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  • 1.
    Berglin, Lena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Cederwall, Sara Lotta
    Hallnäs, Lars
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Jönsson, Birgitta
    Kvaal, Anne Karine
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Nordström, Maria
    Peterson, Barbro
    Thornquist, Clemens
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Interaction Design Methods in Fashion Design Teaching2007Ingår i: The Nordic Textile Journal 2006-07, p. 26-51Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The expressiveness of use is of focal interest in fashion design, which makes the perspective of act design important in learning/teaching. The objective of the project presented here was to introduce interaction design methods in fashion design teaching to make act design explicit throughout the different stages of the design process in a systematic manner; to develop a general workshop curriculum in experimental fashion design focusing on the expressiveness of wearing and use. A series of test workshops were implemented to provide a foundation for reflection and critical discussions. The main results, motivated by workshop evaluations, consist of theoretical models for a systematic development of workshop exercises in fashion design aesthetics.

  • 2.
    Bondesson, Amy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Persson, Anna
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Worbin, Linda
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Costumes and Wallhanging2009Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This work deals with Smart Textiles in interaction with the body. We design textiles and outfits as tools that can influence fashion and textile design. Central to our work is that artistic envisioning can point to new possibilities and values, in which we want to stress the importance of combining traditional materials and methods with contemporary and future functions in order to obtain sustainable ideas. The film documents a performance, where dancers create a link between the body, the textile material and the room surrounding the body. The textile material and the garment are to inspire movement that, in turn, creates development; when a person wears the garment and moves in a certain way or touches other persons, the visual expression of the room changes through an electronic signal. In this case, the colour of the pattern of the textile draping changes to the static pattern that is printed on the person’s outfit. The point of the show was to show possibilities of non-static and dynamic design through scenic expression.

  • 3.
    Bondesson, Amy
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Worbin, Linda
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Persson, Anna
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Textile dimensions: an expressive textile interface2009Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Computation and new materials are entering the world of textiles, challenging our view on the textile material. As new techniques and electrically conductive fibres enable the design of textile circuits and computationally active textiles [2], the areas of smart textile design and interaction design start to merge. Wearable computing [cf.1], the notion of moving computational tools directly onto the body, might have been the first approach to bring computation technology closer to the area of clothing.. In an approach to investigate new enhanced forms of expressional interaction through textiles, the relationship between tactile and visual aesthetical properties are explored in the present paper. Textile Dimensions, an interactive set of textiles, shows how clothes and textiles become interfaces themselves, able to sense and react on external stimuli in expressive ways.

  • 4.
    Carbonaro, Simonetta
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Design, Society, Resilience2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Consuming less but better or the best – this would be a sign of wisdom. The wisdom of resilience, which tells us, that at the end of a story there is always the beginning of a story, but a better story...

  • 5.
    Carbonaro, Simonetta
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Dramatic changes in society ask for a revolution in retail2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Carbonaro, Simonetta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Votava, Christian
    Wenn Konsum aus dem Zirkus der Emotionen ausbricht2012Ingår i: …und schopping-center, Das Lesebuch und Nachdenkbuch / [ed] K. Schneider, EKAZENT, Wien , 2012, s. 262-283Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions as an experience of the senses are not the same emotions as a manifestation of feelings. Lifestyle and Experiential Marketing understand emotions as intangible added value and create a world of sensuality without meaning. In these imaginary worlds consumers have begun to look for reliable clues on the lookout, they have developed a deep longing for the authentic. Another dealing with emotions is presented, which is influenced by the desire of people for meaning and identity, and a new understanding of marketing and communications. Based on the socio-cultural model of consumption and strategy of real quality, it shows how to operate successfully in our troubled presence on the market.

  • 7. Christoforidou, Despina
    et al.
    Olander, Elin
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Warell, Anders
    Good Taste vs Good Design: A tug of war in the light of Bling2012Ingår i: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 185-202Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Some products are considered ‘bad taste’ and therefore of less value. However, if we focus on what a product does with and for its users, rather than on what a product is, we can disregard superficial statements based on taste and instead get a better understanding of good design. This reasoning is based on the relationship between ‘good taste’ and ‘good design’, terms which are sometimes confused and treated as synonyms. In this article, we explore the tension between ‘good taste’ and ‘good design’ and how designers can use that tension in the design process. We consider ‘good taste’ to be rooted in a subjective context of inherent values, whereas ‘good design’ arises from competence and is based on professional skill. In this paper, ‘bad taste’ is exemplified by products associated with the lifestyles of rap artists and the subculture of bling. Our experience is that bling products often generate strong feelings and opinions and are dismissed by many as ‘bad taste’ because their appearance is incompatible with what is perceived to be ‘good design’. In the context of a course on trends, industrial design students were given the task of exploring how bling products are perceived in everyday life. Their views on bling were compatible with how bling is presented in the media. The students perceived bling products to be far from what is regarded as ‘good taste’ within their own culture. Consequently, they were unable to regard bling as a source of inspiration in their design work. However, when the students began to consider what the product does rather than what it is, they were able to use bling as a source of creativity. What other design opportunities are overlooked by regarding products as being in ‘bad taste’?

  • 8.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Gunnistermannens Dräkt2010Ingår i: Bunad, ISSN 1503-9633, nr 1, s. 26-31Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    In 1951 a body of a man was found during peat digging in a peat bog at Gunnister, Shetland Islands, Great Britain. The man had been wearing a shirt, breeches, coat and a jacket made of fulled wool fabrics. His stockings, gloves, 2 caps and a small purse were knitted from wool yarn. In the purse there were two Dutch and one Swedish coin of 1683, which date the costume to around 1700. Following a partnership agreement between Shetland Amenity Trust and National Museums Scotland in 2008, detailed studies were undertaken on all of the artifacts with a view to making a full set of replicas. The project started with thorough studies and documentation at the museum in Edinburgh. Next step was the practical work: The wool was sorted, washed, carded or combed and spun. Several spinning, weaving, knitting, fulling and sewing samples were performed before the production of the clothes could start. All operations were carried out as close to the originals as possible. The success of the project is an effect of a close cooperation between participants having different competences, deep knowledge of craft, and experience from the reconstruction of historical and archaeological textiles.

  • 9.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Silk Weaving in Sweden During the 19th Century: Textiles and texts - An evaluation of the source material2012Licentiatavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Silk-weaving in Sweden during the 19th century. Textiles and texts - An evaluation of the source material. With the rich material available, 19th century silk-weaving invites to studies on industrialisation processes. The purpose of this licentiate thesis is to present and discuss an empirical material regarding silk production in Sweden in the 19th century, to examine the possibilities and problems of different kinds of materials when used as source materials, and to describe how this material can be systematized and analysed in relation to the perspective of a textile scientific interpretation. The introductory sections of the thesis provide a background to textile research and the subject of textile science. This is followed by an overview of previous research on silk-weaving in Sweden and a historical overview of silk-weaving in Sweden, the Jacquard machine, and the K.A. Almgren Sidenväveri, where large parts of the source material have been preserved. After these overviews, the research material is described and systematized: first the main materials, textiles, machines and other objects, and then the various written sources. By way of conclusion, the empirical material is summarized in a critical discussion where the various groups of materials are evaluated in comparison to one another. A discussion on theory and methodology regarding objects as sources and the use of experience-based knowledge in academic research is developed in connection to the critical discussion. Finally, the potential of the material is demonstrated through a textile example. The presentation is an introduction to the cultural-historical analysis that will follow in the PhD thesis. Here, the empirical material will be analysed through the use of knowledge in handicrafts, which may create new dimensions of silk production in Sweden and the complexity of the industrialisation process.

  • 10.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Digital utgivning av källmaterial2016Ingår i: Digital publishing and research, Helsingfors: Helsingfors universitet , 2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 11. Dahlström, Mats
    Digitizing cultural heritage material2017Ingår i: Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 2017, Göteborg: University of Gothenburg , 2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 12. Dahlström, Mats
    Digitizing projects2014Ingår i: A course handbook for ETQI: Effective training tools for application to qualification improvement in the library sector, European Commission, 2014Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 13.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Lights and shadows: digitization, digital  facsimiles and scholarly editing2017Ingår i: Digital Scholarly Editing and Modern Greek studies / [ed] Anna-Maria Sichani, Athens: National Library of Greece , 2017Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Swedish digital humanities2018Ingår i: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 14, nr 2, s. 82-94Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 15.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Utgåvor som fönster2015Ingår i: Digitale kildeutgivelser, Oslo: Nasjonalbiblioteket , 2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Dahlström, Mats
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT. University of Antwerp.
    Dillen, Wout
    Litteraturbanken: the Swedish  Literature Bank2017Ingår i: RIDE, ISSN 2363-4952, Vol. 6Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Litteraturbanken (The Swedish Literature Bank) is a freely available digital collection of Swedish literary works, ranging from medieval to contemporary literature. It is the result of a cooperation between literary and linguistic scholars, research libraries, and editorial societies and academies. The collection consists not only of digital facsimiles, but of ocr’ed, proof-checked and TEI-encoded transcriptions as well, including EPUB and HTML versions of texts, and in addition scholarly presentations and didactic introductions to works and authors in the collection. It is also being used as a publishing platform for ongoing Swedish scholarly editing projects. Litteraturbanken currently comprises more than 2.000 works, mounting up to more than 100 million of machine-readable words. Litteraturbanken‘s main weak spot is transparency; it does not openly provide satisfactory ways to ensure the editors accountability for the edited texts and images. As a whole, however, Litteraturbanken is an impressive endeavour and paves the way for fruitful cooperation and massive data exchange with e.g. computational linguistics and bibliographic databases.

  • 17.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Relational Textiles2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between technology and the expression of form have always been interconnected in the architectural design process; associating the art of envisioning spaces with the craft of materializing them. Recently in terms of surface fabrication, computational tools of representation and material fabrication opened for architectural design new possibilities to explore novel spatial expressions. Surface design processes in architecture start to borrow from the logic of representation of different non-hierarchical structures, e.g., biological systems or textile construction techniques. Relating to that, the present fascination of textiles in architectural design relies on this specific way of building surface design as non-hierarchical form, and by that, allowing the designer to play with the depth of the surface design at micro and macro levels. Exploring different relations between digital and physical through textiles expressions, this research reassess static principles of form–marking the turn from static to relational principles. Thus, the intention is to describe how the character of the textiles and computation as design material redefines the notion of space trough surface aesthetics merging the digital to the physical, and how spatiality can be questioned through textile and interaction aesthetics. Using practice-based research methodology, this research opens and explores this design space by relating theory and practice; it questions and reframes fundamental concepts of expression and scale in architecture by proposing methods for surface design, and a specific language to describe textile architectural aesthetics.

  • 18.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Relational Textiles for Space Design:design methods and expressions2011Licentiatavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Smart Textiles field opens possibilities for designers to combine traditional surface fabrication techniques with advanced technology in the design process. When it comes to the field of Smart Textiles as interactive materials for space design, it is essential to understand the identity of the material through design and also to understand the novel expressions being mediated for space. Thus, the purpose of this thesis is to develop knowledge by design on Smart Textiles as materials for architecture and to do so through design. The thesis formulates a research program to frame the design explorations. Thus, Relational Textiles for Space Design is defined as a research program in architecture where the focus lies on developing methods to design interactive textile surfaces using knitted constructions. The program is illustrated by the design projects e.g., Knitted Light, Touching Loops, Designing with Heat and Tactile Glow. As a result of the research, a new methodological framework for interactive textile design is proposed. The framework defines the notions of field and frame of reference for the design. These notions form a method to discuss design variables of relational textile expressions. Based on the design examples, the emerging expressions are described according to the field relations that the interactive textile introduces in space. Thus, expressions of spatialization e.g., reduction, amplification, addition and disassociation are introduced.

  • 19.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Relational textiles: surface expressions in space design2013Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Smart Textiles field opens possibilities for designers to combine traditional surface fabrication techniques with advanced technology in the design process. The purpose of this work is to develop knowledge on interactive knitted textiles as materials for architecture and to do so through practice-based design research. The thesis formulates a research program in order to frame the design explorations, in which scale and material expression are major placeholders. Consequently, Relational Textiles for Space Design is defined as a research program with focus on surface aesthetics and the program is illustrated by design experiments exploring the expressiveness of light, heat and movement as design materials. As a result of the research presented in this thesis, a new methodological framework for interactive textile design is proposed. The framework defines field of reference and frame of reference as basic notions in surface design. These notions form a basic frame used to revise and present the methods behind the design examples Knitted Light, Touching Loops, Designing with Heat, Tactile Glow, Repetition and Textile Forms in Movement. Relating the space of Relational Textiles for Space Design to existing surface methodology in architecture gives rise to new issues that need to be addressed. For which levels of the design process will these textiles be integrated? The last chapter reflects on the role of Relational Textiles for Space Design as possible methods or expressions in the existing space of surface prototyping.

  • 20.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Davis, Felecia
    Pattering by Heat2012Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterning by Heat: The Responsive Textile Structures presents 4 different computational textile structures that change the appearance of space through 2 different transformations that happen in the surface expression. The first typology of material is pixilated, designed with yarn that melts at high temperature; accordingly, the fabric opens or breaks when it receives current. The opening allows designers flexibility to experiment with see through effects on the fabric, or to ‘write’ upon the fabric making apertures, collecting foreground and background together in one shape. The second material has been designed with yarn that shrinks or draws solid lines in the fabric when it receives current. The shrinking reveals a more opaque patterning in the textile closing parts of that textile off, transforming the nature of that space. Both breaking and shrinking yarns have been knitted into four different architectural tension structures that are designed using computation and textiles to track people’s presence in space by the changes that appear in the surface design.

  • 21.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Persson, Anna
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Satomi, Mika
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Repetition: interactive expressions of pattern translation2012Ingår i: Proceedings The Art of Research 2012, The art of research 2012 Making, Reflecting and understading, 28-29 November 2012 at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture Helsinki, Finland, 2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As a way of opening a space where methods from the fields of fashion design, textile design and interaction design overlap, the project Repetition intersects different methodologies through practice-based research in design. Experiments were conducted to explore ways of creating relationships between body and space by means of translating information as pattern design between garments and interactive knitted walls. By arranging a startup performance, we reflected on the expressional variables that influence the expression of the pattern translations; variables concerning the garments, the walls, the print and the movements were illustrated by the expressions found. The result formulates specific descriptions regarding accuracy and distribution of pattern translation, illustrating basic concepts of pattern formations identified in visual changes appearing in the garment. By communicating our understanding of basic expressions, Repetition aims to formulate a new framework for collaborative work as a method for further design.

  • 22.
    Dumitrescu, Delia Mihaela
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Landin, Hanna
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mohr, Christian
    Högskolan i Borås, Gemensamma förvaltningen.
    Knitted Forms in Movement2014Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence in a space has own rhythm of change; it is organic,but it can be expressed structurally by the textile forms. The textile acts as a mirror between spaces that have been separated; the textile collects and spreads information through changes in structure. Motion sensors embedded in the textile are tracking the movement in one space, after a short time the textile starts to rotate the knitted modules in a slow pace repositioning its patterns.

  • 23.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Persson, Anna
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Touching Loops2009Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Touching Loops is a collection of three knitted textiles with structure-changing interactive properties. The textiles are able to sense and react to touch by shrinking, breaking or becoming stiff. The textiles are thought of as interactive architectural material. When they are touched, a specific area in the textile becomes hot. A microcontroller that is connected to the textile is programmed to sense and react to touch. The materials in the samples react to heat in different ways by shrinking, becoming stiff or by breaking into pieces. The developing process consisted in programming the patterns for industrial machines in such a way that the conductive silver yarns are of important matter for the material aesthetics besides their function to generate heat. The three knitted pieces react in different ways when current passes trough the conductive yarns. The first piece combines a silver coated copper yarn and Pemotex yarn in a ridge pattern. In the second sample a Jaquard pattern combines shrinking polyester monofilament, a Grilon yarn and a silver coated copper yarn. This piece reacts to heat by breaking and shrinking. The third piece is constructed with partial knitting and ridge patterns and the yarns used are Pemotex, a Grilon yarn and the silver coated copper yarn. When the conductive yarn gets hot, the ridges shrink and harden. The aim of the project is to explore possibilities for expressive interactive tactile knitted materials and structures. The textiles are seen as a possible material to use in the context of architecture.

  • 24.
    Frenander, Anders
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Debattens vågor: Om politisk-ideologiska frågor i efterkrigstidens svenska kulturdebatt1999Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 25.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    The all important difference… Concepts of creativity in fashion design2007Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to models and methodology in industrial design is the idea that we handle a problem in the design process; we solve a problem given in the brief. This does not make sense in fashion design. What is then the basic creative turn in fashion design all about? We suggest replacing “solving a problem” by “introducing a difference” as a central notion for explaining the creative turn in fashion design.We sketch a more precise model of this as a background for a general discussion about how we frame and explain creativity through methods and techniques of systematic artistic work.

  • 26.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    The design research text and the poetics of foundational definitions2010Ingår i: ArtMonitor, ISSN 1653-9958, nr No 8, s. 109-118Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 27.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    de Freitas, Nancy
    Editorial: Where Art, Technology and Design Meet2012Ingår i: Studies in Material Thinking, ISSN 1177-6234, Vol. Vol 7, s. 03-06Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    With a foundation in artistic practice, the Ambience´11 conference was organised as a meeting place where researchers from digital architecture, smart textiles, new media art and interaction design communities could come together to discuss and share ideas on the new expressional crossroads of art and technology and to take new ideas back to their own communities. As post modernism slowly fades away, a new interest in the expressional possibilities of constructions, techniques and materials, as well as the craftsmanship of artistic work, is becoming more and more visible in artistic practices. It is like revisiting “free” modernistic experimentation not bound by the utopian systems and dogmas targeted by post modernistic critique.

  • 28.
    Hellström, Annika
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Landin, HannaHögskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.Worbin, LindaHögskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Ambience'11 Exhibition2011Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In art and design practices, materials and technology are means of expression as well as sources of inspiration. On the other hand, in technical development processes art and design provide meaning, direction and expressions of functionality. In some sense this duality of perspectives is what defines the loci where art, design and technology meet. Over the past ten years, the Swedish School of Textiles have taken part in the ongoing discussion on how practice-based research can further develop our understanding of the expressiveness inherent in new materials and new technology. In this context it is clear that art, design and technology meet in the lab and in the workshop. However, for discussions across borders between the perspectives of art, design and technology we need meeting places outside of the labs and the workshops as well. The Ambience exhibition is an exercise in building such a meeting place, but also an exercise in providing conference space for interaction between artistic practice and theory. As designers and artists working within a research setting, we often work in parallel with writing, presenting conference papers and exhibiting in different arenas. It is then only natural to include two ways of presenting results at a conference for artistic research; to let paper presentations and exhibition interact to create wider perspectives and deeper understanding. All exhibition contributions have been subject to a peer review process similar to the review process paper submissions are subjected to. And just as for paper submissions, reviews focus on originality and skills with respect to both results and presentation. This exhibition is the first in the series of Ambience conferences. The conference is organized by the University of Borås in cooperation with Tampere University of Technology and is a part of the Smart Textiles Initiative – www.smarttextiles.se In this catalogue you will find images, artist statements and/or project descriptions presenting the works displayed at the exhibition. Welcome to the Ambience´11 exhibition!

  • 29.
    Jansen, Barbara
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Light Shell2009Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    LIGHT SHELL is an investigation into self lighting textile shells – textile spaces. A LIGHT SHELL aims to enrich its future architectural environment through lighting and being a sensual stimulation of everyday life which can be experienced through vision, touch and users being able to move inside. The exhibited prototypes visualize how a Light Shell could feel like. Integrated PMMA optical fibres allow bringing dynamic changing light into the architectural space as regenerating and relaxing stimuli for the body.

  • 30.
    Jansen, Barbara
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    rhythm exercise2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT I am a textile designer working in the area of light-emitting textiles. My research interest focuses on the exploration of new aesthetics within cloth investigating the visual effects of movement using light as a continuous, time-based medium. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles. Rhythm exercise is a part of the research for my doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. My practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. (Jansen, 2013) Context With the beginning of the era of Smart Textiles, the textile designer is challenged with a range of materials which are characterized by their ability to change expressional and functional properties. These materials respond to environmental stimuli, user interaction and pre-programmed parameters and visualize their responses to the viewer. They open up opportunities to explore new material behaviours and designing with novel and complex aesthetics (Berzina, 2011, Krogh, N.D., Layne, N.D., Taylor, 2010, Wingfield, N.D.). The availability of these new materials changes the conditions of conventional textile design; a textile pattern expression is no longer static, it once had one face, one gestalt or expression, whereas now it can show different expressions, a definite or indefinite number of times. (Jansen, 2013, page 7) Installation Rhythm exercise is an installation based on eight braided structures, displayed in three steel frames. The current exhibition displays parts of this installation. The three-dimensional braided artefacts are each based on thirteen lengths of optical fibres. They are lit by LEDs and programmed to create moving patterns of white light using a microcontroller digital interface. They have been designed to show different qualities of lighting interplay using varying rhythms and speeds. The different braids are created in identical braiding structures and with equal amount of lengths of optical fibres, thirteen per braid. The braided structures have, however, been connected to different numbers of LEDs; braid one has been connected to one light source, braids two to five have been connected to two light sources per braid and, finally, braids six to eight to thirteen light sources per braid. This allows displaying an increasing complexity of moving light patterns inside the braided structures. The installation shows a glimpse of new design possibilities and the potential for creative explorations in the field of light-emitting textiles.

  • 31.
    Jansen, Barbara
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    rhythm exercise2014Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In BUILDING WITH TEXTILES, the TextielMuseum presents work by internationally renowned architects as well as interior projects that put textiles in the spotlight. Building with textiles and flexible materials has aesthetic, functional and environmental advantages. That is why textiles are now seen as the fifth key building material alongside steel, stone, concrete and wood. In addition, the development of interior textiles with special functions – from air purification to integrated light, images and sound – offers new possibilities to design smart and interactive interiors. BUILDING WITH TEXTILES is on show from 27 September 2014 until 25 January 2015. Follow us for the complete programme: www.textielmuseum.nl Rhythm exercise is a part of Barbara Jansen`s research work for her doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. The practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles.

  • 32.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Measuring Welfare beyond GDP : 'Objective' and 'Subjective' Indicators in Sweden, 1968–20152017Ingår i: Valuation Studies, ISSN 2001-5992, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 7-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses a series of negotiations on how to measure welfare and quality of life in Sweden beyond economic indicators. It departs from a 2015 Government Official Report that advanced a strong recommendation to measure only ‘objective indicators’ of quality of life, rather than relying on what is referred to as ‘subjective indicators’ such as life satisfaction and happiness. The assertion of strictly ‘objective’ indicators falls back on a sociological perspective developed in the 1970s, which conceived of welfare as being measurable as ‘levels of living’, a framework that came to be called ‘the Scandinavian model of welfare research’. However, in the mid-2000s, objective indicators were challenged scientifically by the emerging field of happiness studies, which also found political advocates in Sweden who argued that subjective indicators should become an integral part of measuring welfare. This tension between ‘subjective’ and ‘objective’ measurements resulted in a controversy between several actors about what should count as a valuable measurement of welfare. As a consequence, we argue that the creation of such value meters is closely intertwined with how welfare is defined, and by what measures welfare should be carried through.

  • 33.
    Landahl, Karin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    On form thinking in knitwear design2013Licentiatavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis presents and discusses experimental explorations in search for new methods of form-thinking within the knitwear design process. The position of textile knitting techniques is somewhat ambiguous. This is because they are not only concerned with creating the textile material, but also with the form of the garment as these two are created in the same process. Consequently, the common perception of form and material as two separate design parameters can be questioned when it comes to knitting. Instead, we may view it as a design process that has a single design parameter; a design process in which the notion of form provides the conceptual foundation. Through conducting a series of design experiments using knitting and crochet techniques, the notion of form was explored from the perspective of the way in which we make a garment. The outcome of the experiments showed that there are possibilities for development of alternative working methods in knitwear design by viewing form in terms of topological invariants rather than as abstract geometrical silhouettes. If such a notion, i.e. a notion of a more concrete geometry, were to be implemented in the design process for knitwear, it would provide another link between action and expression that could deepen our understanding of the design potential of knitting techniques and provide the field with new expressions and gestalts.

  • 34.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Worbin, Linda
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Persson, Anna
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    The burning tablecloth2009Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Imagine that the table is set and dinner is ready. It’s time to sit down and share the moment. That is what we do also in terms of sharing a one time pattern change in the tablecloth, and in terms of sharing each others’ mobile phone activity. Incoming phone calls and messages are not notified by the phones themselves, but through a burned out pattern in the tablecloth, in between our plates. The Burning Tablecloth serves as a design example of the design technique for irreversible patterns, expressing colour and structure-changes in a knitted textile. The Burning Tablecloth changes colour and structure according to mobile phone signals (calls and text messages) with burned out patterns and acts as a medium for raising questions about interactive tactile and visual expressions in textiles. The project is a design example of research into three fields, knitted circuits, textile patterns and peoples’ relation to computational technology. The tablecloth is knitted with cotton yarns and a heating wire in a Stoll flatbed knitting machine. The pattern that appears when using the tablecloth is built up as squares with the potential of becoming chess-patterned over the whole tablecloth surface. The table-cloth is connected to a microcontroller and various electronic components. The heating wire knitted in the table-cloth is the active material; when heated it is able to change the colour and structure of the table-cloth. The burning tablecloth reacts to mobile phone signals by getting warm so that colour and eventually structure changes is appearing in the tablecloth. The experiment demonstrates a design example where visual and tactile interactive properties are expressed in a tablecloth by mobile phone signals. Combined in a material structure, textile circuits are controlled by external stimuli adding an aesthetical value to the textile expression. With a foundation of experienced knowledge from latter experiments, the tablecloth shows an example developed by the design technique for irreversible patterns. The Burning Tablecloth also demonstrates how information can be expressed in an esthetical way through textiles, acting as an interactive colour and structure changing ambient textile display.

  • 35.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Choreographed Garment2011Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptual movies focusing on the interaction between garment and choreography. The garment acts as choreographer.

  • 36.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Effect / Affect2011Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance at Ambience 2011

  • 37.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Performed Dress2011Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 38.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Landahl, Karin
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Malmgren de Oliveira, Stefanie
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Dressed Integrity2012Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Dressed–Integrity presents new logics of expression and functionality in dress and its relation to the body. As an aesthetic research program in dress it is about the fundamental relationship between form and material, between technique and expression. Through the development in art the program aims to challenge the institutions of craft through the appropriation of technology, and through the development science and epistemology the program aims to challenge the institutions of technology through the appropriation of art. The research program is therefore not an empirical research program that aims to introduce new theories about fashion. It is about developing foundational concepts and theoretical propositions of fashion design in and for itself as an academic field with an obvious integrity. As such the exhibition present a few examples of new techniques, methods, models and definitions of dress and its relation to the body, conducted by handful of PhD candidates within the research program in fashion design at the Swedish School of Textiles, Borås, Sweden.

  • 39.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Covers på Cocktail2011Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Covers på cocktail Liksom en samlingsskiva med covers på nittonhundratals hits har studenter från Textilhögskolan i Borås under ledning av Rickard Lindqvist satt samman en utställning med nytolkningar av klassiska klänningarna från Röhsskas samlingar. I slutet av augusti draperade studenter från Textilhögskolan i Borås replikor av klänningarna i Röhsskas Cocktail utställning. Dessa replikor har sedan legat till grund för ett utvecklings- och tolkningsarbete där studenterna har reproducerat klänningarna med en metodik jämförbar med att spela musikaliska covers. Att kopiera det man finner intressant ser jag som något högst nödvändigt för att en utveckling ska ske. Det kräver ett intresse, ett engagemang och en medvetenhet. Man undersöker originalet och vidareutvecklar det och samtidigt sin förmåga att se, utvärdera och skapa. En av modets grundessenser är att återskapa historien i perfekt samklang med nuet. Den perfekta kollektionen är en som upplevs som banbrytande och ny men där det samtidigt finns igenkänningsfaktorer och gemensamma referenser. Strävan efter originalitet från grunden och ignorans av historien är kanske den moderna mänsklighetens största misstag. Ska det till någon genuin progression inom modet och inte bara skapas nonsenskreationer måste dagens designers vara medvetna om historien och träna sin förmåga att se potentialen inom den.

  • 40.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mörk kostym2012Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    If the expression of the body is the focal point, and how this expression is transformed by dressing it in fabric, a more reflective study of the body from a dressmakers perspective might be meaningful for the development of new design methods. “Mörk kostym 2012” aspires to both challenge and preserve the art of tailoring. Challenge tailoring methodologically in construction, hence propose an alternative view upon the body, meanwhile preserve it by utilizing traditional methods of making. The jacket and the trousers are two examples, using the “La coupe en un seul morceau” method developed by French costumier Genevieve Sevin-Doering, here a piece of fabric is sculptured into a garment on a living body, from which a new logic is extracted proposing an alternative way of approaching the body while cutting garments. The theory is visualised in a number of gravity and balance lines on the body to initiate the work of cutting, draping and fitting garments from and certain points proposing where on the body to address the foundational cuts. These garments are cut from one single piece of fabric however the number of pieces composing the garments are of less significance. The one-piece principal can be compared to a beautiful proof in mathematics, or the simplest equation explaining a series of experiments, the proof could be written differently, in any number of pieces, but the simplicity expresses the theory more clear.

  • 41.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    On the logic of pattern cutting: foundational cuts and approximations of the body2013Licentiatavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of different principles for pattern cutting and the interest in this area has grown rapidly over the past few years, both due to the publication of a number of works dealing with the subject in different ways and the fact that a growing number of designers emphasise cutting in their practices. Although a range of principles and concepts for pattern cutting are presented from different perspectives, the main body of these systems, traditional as well as contemporary, are predominately based on a quantified approximation of the body. As a consequence, the connection of existing models for pattern construction to the dynamic expression of the body or the biomechanic function of the body is problematic. This work explores and proposes an alternative model for pattern cutting that, unlike the existing models, takes as its point of origin the actual, variable body. As such, the research conducted here is basic research, aiming to identify fundamental principles in order to create alternative expression and functions. Instead of a static matrix of a non-moving body, the proposed model for cutting garments is based on a qualitative approximation of the body, visualised through balance lines and key biomechanic points. Based on some key principles found in the works by Geneviève Sevin-Doering, the proposed model for cutting is developed through concrete experiments by cutting and draping fabrics on live models. The result of a proposed model is an alternative principle for dressmaking that challenges the fundamental relationship between dress, pattern making and the body, opening up for new expressions in dress and functional possibilities for wearing.

  • 42.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    The transformative cuts: new foundations in pattern cutting and approximations of the body2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of different principles for pattern cutting, and interest in this area has grown rapidly over the past few years, due to both the publication of a number of works dealing with the subject in different ways, and the fact that a growing number of designers emphasise experimental pattern cutting in their practices. Although a range of principles and concepts for pattern cutting are presented from different per¬spectives, the main body of these systems, traditional as well as contemporary, are predominantly based on a quantified approximation of the body. As a consequence, the connection between existing theories for pattern construction and the dynamic expression and biomechanical func¬tion of the body are problematic. This work explores and proposes an alternative theory for pattern cutting, which unlike exist¬ing models takes as its point of origin the actual, variable body. As such, the research presented here is basic research. Instead of a static matrix of a non-moving body, the proposed model for cutting garments is based on a qualitative approximation of the body, visualised through balance lines and key biomechanical points. Based on some key principles found in works by Geneviève Sevin-Doering, the proposed model for cutting is developed through concrete experiments by cut¬ting and draping fabrics on live models. The proposed theory is an alternative principle for dressmaking, which challenges the fundamental relationship between dress, pattern making, and the body, opening up for new expressions in dress and functional possibilities for wearing.

  • 43.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Malmgren de Oliveira, Stefanie
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Vanishing realities2012Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    With a belief that the core of fashion is to recreate the past in perfect congruence with the present together with a photo by Stefanie to set the mood we turned to Marcel Proust for guidance. In his novel In search of lost times Proust introduces the concept of involuntary memories. The taste of the Madeleine cookie evokes Swann’s involuntary memory of things that have vanished over times. How can we through fashion evoke involuntary memories? If the garments are vanishing into transparency will that evoke our involuntary memories of bodies and dresses. If only half a lapel is appearing will that evoke our involuntary memories of coats we used to wear? Isn’t a good piece of fashion one that reminds us of the past but at the same time gives us a feeling of being totally here now? Exploring the themes of form and memory through vanishing details and fabrics. This is carried out through the cuts in detail and silhouette and through the use of prints and ausbrenner treatment of the fabrics.

  • 44.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    University of Gothenburg.
    Happiness as a Valuation of Nations: From Margin to Indicator2016Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper traces how subjective measures of welfare were transformed from a marginal issue in the social sciences to a valuation of welfare of nations. The co-production of social science and politics is analysed in a case study of negotiations of subjective and objective indicators in Sweden.

    Since the 1970s social scientists have strived towards finding a replacement for the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as an indicator of welfare in nations. Over the years, various political actors have attempted to make such measurements comply with their ideas of what constitutes a good society. This paper traces the co-production of social scientific knowledge and the political process of attempting to establish a new standardized way of measuring welfare in Sweden.

    As GDP and other purely economic indicators have dominated how value is ascribed to nations, the various attempts of challenging this form of measurement have taken place at the margins of the social sciences. However, during the past two decades, the negotiations of finding alternative measures of welfare have dramatically moved forward their positions, entering mainstream science and politics.

    Drawing from a variety of source documents (political proposals, influential reports, mass media accounts and scientific literature), this article connects and analyses multiple modes of veridiction that are the subjects of controversies and negotiations in the construction of a proposed valuemeter of welfare in Sweden. As a result, we show how two major social scientific conceptions of welfare measurements, based either on subjective or objective indicators, relate (without being reduced) to political proposals.

  • 45.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Textile influence: exploring the role of textiles in the product design process2014Licentiatavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile materials and textile design are a part of countless products in our surroundings, as well as of diverse design fields and industries, with very different material traditions and working methods. Textile materials and industry have undergone many changes during recent decades, in terms of how and where textiles are produced, and what textiles can be and do; in much the same way, the design practices that textiles are involved in have also developed. What these diverse and evolving design contexts in which textiles are involved in have in common is that textile materials and textile design decisions somehow meet the rest of the design during a design process. The aim of this thesis is to add to our understanding of the relationship between textiles and products in the design process, and to explore the roles that textile design plays when designing textile products, the roles they can come to play when textiles become more complex and offer new means of functionality and expressiveness, for example through smart textile technology. This thesis presents two types of result: Firstly, descriptions of textile product design processes that highlight the wide range of roles that textiles can play in the textile product design processes of today, accentuate how textile materials and design decisions can influence both what can be designed and the design process, and describe some of the additional complexities that come with designing and designing with smart textiles. These examples are presented in the appended papers, and are the outcome of an observation of students who were designing textile products and collaborative, practice-based design research projects. Secondly, this thesis presents a theoretical framework which aims to offer a broad perspective on the relationship between textile design and the product design process, with the intention of opening up for reflection on how we design, and can design, with textiles. The framework focuses on how textile design decisions and textile materials participate in the process, and to what degree they influence the development of the design; this includes methods, questions, etc. that can be used to explore and define this dynamic. One of the main points of the framework is the importance of the textile influence in textile product design processes; the specific qualities of textiles as a design material - the considerations, possibilities, and challenges, which influence both the design of the product and the process of designing it. This includes not only the textiles in the final design, but also the textiles that, in other ways, feature in this process.

  • 46.
    Pennlert, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet .
    Erixon, Per OlofUmeå Universitet .
    Digital Humaniora: Humaniora i en digital tid2017Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 47.
    Pennlert, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet .
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå Universitet .
    En (digital) humaniora?: Potential, dilemman och kritik2017Ingår i: Digital Humaniora: humaniora i en digital tid / [ed] Per Olof Erixon & Julia Pennlert, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2017, s. 11-26Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 48.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Carlsson, Jan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Bratt, Magnus
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Smart textiles for knitted products: Prototype factory2009Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a concept of collaboration between industry, university and research institutes in the area of Smart Textiles in Sweden. The concept idea of a laboratory and Prototype Factory at The Swedish School of Textiles for development of Smart Textiles in knitting is presented. The result presented shows a concept where Smart Textiles can be developed and knitted in a prototype factory and a development laboratory. Companies, researchers and others with product ideas in the area of Smart Textiles can here get a first prototype and help to continue to make a ready made product for the market.

  • 49.
    Player Koro, Catarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen för Pedagogik.
    Beach, Dennis
    'Roll-out neoliberalism' through one-to-one laptop investments in Swedish schools2014Ingår i: Networked Together: Designing Participatory Research in Online Ethnography. Proceedings of the 3rd annual conference on Rethinking educational ethnography: researching on-line communities and interactions, Naples June 6-7, 2013 / [ed] Paulo Landrini, Andrea Maccarini, Rosanna DeRosa, CNR-IRPPS e-Publishing , 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper calls for the need to better understand how the marketization of public sector in Sweden has changed the way policies are produced and translated in to action. Its aim is to contribute to and enable a debate about consequences of privatisation. It does so taking IT-education policy as a case and takes a point of departure in the most recent efforts made by government and educational leaders to push ICT into educational settings, in the so called one-to-one laptop initiatives. The aim of the paper is to discuss how the use of a methodological design that is a synergistic research design between social network analysis and ethnography, called network ethnography can be used to investigate how educational policy is being ‘done’ in new digital locations which involve new forms of social structuring that emphasize flows and mobility of people, capital and ideas.

  • 50.
    Player-Koro, Catarina
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen för Pedagogik.
    How do different modalities of pedagogical practices within teacher education shape student teachers? An empirical study of secondary mathematics teacher education2009Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how ethnography is used to explore the pedagogical practice in teacher education, how it is structured, transmitted and acquired. It has two foci, which gives the paper a dual purpose: to identify and describe (even theoretically) a key substantive issue and to reflect on the use of ethnography in this. The empirical material is drawn from an ethnographic study where a group of students were followed 20 weeks during a mathematic course. The material discussed here, represents 20 hours of participants observations from lectures in mathematics, and 8 conversional interviews with students. The paper uses Bernstein’s concepts of code and the modalities of pedagogic transmission and acquisition, and his typology of vertical and horizontal discourse, to show how a strong classified and framed practice block student teachers from developing vertical knowledge structure in mathematics. The mathematic knowledge that students are subjected to takes more the form of a horizontal discourse and that is problematic for their professional development in that a horizontal discourses reduce student access to important forms of knowledge by which they can challenge tradition and consciously change their practice (Bernstein, 2000, 2003).

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