.

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  • 9.
    Heyn, Lena Günterberg
    et al.
    Center for Health and Technology University of South‐Eastern Norway Drammen Norway.
    Løkkeberg, Stine Torp
    Faculty of Health and Welfare Studies Østfold University College Halden Norway.
    Ellington, Lee
    College of Nursing University of Utah Salt Lake City Utah USA.
    van Dulmen, Sandra
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Nivel (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research) Utrecht Netherlands;Department of Primary and Community Care Radboud University Medicalcenter, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences Nijmegen Netherlands;Faculty of Caring Science Work Life and Social Welfare, University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Eide, Hilde
    Center for Health and Technology University of South‐Eastern Norway Drammen Norway.
    Understanding the role of positive emotions in healthcare communication – A realist review2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore how the expression of positive emotions during the interaction between patients and providers can cultivate the patient-provider relationship.

    Design

    We conducted a realist review guided by the Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Syntheses: Evolving Standards.

    Methods

    We systematically searched CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsychINFO and Scopus from inception to March 2019. Study selection and data extraction were performed blinded in pairs. From 3146 abstracts blinded in pairs, 15 papers were included and analysed. From each included paper, we extracted contexts, mechanisms and outcomes that were relevant to answer our research questions, creating a configuration between these elements (CMO configuration).

    Results

    Our findings suggest that in the contexts of person orientation and positive outlook, patient-provider relationships improve by communication conveying and eliciting positive emotions. We found six underlying mechanisms for this that form either direct or indirect pathways between the context and the outcome. 

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  • 10.
    Israelsson-Skogsberg, Åsa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences Lund University Lund Sweden;Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    A scoping review of older patients' health‐related quality of life, recovery and well‐being after intensive care2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    In the present study, we aimed to determine how Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), recovery (function and capacity in daily life) and well-being are followed up and characterised in persons ≥65 years of age who were being cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU).

    Design

    A scoping review.

    Methods

    CINAHL, MEDLINE (Ovid) and PsycINFO databases were searched in October 2021. 20 studies met the inclusion criteria. The scoping review followed the principles outlined by Arksey and O'Malley, and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) checklist and Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) framework were used.

    Results

    Results are presented under five subheadings: Study characteristics, Type of studies, Methods for follow-up, health-related quality of life, and Recovery. Time seems to be an important factor regarding HRQoL among older patients being cared for in an ICU, with most elderly survivors perceiving their HRQoL as acceptable after 1 year. Nevertheless, several studies showed patients' willingness to be readmitted to the ICU if necessary, indicating that life is worth fighting for.

    Patient or Public Contribution

    Due to the design of the study, this study involves no patient or public contribution.

     

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  • 11.
    Kauppi, Wivica
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jiménez-Herrera, Maria F.
    Nursing Department, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), Tarragona, Spain.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Patients' lived experiences of breathlessness prior to prehospital care – A phenomenological study2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 2179-2189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Aims and objectives The study aimed to describe how breathlessness is experienced by patients prior to prehospital care. Design A qualitative phenomenological design. Methods Lifeworld interviews were conducted with 14 participants. The analysis was carried out within the descriptive phenomenological framework. Results The essential meaning of the breathlessness phenomenon is described as an existential fear in terms of losing control over one?s body and dying, which involves a battle to try to regain control. This is further described by four constituents: being in an unknown body, striving to handle the situation, the ambiguity of having loved ones close and reaching the utmost border. Conclusions Patients describe a battling for survival. It is at the extreme limit of endurance that patients finally choose to call the emergency number. It is a challenge for the ambulance clinician (AC) to support these patients in the most optimal fashion.

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  • 12.
    Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Institution of Health Sciences University of Skövde Skövde Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences Örebro University Örebro Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Institution of Health Sciences Red Cross University Stockholm Sweden.
    The clinical learning environment during clinical practice in postgraduate district nursing students' education: a cross‐sectional study2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 879-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe and compare the clinical learning environment in community-based home care and primary health care in postgraduate district nursing students' education.

    Design

    Cross-sectional study design.

    Methods

    A convenience sample of postgraduate district nursing students was derived from five Swedish universities in 2016 and 2017.

    Results

    The postgraduate district nursing students were generally satisfied with the clinical learning environment in their clinical placement. In clinical placement, several factors affected the students' opportunities to learn, such as sufficiently meaningful learning situations with multidimensional content. A working environment that imposed psychosocial strain and high levels of stress among the staff negatively affected the students' learning. To further improve their learning from clinical practices, the students need preceptors who have the skills and competence required to support more advanced reflections and critical thinking on caring situations.

     

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  • 13.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Nygårdh, Annette
    Jönköping University, HHJ, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping University, The Jönköping Academy for Improvement of Health and Welfare.
    To support self-management for people with long-term conditions: The effect on shared decision-making, empowerment and coping after participating in group-learning sessions2022In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 2444-2453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Interventions that support patients to handle the emotional and medical aspects of a long-term health condition is important. One way is to use peer-support groups, to help patients solving problems, increasing their knowledge and making decisions.

    Aim: was to investigate the impact on shared decision-making, empowerment and coping after participation in group-learning sessions for patients with long-term conditions (N = 42).

    Design: An intervention following a health education programme based on group-learning sessions was established. Eight different programmes were held in five different departments at a regional county hospital in Sweden.

    Methods: Questionnaires were analysed using paired-sample t-test.

    Results: Results showed that patients might have better opportunities to be more active during their patient encounter after attending the group learning sessions. Interventions directed to patient activation may be one key in future healthcare management, especially concerning long-term conditions. Empowering patients is central in healthcare, and using different approaches is important.

    What does this paper contribute to the wider global clinical community? 

    • Patients with long-term conditions should be encouraged to share their knowledge to others, which can give support in managing their disease
    • Group-learning sessions can add a perspective of patients' lived knowledge which is one of the key aspects concerning treatment of patients with long-term conditions
  • 14.
    Sterner, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    A study of factors that predict novice nurses’ perceived ability to provide care in acute situations2021In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1958-1969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore factors that predict novice nurses’ trust in their ability to provide care in acute situations and identify factors that are related to their perceived ability to make clinical judgements in acute situations.

    Design

    Exploratory cross-sectional study. 

    Method

    Novice nurses employed within somatic care in Swedish hospitals completed an online survey.  Univariate analysis facilitated exploration of the data and identification of predictor variables with the greatest association to; 1/ trust in their own ability (1 item), 2/ ability to make clinical judgements (4 items). Multivariate binary logistic regression modelling was used to model the likelihood of outcomes based on each predictor variable. 

    Results

    The two most important predictors related to trust in ability to provide care were; duration of work experience and participation in acute situations during nursing education. For clinical judgement, duration of work experience was significant in all four models and experience of acute situations post-graduation was significant in two models.

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  • 15.
    Zhou, Lihua
    et al.
    School of Nursing Anhui Medical University Hefei China.
    Hong, Jingfang
    School of Nursing Anhui Medical University Hefei China.
    Henricson, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Qin, Rumeng
    Department of Nursing First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University Hefei China.
    Dai, Yu
    Department of General Surgery (Third Ward) Suzhou Hospital of Anhui Medical University Suzhou China.
    Enskär, Karin
    Department of Women's and Children's Health Uppsala University Uppsala Sweden.
    Stenmarker, Margaretha
    Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences University of Gothenburg Sahlgrenska Academy Gothenburg Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare Jönköping University Jönköping Sweden.
    Factors associated with posttraumatic growth among spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer: A cross‐sectional study2023In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 630-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to explore the factors that are associated with posttraumatic growth among spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer.

    Design

    A cross-sectional descriptive study.

    Methods

    A convenience sample of 312 spouses of women diagnosed with gynaecological cancer was recruited from two comprehensive hospitals in China, from March 2018 to March 2020. Demographic characteristics, cancer-related characteristics, posttraumatic growth, perceived social support and coping were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were performed. The methods were guided by the STROBE checklist.

    Results

    The mean score of posttraumatic growth was 46.7 (standard deviation = 16.7). The associated factors of posttraumatic growth were spouses' age, perceived social support, problem-focused coping, dysfunctional coping (e.g. denial) and cancer treatment received by partners, which accounted for 34% of total posttraumatic growth score.

    Patient or public contribution

    All participants contributed to the conducting of this study by completing self-reported questionnaires.

     

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