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  • 1.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Time-based matter: suggesting new variables for space design2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently, digitalisation has moved beyond a desktop paradigm to one of ubiquitous computing; by introducing new possibilities and dynamic materials to various design fields, e.g. product design and architecture, it allows future spaces to be envisioned. Prior to being incorporated in the housing of the future, however, the hybrid character of computational materials raises questions with regard to the development of the appropriate design methods to allow them to be used in the production of space. Thus, merging physical and digital attributes in the material design process and expression not only enables a better understanding of materials through design, but also requires a cross-disciplinary methodology to be articulated in order to allow different perspectives on e.g. material, interaction, and architecture to interweave in the design process. Based on a practice-based research methodology, this paper proposes a cross-disciplinary framework where the notion of temporal scalability – enabled by the character of computation as a design material – is discussed in relation to form and material in architecture. The framework is illustrated by two different design examples, Repetition and Tactile Glow, and the methods behind their creation – merging time, material, and surface aesthetics – are discussed.

  • 2.
    Femenías, Paula
    et al.
    Department of Architecture, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fridh, Kristina
    Academy of Design and Crafts (HDK), University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zetterblom, Margareta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Keune, Svenja
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Henrysson, Erica
    Department of Architecture, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mörk, Klara
    The Swedish School of Textiles (THS), University of Borås, Sweden.
    Earthy textiles. Experiences from a joint Teaching Encounter between Textile Design and Architecture2017In: Cumulus REDO Conference Proceedings Design School Kolding 30 May – 2 June 2017 / [ed] Anne Louise Bang,Mette Mikkelsen, Anette Flinck, 2017, p. 236-251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents experiences from a two-day teaching workshop where first year students in architecture meet with first year students in textile design for an assignment on building structures with textile, soil and plants designing for indoor gardening with the aim of inspiring for more sustainable lifestyles. The background is a research project on textile architecture with the objective of exploring this new field and to establish a platform for long-term collaboration between the disciplines of architecture and textile design. The paper addresses pedagogical challenges in the meeting between first-years students of different disciplines and traditions, but also in the meeting between research and undergraduate teaching. The students produced creative results but had difficulties in exploring the full complexity of the task. An evaluative discussion is based on observations, photo documentation, notes during group discussions, follow-up questionnaires among the students and reflections among involved researchers.

  • 3.
    Kapur, Jyoti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Smells: olfactive dimension in designing textile architecture2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing with non-visual attributes challenges ways of representation. This research explores methods for designing with invisible materiality within the research practice, as well as ways of representation through textiles when designing spaces. Exploring textiles and smells within a space, the research program investigates spatial interactions.

    This research focuses on designing embodied experiences using tangible materials as expressions of smells. Through the spatial installations and performances Sight of smell, Touch of smell, and Smell, space, and body movement, haptics were explored as one of the methods of interaction with smells through textiles.

    Through the sense of touch, this research also investigates ways of revealing, activating, and disseminating smells within a space. Smells were purposely added through the methods of dyeing, coating, and printing to the textile materials that did not inherently embody any smells, As a result, tactile surfaces create non-visual expressions of smell. Further ideas of research in this area would explore another perspective of designing with smells in spaces. As an example, by designing textiles being smell absorbers, dividers, and re ectors, could compliment the spatial concepts and deals with the already existing smells in a living environment.

    In this licentiate thesis thinking through the olfactive dimension to design textiles is not only novel for the textile design eld; but also, its proposal for application in the spatial design is quite unique, and o ers a new dimension for spatial design. 

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