Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A Learning Model for Nursing Students during Clinical Studies2011In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 384-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research project where the aim was to develop a new model for learning support in nursing education that makes it possible for the student to encounter both the theoretical caring science structure and the patient’s lived experiences in his/her learning process. A reflective group supervision model was developed and tested. The supervision was lead by a teacher and a nurse and started in patient narratives that the students brought to the supervision sessions. The narratives were analyzed by using caring science concepts with the purpose of creating a unity of theory and lived experiences. Data has been collected and analyzed phenomenologically in order to develop knowledge of the students’ reflection and learning when using the supervision model. The result shows that the students have had good use of the theoretical concepts in creating a deeper understanding for the patient. They have learned to reflect more systematically and the learning situation has become more realistic to them as it is now carried out in a patient near context. In order to reach these results, however, demands the necessity of recognizing the students’ lifeworld in the supervision process.

  • 2.
    Elm, Marie
    University of Borås, School of Health Science. Högskolan i Borås,University College of Borås. ÄldreVäst Sjuhärad.
    LÄR-UT: bättre läkemedelshantering för äldre2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Målet med projektet LÄR-UT är att ta fram en modell för bättre läkemedelshantering för äldre samt att utbilda sjuksköterskor inom kommunal hälso- och sjukvård till handledare.

  • 3. Elmqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Trapped between doing and being: First provider´s experiences of ”front line” work2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common focus in research studies within the Emergency Department (ED) is physician patient relations, experiences of the triage model and nurses´ experiences of caring. Little has, however, been written about different first providers´ experiences of working on the “front line” at the ED. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first provider on the “front line” at the ED, as expressed by nurse assistants, registered nurses and physicians. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used in four different caring situations. The data consisted of eight open-ended interviews with first providers. The analysis showed that being the first provider on the “front line” at the ED entails a continuous movement between providing and responding through performing “life-saving” actions and at the same time create a good relationship with the patient and the next of kin. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon. The readiness to save lives creates a perceived stress of time pressure and the first providers adopt different strategies to cope with the work. Instead of leaving the first providers to find their own way to cope with the complex situation, there are needs for a redesigning of the internal work process within ED organizations.

  • 4.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Karlsson, K
    Niemelä, P
    Heart rate as a marker of stress in ambulancepersonnel: a pilot study of body's response to the ambulance alarm2011In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Studies have demonstrated the presence of stress and post-traumatic stress among ambulance personnel, but no previous research has focused on the body’s reaction in the form of the change in heart rate of ambulance staff in association with specific occupational stress. Hypothesis: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether work as an ambulance professional generates prolonged physiological arousal that can be measured by heart rate in different situations. Methods: Twenty participants carried a pulse-meter in the form of a wristwatch, which continuously measured and stored their heart rate 24 hours per day for a period of seven days. All ambulance alarms that occurred during the test period were recorded in journals, and the participants completed diaries and a questionnaire describing their experiences. The alarms were divided into different phases. Correlations between heart rate in the different phases were computed. Results: Analysis of study data indicated a significant rise of heart rate unrelated to physical effort during an emergency alarm and response. This increased heart rate was noticed throughout the mission and it was not related to the length of experience the staff had in the ambulance profession. In addition, a non-significant trend suggested that alarms involving acutely ill children lead to an even higher increase in heart rate. In addition, this research showed that constant tension existed during sleep, while available for an emergency, indicated by a noticeable increase in heart rate during sleep at work compared to sleeping at home. Conclusions: A rise in heart rate was experienced during all acute emergency missions, regardless of a subject’s experience, education, and gender. Missions by themselves generated a rate increase that did not seem to correlate with physical effort required during an emergency response. This study shows that working on an ambulance that responds to medical emergencies is associated with a prolonged physiological arousal.

  • 5.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A Bridge Between a Lonely Soul and the Surrounding World: A study on Existential Consequences of being Closely Related to a person with Aphasia.2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illuminates existential consequences of being closely related to a person suffering from aphasia. Seventeen close relatives were interviewed and their narratives were interpreted with inspiration from Ricoeur, Levinas, Husserl, Winnicot, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. The emerging interpretations resulted in four themes that illuminate a life characterized by lost freedom, staying, a new form of relationship, and growing strong together with others. An overarching theme suggests that a life together with an aphasic person means being used as a bridge between the aphasic person and the surrounding world. Moreover, it illuminates that a close relative to a person with aphasia is a person who does not leave, despite a heavy burden of lonely responsibility. It is concluded that community services need to fulfill their responsibility of providing support to informal caregivers as suggested by the Swedish lawmakers.

  • 6.
    Nyström, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Josefsson, Karin
    Leksell, Janeth
    Willman, Aina
    Debatt: Bered plats för omvårdnadsforskning?2011In: Dagens medicin, ISSN 1104-7488, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 18-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margareta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin: A phenomenological hermeneutical study2012In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rooms in Intensive Care Units are considered as high-tech environments and believed to affect recovery process and wellbeing of patients. Moreover, the design and interiors affect the interplay between the patient and the next of kin. Objective The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the meanings of the intensive care patient room as experienced by next of kin. Design Next of kin (n = 14) from two different intensive care units participated. Data were collected through photo-voice and analysed using aphenomenological hermeneutical method. Results Three major themes emerged; dwelling in the room and time, becoming at home and extension of the room. The results show that the room is perceived as a lived and extended place and space. The design, interiors and furnishing in the patient room are fundamental in shaping the next of kin's experiences in the room and affect wellbeing. Conclusions How intensive care patient rooms are designed, the place given to next of kin and the way they are received in the room are decisive for the support given to the loved one. Simple interventions can make the patient room a more healing environment.

  • 8. Vicente, Veronica
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Castren, Maaret
    Sjöstrand, Fredrik
    Svensson, Leif
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Differentiating frailty in older people using the Swedish ambulance service: A retrospective audit2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 228-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elderly population in Sweden is increasing. This will lead to an increased need for healthcare resources and put extra demands on healthcare professionals. Consequently, ambulance personnel will be faced with the challenge of meeting extra demands from increasing numbers of older people with complex and atypical clinical presentations. Therefore we highlight that great problems exist for ambulance personnel to understand and meet these patients’ care needs. Using a caring science approach, we apply the patient’s perspective, and the aim of this study is to identify and illuminate the conditions that affect elderly people assessed with the assessment category “general affected health condition”. Thus, we have analyzed the characteristics belonging to this specific condition. The method is a retrospective audit, involving a qualitative content analysis of a total of 88 emergency service records. The conclusion is that by using caring science, the concept of frailty which is based on a comprehensive understanding of human life can clarify the state of “general affected health condition”, as either illness or ill-health. This offers a new assessment category and outlines care and treatment that strengthen and support the health and wellbeing of the individual elderly person. Furthermore, the concept of frailty ought to be included in “The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems” (ICD-10).

  • 9.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Being Prepared for the Unprepared: A Phenomenology Field Study of Swedish Prehospital Care2012In: Journal of Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0099-1767, E-ISSN 1527-2966, ISSN 0099-1767, Vol. 38, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This paper presents a study of prehospital care with particular focus on how ambulance personnel prepare themselves for their everyday assignments. Methods: The caring science field study took a phenomenological approach, where data were analyzed for meaning. Two specialist ambulance nurses, three registered nurses, and six paramedics participated. Results: The previously known discrepancy between in-hospital care and prehospital care was further interpreted in this study. The pre-information from an emergency medical dispatch (EMD) center provides ambulance personnel with basic expectations as to what they will have to take care of. At the same time that they maintain their certainty and control, our major findings indicate that prehospital care in emergency medical service requires the personnel to be prepared for an open and flexible encounter with the patient; to be prepared for the unprepared, i.e., to be open and to avoid being governed by predetermined statements. Discussion: Our findings suggest that the outcomes of good prehospital care affect patient security. The seemingly time-consuming dialogue with the patient facilitates understanding and decision-making regarding the patient's medical needs, and it is comforting to the patient. The ambulance personnel need to be well prepared for this task and fully understand that the situation might differ considerably from the information provided by the EMD centers. All objective information is of great value in this care context, but ultimately it is the patient who provides reliable information about her/his own situation.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf