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  • 1.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Ancok, Djamaludin
    Ramdhani, Neila
    Archer, Trevor
    Cultural influences upon health, affect, self-esteem and impulsiveness: An Indonesian-Swedish comparison2013In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines several personal attributes that distinguish the personal profiles of individuals, from Indonesian and Swedish cultures, according to self-reports of positive and negative effect, stress and energy, self-esteem, hospital anxiety and depression, dispositional optimism and health. Indonesian participants expressed both more PA and more NA than Swedish participants but less stress and a higher energy-stress quotient than the Swedish participants. Additionally, the former expressed a higher level of optimism and self-esteem, but also more depression, and less impulsiveness than the latter. Younger participants expressed less positive affect and more negative affect and impulsiveness than older participants who expressed both more stress and a higher energy stress quotient. Regression analyses indicated that PA was predicted by optimism and health whereas NA was predicted by anxiety and depression and impulsiveness and counter predicted by health. The present findings are discussed according to the notion of emotional regulation according to which individuals differ in their use of emotion regulation strategies such as reappraisal and suppression, and these individual differences have implications for affect, well-being, and social relationships.

  • 2.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Ramdhani, Neila
    Why you and not me? Expressions of envy in Indonesia and Sweden.2014In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, Vol. 3, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to describe experience of envy in two different cultures, Indonesia and Sweden. Envy is a feeling that most people have experienced and mostly regards as shameful. The concept relates to a variety of feeling that shows its complexity. The result shows that envy had a wider meaning in the Indonesian language than in Swedish, and consisted of emotional words that were rare among the Swedish respondents. The Swedish respondents’ descriptions were, with few exceptions, connected to a malicious (ill will) meaning while it was obvious that the Javanese respondents used also the concept of benign envy (without ill will). Jealousy and envy seemed to overlap each other more in Bahasa Indonesia than in the Swedish use of the words. The latter had a distinct word for schadenfreude that was lacking in Bahasa Indonesia. For the Swedish respondents, wanting to have what another person possesses was a central element of envy, for example prosperity or competence. The Javanese respondents stressed relationships, achievements and personal characteristics’ as main causes for envy. Both the Swedish and Javanese respondents reported that a person who they knew and with whom they had an established relationship, such as a friend or a fellow student, had envied them and the causes for this were about the same as their own.

  • 3.
    Nur’aini A’yuninnisa, Rizqui
    et al.
    Gadjah Mada University Indonesia.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Subjective well-being of Indonesian and Swedish collegestudents: A cross-cultural study on happiness2019In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, ISSN 2243-7681, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 25-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore and compare levels of subjective well-being and contributing factors that promote happiness in two countries, Indonesia and Sweden. A total of 104 Swedish and 112 Indonesian college students participated in this study. The instruments used were Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS; Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988), Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), and an open-ended question, “What are the three most important things in your life that make you happy?” Data analyses were conducted in two phases for qualitative and quantitative data. Two major themes, interdependent and dependent factors of happiness, emerged from the qualitative data. Results showed that respondents from both countries reported interdependent factors as their main happiness contributor. The quantitative result demonstrated no significant effects on subjective well-being for culture and its interaction with the happiness factor. Instead, only the happiness factor had a significant effect on subjective well-being. People with interdependent happiness were happier than those who pursue independent happiness factors. This study observed no difference in the level of subjective well-being and happiness factors across the cultures.

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