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  • 1.
    Erikson, Martin G.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Erlandson, Peter
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Theories as maps: Teaching psychology beyond mind and behavior2015In: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology, ISSN 2332-2101, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a challenge for psychology education to teach students about the possibilities and limitations of psychological theories. In the present article, we attempt to meet this challenge by employing the metaphorical expression “theories-are-maps” as a didactic tool for exploring the dynamics between psychology as a scientific project and the nature of the phenomena observed. Using mental illness as an example, we use the map metaphor to discuss the various difficulties involved in teaching theories in psychology, in such terms as the risk of confusing maps and terrain. While using theories-are-maps as a tool does add complexity to psychology education, it also helps illustrate how the relationship between theory and the “reality” that theoretical devices are describing can be envisaged. We see this as a contribution to the discussion on critical thinking in psychology, particularly in the teaching of psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)

  • 2.
    Gacia, Danilo
    et al.
    Blekinge Center of Competence, Karlskrona.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Archer, Trevor
    Rosenberg, Patricia
    Network for Empowerment and Well-Being.
    The Dark Side of the Affective  Profiles: Differences and Similarities  in Psychopathy, Machiavellianism,  and Narcissism2015In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, ISSN 2158-2440, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affective profiles model is based on the combination of individuals’ experience of high/low positive affect and high/low negative affect: self-fulfilling, high affective, low affective, and self-destructive. We used the profiles as the backdrop for the investigation of individual differences in malevolent character traits (i.e., the Dark Triad: psychopathy, Machiavellianism, and narcissism). A total of 1,000 participants (age: M = 31.50 SD = 10.27, 667 males and 333 females), recruited through Amazons’ Mechanical Turk (MTurk), responded to the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule and the Dark Triad Dirty Dozen. Individuals with a high affective profile reported higher degree of narcissism than those with any other profile, and together with individuals with a self-destructive profile, also higher degree of Machiavellianism and psychopathy than individuals with a low affective and self-fulfilling profile. Males scored higher in Machiavellianism and psychopathy. Together with earlier findings, our results show that while individuals in both the self-fulfilling and high affective profiles are extrovert and self-directed, only those in the high affective profile express an immature and malevolent character (i.e., high levels of all Dark Triad traits). Conversely, individuals in the self-fulfilling profile have earlier reported higher levels of cooperativeness and faith. More importantly, the unique association between high levels of positive emotions and narcissism and the unified association between negative emotions to both psychopathy and Machiavellianism imply a dyad rather than a triad of malevolent character traits.

  • 3. Jimmefors, Alexander
    et al.
    Garcia, Danilo
    Rosenberg, Patricia
    Fariba, Mousavi
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Archer, Trevor
    Locomotion (Empowering) and Assessment (Disempowering) Self-regulatory Dimensions as a Function of Affective Profile in High School Students.2014In: International Journal of School and Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to examine high school adolescent pupils’ self-regulatory strategies in relation to psychological well-being and subjective well-being (i.e., temporal life satisfaction and affect) using the affective profiles model as the backdrop for the analysis. Participants were categorized into Self-fulfilling (high positive, low negative), High affective (high positive, high negative), Low affective (low positive, low negative) and Self-destructive (low positive, high negative) profiles according to their responses on the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. The participants also self-reported self-regulation (“assessment” and “locomotion”),temporal life satisfaction (past, present and future) and psychological well-being (e.g. Self-acceptance,environmental mastery, personal growth). Self-fulfilling adolescents, in contrast to Self-destructive adolescents, expressed high levels of temporal life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The self-regulatory “locomotion” dimension was associated to high positive affect profiles, higher life satisfaction and psychological well-being whereas the self-regulatory “assessment” dimension was associated with high negative affect profiles, lesser life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Taken together, the well-being outcomes linked to the “locomotion” dimension seem to contribute to an upward ‘spiral of empowerment’, reinforcing approaching or agentic behavior; while the outcome linked to the “assessment” dimension appear to consist of a downward ‘spiral of disempowerment’ or inaction.

  • 4.
    Kendrick, Kristin
    et al.
    School of Social Work, University of British Columbia.
    Jutengren, Göran
    Center for Developmental Research, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Center for Developmental Research, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University.
    The protective role of supportive friends against bullying perpetration and victimization2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1069-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crossed-lagged regression model was tested to investigate relationships between friendship support, bullying involvement, and its consequences during adolescence. Students, 12–16 years ( N = 880), were administered questionnaires twice, one year apart. Using structural equation modeling, a model was specified and higher levels of support from friends were related to lower levels of bullying and victimization one year later. Additionally, a bidirectional relationship between victimization and depression was found, and greater property crimes commission was related to higher levels of future bullying. These findings support the ‘friendship protection hypothesis’ and suggest the quality of support in friendships can protect against bullying victimization and perpetration. Prior research has shown that friendships can protect against victimization; however this is one of the few longitudinal studies to focus on the quality of friendship, rather than other characteristics of the friends. It is suggested that interventions should focus on increasing perceptions of support within existing friendships.

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