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  • 1.
    Blomgren, Roger
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Autonomy or democratic cultural policy:that is the question2012In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 519-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that the concept of democracy, i.e. a political system that reflects the will of the people either directly or through representatives, is never or very seldom emphasised as an essential value in cultural policy debates or in cultural policy research. Instead the concept of autonomy is often put forward as the principal value when cultural policies are debated. Autonomy is central to many democratic theories and in cultural matters it is often described as the arm’s length principle. In this article, I will lean on institutional theories to discuss and explain why democracy in the classical sense never has been put forward as an important value and why autonomy usually is. I will also undertake a critical examination of the autonomy concept, as it has been defined in cultural policy.

  • 2.
    Blomgren, Roger
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The origins of the arts council movement; philanthropy and policy2018In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Frenander, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    No, Discord, or, an Area without Significant Political Stakes? Some Reflections on Swedish Post-war Cultural Policy Discourse2007In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 393-406Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Frenander, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Review: cool capitalism2011In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 128-130Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Lindsköld, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Review of: Wright, David. Understanding cultural taste: sensation, skill and sensibility. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 20152016In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lindström Sol, Sofia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Ekholm, David
    CKS centre for municipality studies.
    Mobilising non-participant youth: using sport and culture in local government policy to target social exclusion2019In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of sport and cultural practices in policy initiatives tends to be assessed in both cases in terms of their assumed social benefits. However, the areas of sport and culture are often understood separately in research. Through an analysis of interviews with key local policymakers and civil servants in two Swedish municipalities, the aim of this article is to explore how sport and culture are formed as means to promote social policy objectives regarding young people. In addition, we reflect on the political significance of this in relation to the development of local policy. The analysis demonstrates how a discourse of urban segregation and unequal opportunities underpins actions to mobilise non-participant and at-risk youth. This is achieved by establishing centres for sport and culture, and by enabling an educational approach which focuses on participation, empowerment and good citizenship. Reasons for mobilising practices involving culture and sport overlap, though each area of policy appears to be differently underpinned by discourses of enlightenment and conformity. Differences in emphasis between the discourses on sport and culture are discussed in relation to scientific discourse on the social utility of each policy area.

  • 7.
    Nolin, Jan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Cultural Policy by Proxy: Internet-based cultural consumption as a copygray zone2014In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 273-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article pursues the assumption that cultural policy has been disallowed regulation of cultural rights on the Internet. Instead, early initiatives on IntellectualProperty Rights have prescribed cultural policy viewpoints. Restrictions of cultural rights can be connected to gray areas of ethics and markets. The first aim of the article is to articulate concepts useful for discussing gray phenomenon given restrictions of cultural rights on the Internet. The second aim is to critically analyze the historical development of ‘copygray’ areas. These can also be positioned within the context of an evolving surveillance society. The rights of the state and of corporations to large-scale quantities of personal information have been generously enlarged through lack of restrictions relating to social media. Thus, while cultural rights become restricted, citizens are simultaneously deprived of rights to control personal information. Both of these developments can be situated within legal and ethical gray areas.

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