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  • 1.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Humanism and creativity in restructured adult education in Sweden2006In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education restructuring is often based on the claim that markets have been shown to efficiently distribute goods to individuals who need and desire them, and that services should therefore be altered so that the market can also become the ultimate arbiter of what is included in them as well. However, restructuring has also been said to have negative effects on education values such as humanism and creativity. The present article has been developed from an ethnographic case study in relation to these values. It is supported by recent ethnographic research in adult Swedish language courses for immigrants (SFI) within a particular municipal region in Sweden.

  • 2.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Identifying and comparing Scandinavian ethnography2010In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been a significant growth in the volume of research production in education ethnography in Scandinavia due partly to a regionally financed network. The present article makes some comparisons between Scandinavian and other education research contexts in relation to aspects of general ethnographic design to try to analyse this production. It suggests some typical points of identity for Scandinavian educational ethnography, such as a distinct role for theories in fieldwork. But it also suggests that these characteristics are even apparent outside Scandinavia. Some blind-spots in ethnography are also suggested around quantitative aspects, but again, these are not unique. Scandinavian ethnographic research in education is broadly influenced by a range of different traditions in different parts of the region that have travelled with key people and from place to place, but it is also noted that there is seepage between ethnography and other traditions.

  • 3.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Maybe one in a hundred or one in a thousand in theneoliberal, new-managerial university!: Aesthetics of experience and the question of transgressivecritical thinking2020In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trangression is an act of challenging boundaries that separateapparently distinct oppositional categories objects. Examples arecategories such as such as civilised/primitive, male/female, master/servant, Lordship/bondage. The article deals with suchtransgressions related to the evolution of class consciousnesstransgressive critical thinking. It is said to be particularly importantand at risk in higher education today, as performativity reforms haveclosed the spaces for transgressive reflexivity, making it difficult forstudents to make sense of the possibilities and costs for the self thathigher education can create. However, although the nowprofessionally managed entrepreneurial university might appear toform a difficult space for developing critical thinking, critique is alsoa basis for the expansion of capitalism in the university, and throughtransferability this can create spaces for critical reflection.

  • 4.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Department of Education and Special Education, Gothenburg University.
    Personalisation and the education commodity: a meta-ethnographic analysis2017In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, no 2, p. 148-164, article id 252306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a meta-ethnography of research about schools, school experiences and learning following the recent (post-market) introduction of personalisation policies in Swedish schools. It pays particular attention to issues of equity. Tensions between personalisation, privatisation and equity are discussed and it is noted that personalisation policies seem to have been unable to evade the pressures of commodification or overcome the difficulties of social reproduction in education.

  • 5.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Gothenburg.
    Personalisation and the education commodity: a meta-ethnographic analysis2017In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    The Social Construction of Student Learning Preferences in School Classrooms2008In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 3, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Eriksson, A.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    The relationship between ethical positions and methodological approaches: A Scandanavian perspective2010In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 5, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, based on reading ethnographic theses, books and articles and conversations with nine key informants, we have tried to describe how research ethics are approached and written about in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. The article confirms findings from previous research that there are different methodological forms of ethnography there. It adds that although ethical descriptions can of course be described by using formal-philosophical ethical-typographies there is also a relationship between ethical holdings and methodological approaches. The different approaches reflect critical, feminist, interactionist and micro-ethnographic forms. The ethical types have been termed utilitarian, deontological, relational and ecological. The main conclusions are that the research we have analysed has always considered ethical issues and that these considerations often in some sense reflect national ethical guidelines from research authorities and financiers. A drift can also be discerned away from utilitarian ethics to relational and ecological thinking in accordance with methodological and ideological commitments and beliefs.

  • 8.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Eriksson, Anita
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    The relationship between ethical positions and methodological approaches: a Scandinavian perspective2010In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 129-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, based on reading ethnographic theses, books and articles and conversations with nine key informants, we have tried to describe how research ethics are approached and written about in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. The article confirms findings from previous research that there are different methodological forms of ethnography there. It adds that although ethical descriptions can of course be described by using formal-philosophical ethical-typographies there is also a relationship between ethical holdings and methodological approaches. The different approaches reflect critical, feminist, interactionist and micro-ethnographic forms. The ethical types have been termed utilitarian, deontological, relational and ecological. The main conclusions are that the research we have analysed has always considered ethical issues and that these considerations often in some sense reflect national ethical guidelines from research authorities and financiers. A drift can also be discerned away from utilitarian ethics to relational and ecological thinking in accordance with methodological and ideological commitments and beliefs.

  • 9.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Eriksson, Anita
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    The relationship between ethical positions and metodological approaches: a scandinavian perspective2010In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 129-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, based on reading ethnographic theses, books and articles and conversations with nine key informants, we have tried to describe how research ethics are approached and written about in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. The article confirms findings from previous research that there are different methodological forms of ethnography there. It adds that although ethical descriptions can of course be described by using formal-philosophical ethical-typographies there is also a relationship between ethical holdings and methodological approaches. The different approaches reflect critical, feminist, interactionist and micro-ethnographic forms. The ethical types have been termed utilitarian, deontological, relational and ecological. The main conclusions are that the research we have analysed has always considered ethical issues and that these considerations often in some sense reflect national ethical guidelines from research authorities and financiers. A drift can also be discerned away from utilitarian ethics to relational and ecological thinking in accordance with methodological and ideological commitments and beliefs.

  • 10.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Lunneblad, Johannes
    Ethnographic Investigations of Issues of Race in Scandinavian Education Research2011In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 29-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we aim to present an overview of some of the ways in which issues of race and ethnicity are represented and researched in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. Several things are suggested. Amongst them is that educational ethnographers in Scandinavia rarely use the concept of race. The term (im)migrant(s) is used instead and the relationships in education between Scandinavians and (im)migrants and between educational results and (im)migrant culture and/or languages is often in focus. Integration has also been an issue. History may give an indication as to how this may have become so. Research on immigrants, immigration and integration has been promoted in national policies and these policies highlight language, culture and diversity but for historical and political reasons they often avoid ethnicity and ignore race and color altogether. Moreover, when ethnicity is used it seems to be used more as an ontological marker than as an epistemological concept. This has repercussions we suggest for understanding the politics of race and ethnicity relations in relation to education.

  • 11.
    Dovemark, Marianne
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    How private "everyday racism" and public "racism denial" contribute to unequal and discriminatory educational experiences2013In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 16-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study uses ethnographic research from four classes in secondary school as well as from two groups in upper secondary school, to examine everyday racism as an element of the daily institutional lives of students and teachers. The study is based on long-term participant observation and 89 interviews. These were all audio-recorded and transcribed. In Sweden the education of ethnic groups is couched in a discourse of integration and inclusion. However, the research presented shows that the aims of integration and inclusion were not achieved. Unequal and discriminatory educational experiences operated through two related actions: by private everyday racism and through public racism denial.

  • 12.
    Dovemark, Marianne
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Gothenburg.
    From Learning to Labour to learning for Precarity2016In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Lunneblad, Johannes
    et al.
    Asplund Carlsson, Maj
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Performativity as pretence. A study of testing practices in a compulsory school in Sweden2012In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 297-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim in this article is to analyse the impact of the standardised test on classroom practices in grade 5 in a compulsory school in western Sweden. In our analysis, the use of the concept of the pedagogical device (Bernstein 1996) provides a framework for understanding how high-stakes, standardised testing regulates classroom discourse and teachers’ and students’ classroom behaviours. The study was conducted during 2006–2007 as part of a larger ethnographic inquiry. The results reveal how the demands of the test impact upon the daily work in the classroom. In the neo-liberal approach to governance, standardised tests have become an important measure of quality. School practices run the risk of being viewed as valuable, only relative to the performance of teachers and students at the individual level. This view shifts the focus from a discussion about a societal responsibility to ensure that all children have equitable access to education, to a debate centred on the individual's responsibility to perform. The analysis reveals that the test was not carried out as intended. However, both teacher and the students respond to the test situation and the results as if it had been and as if the test really mattered.

  • 14.
    Player-Koro, Catarina
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Marginalising students' understanding of mathematics through performative priorities: a Bernsteinian perspective2011In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 325-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from data produced during subject theory lectures and in conversional interviews with students from an ongoing ethnographic study of mathematics teacher education at a Swedish University. Using Bernsteins’ language of description of the pedagogic device the article describes how the aims of teacher education to re-contextualise mathematical education towards greater student subject knowledge is thwarted by a strongly classified and framed practice that obstructs student teachers from developing a vertical knowledge structure in mathematics due to performative priorities. The mathematical knowledge to which students are subjected takes more the form of a horizontal discourse and this is problematic for their knowledge development. A horizontal discourse reduces student access to important forms of knowledge by which they can challenge tradition and consciously change their practice.

  • 15.
    Tummons, Jonathan
    et al.
    School of Education, Durham University.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Ethnography, materiality, and the principle of symmetry: problematising anthropocentrism and interactionism in the ethnography of education2019In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we draw on actor-network theory (ANT) in order to challenge the methodological and empirical orthodoxies of anthropocentrism and interactionism that have long informed dominant discourses of ethnographic work. We use ANT to open new possibilities for understanding education as emergent in relational fields where non-human forces are as equally necessary as and possess an agency equivalent to, human forces: the principle of symmetry. We argue that this generates important conceptual as well as political possibilities in constituting different possible outcomes in the accomplishment of ethnographies of education. We draw attention to the problematic of the decentring of the human subject and the critical investigation of the interface between people and objects that frame this special issue, and also propose a methodological response framed by a commitment to empirical research through ethnography as well as a theoretical response framed by relational materialism, operationalised here through recourse to ANT.

  • 16. Tummons, Jonathan
    et al.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Ethnography, materiality, and theprinciple of symmetry: problematising anthropocentrism and interactionism in the ethnography ofeducation2019In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we draw on actor-network theory (ANT) in order tochallenge the methodological and empirical orthodoxies ofanthropocentrism and interactionism that have long informeddominant discourses of ethnographic work. We use ANT to opennew possibilities for understanding education as emergent inrelational fields where non-human forces are as equally necessaryas and possess an agency equivalent to, human forces: theprinciple of symmetry. We argue that this generates importantconceptual as well as political possibilities in constituting differentpossible outcomes in the accomplishment of ethnographies ofeducation. We draw attention to the problematic of thedecentring of the human subject and the critical investigation ofthe interface between people and objects that frame this specialissue, and also propose a methodological response framed by acommitment to empirical research through ethnography as wellas a theoretical response framed by relational materialism,operationalised here through recourse to ANT.

1 - 16 of 16
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