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  • 1.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Small-series supply network configuration priorities and challenges in the EU textile and apparel industry2022In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Technology and market pressures are encouraging localized and small-series production in customer-driven industries. The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand the supply chain-, product- and process-design factors for small-series production in EU's textile and apparel industry, to understand configuration decisions, priorities and challenges. 

     Design/methodology/approach 

    An interview study was undertaken with ten companies that represent diverse small-series production models and value chain roles. Interview data was analysed to identify supply network configuration characteristics, decision priorities and challenges. 

     Findings

    Three small-series production models emerged from the analysis, differing with respect to adoption of process postponement and customization. The findings confirm and extend past research regarding diverse decision priorities and product, process, supply chain structure/relationship configurations. Challenges identified relate to planning (priorities) and implementation (configuration). Whereas competence availability and digital technology challenges are common, several difficulties are linked to production model like tensions related to priorities and small volumes, which are not found with customization. 

     Research limitations/implications 

    Future research can make comparisons with other industry and location contexts; adopt dynamic approaches to distinguish between design and reconfiguration processes; and address indicated paradoxical-tensions. 

     Practical implications 

    The study findings can provide guidance for companies regarding identification of priorities and management of (planning/implementation) challenges impacting small-series production in T&A. 

     Originality/value 

    The paper brings a configuration perspective at the supply chain level to the problem of small-series production implementation, which demands holistic and context-specific understanding.

  • 2.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Extended responsibility through servitization in PSS: An exploratory study of used-clothing sector2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 453-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The global textile-fashion industry is resource inefficient thus requiring higher product- service systems (PSS) intervention. Further, insight of how PSS extends corporate responsibility is rather limited; knowledge of which may contribute towards increased PSS viability. The purpose of this paper is to explore how companies operating with used-clothing PSS extend their responsibilities through servitization.

    Design/methodology/approach – An exploratory study of seven companies operating with various used-clothing PSS is conducted through semi-structured interviews and supplementary document studies.

    Findings – Six dominant ways through which servitization drives responsibility in used-clothing PSSare identified. These are through: value-adding services, product leverage, collaborative partnership, information transparency, awareness and platform-enabled networking. Two trade-offs exist in terms of their focus on physical process or digitalization, and developed by honing core competency or collaborative partnership. Further three differentiating attributes underlie these mechanisms for: raising awareness and/or improving transparency, collaboration in value creation and/or in promoting consumption, and product ownership and/or leverage.

    Research limitations/implications – A wide range of used-clothing PSS exists each in its own way extending responsibility. In-depth studies are required to investigate the relationship between servitization and extended responsibility for diverse PSS-types and on type of responsibilities they address.

    Practical implications – By identifying the key mechanisms or ways and their underlying characteristics companies can identify new servitization forms and ways to extend their responsibility, identify best practices and establish viability beyond the traditional measures, e.g. financial.

    Originality/value – So far no studies have investigated the role of servitization in PSS and how it extends corporate responsibility, especially in industries like textile-fashion, where both resource efficiency and responsibility is low.

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  • 3.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Shen, Bin
    Glorious Sun School of Business and Management, Donghua University.
    Sandberg, Erik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University.
    Circular fashion supply chain management: exploring impediments and prescribing future research agenda2019In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 298-307Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Paras, Manoj Kumar
    et al.
    National Institute of Fashion Technology, Kangra, India.
    Wang, Lichuan
    Graduate School, Soochow University, Suzhou, China.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Supply Chain Management and Social Responsibility, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    A sustainable model based on genetic algorithm for garment redesign process2023In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 870-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This study proposes a garment modularization model based on an interactive genetic algorithm. The suggested model consists of extraction and identification of parts and the determination and implementation of connections. Rules and corresponding mathematical equations have been formulated for the part's extractions from the discarded products and connections for the redesigned products.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Sustainability entices scholars and practitioners while referring to reducing waste to control environmental degradation. One of the ways to safeguard natural resources is to increase the reuse of old or discarded products. The current study focuses on the redesign process to improve the reuse of products.

    Findings

    The intelligent system proposed based on the modularization techniques is expected to simplify and quantify the redesign process. The model can further help in the minimization of wastage and environmental degradation.

    Originality/value

    Presently, manual decisions are taken by the designers based on their memory, experience and intuition to extract and join the parts.

     

  • 5.
    Sirilertsuwan, Petchprakai
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hjelmgren, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Hanken School of Economics.
    Exploring Current Enablers and Barriers for Sustainable Proximity Manufacturing2019In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, no 4, p. 551-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Amidst offshoring and reshoring trends, the purpose of this paper is to explore why business practitioners, especially from the labour-intensive clothing industry, choose to manufacture some products in proximity to the high-cost European market. Moreover, the rise of sustainability concerns led us to further explore whether these reasons relate to triple bottom line (TBL): business, environment and society.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The content analysis was adopted for within-case and cross-case analysis of data from semi-structured interviews of managers from 12 clothing companies.

    Findings

    Within-case analysis showed enablers and barriers (factors) of proximity manufacturing within each company’s characteristics under TBL. Cross-case analysis showed the most-mentioned enablers (high-quality suppliers, short lead-time and fast replenishment) and barriers (expensive production cost and lack of industrial set-up and seamstresses). The findings revealed both common and different factors from existing studies.

    Research limitations/implications

    Besides being motives for companies to bring manufacturing back to Europe, the results can be used by researchers and companies to develop criteria and performance measures of manufacturing locations for enhancing the TBL sustainability. Future research may explore different locations and industries for possibilities of proximity–manufacturing generalisation.

    Social implications

    Findings show that governments could focus on eliminating barriers of proximity manufacturing and creating favourable institutional infrastructure for the European clothing industry and sustainability.

    Originality/value

    This paper highlights updated proximity–manufacturing factors from practices in relation to TBL sustainability, including support for proximity manufacturing as a practice for TBL enhancement.

  • 6.
    Sörum, Niklas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gianneschi, Marcus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The role of access-based apparel in processes of consumer identity construction2023In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 27, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of the study is to analyse negotiations about ownership and style in access-based apparel related to processes of identity construction.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study applies a qualitative and interpretative method and relies on semi-structured depth interviews and focus group interviews with clothing library users as the main data source. The conceptual context of this paper is that of consumer culture theory approaches to consumer identity construction and the role of object ownership in consumer identity projects.

    Findings

    The empirical analysis highlights how processes of consumer identity construction related to symbolic values of clothing and self-possession mechanisms related to ownership are negotiated in encounters with access-based types of fashion consumption with effects on potential consumer adoption of access-based forms of consumption. The findings are structured in six analytical themes.

    Social implications

    There are several aspects of this research which are of relevance to the sustainability agenda and which have societal implications. Identity has been identified, in previous research, as a key conceptual tool for exploring, predicting and deepening the understanding of pro-environmental and sustainable behaviours. As such, if the aim is to strengthen the commitment of societies to environmental and sustainable behaviours, then this will require greater knowledge of consumers' identities and meaning-making processes. This is a challenge, not least in terms of recognizing the barriers identified in this study as relating to issues of consumer identity construction.

    Originality/value

    This study reveals multiple possibilities as well as barriers for implementing collaborative apparel consumption schemes in a fashion and apparel context. Some of the barriers might be explained by clothing's emotional character and close relationship to identity formation. Furthermore, the participants questioned whether access and renting services could substitute the meanings of owning. In conclusion, the authors argue that clothing may be a challenging type of goods to integrate in liquid forms of consumption and findings point out complexities amongst fashion-conscious consumers regarding meaning and identity values of collaborative apparel consumption. Theoretical contributions of an interpretative consumer identity approach for understanding barriers as well as possibilities for consumer adoption of access-based fashion are developed in the concluding sections of the article.

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