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  • 1.
    Andersson, R.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ottosson, T.
    University of Borås, Professional Services. University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Larsson, J.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    A Case Study: A quality approach to managing supply chain risks.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kombination av ledningsfilosofier bäst.2007In: Intelligent logistik, ISSN 1653-9451, Vol. 2, p. 23-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kvalitet ger cost cutting. Ericssons erfarenheter2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hammerberg, P
    A six sigma framework enabling collaboration across company boundaries in supply chain.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5. Andersson, Viktor
    et al.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Comparative study of organic thin film tandem solar cells in alternative geometries2008In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 104, no 12, p. 6-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Optical modelling of one folded tandem solar cell and four types of stacked tandem solar cells has been performed, using the finite element method and the transfer matrix method for the folded cell and the stacked cells, respectively. The results are analysed by comparing upper limits for short circuit currents and power conversion efficiencies. In the case of serial connected tandems all of the five cell types may be compared, and we find that the folded cells are comparable to stacked tandem cells in terms of currents and power conversion efficiencies.

  • 6.
    Axelson, Sara
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Textilt avfall och textil återvinning  i Borås Stad2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The consumption of textiles is increasing more and more, meanwhile there are vigorous efforts both from the textile industry and controlling companies to promote sustainable consumption. A significant amount of textiles discarded in household waste, which is an untapped resource that should be taken advantage of. Two methods to use textile waste is to reuse and recycling it. The reuses of textile materials are today well developed in Sweden, however, there are currently no existing system for recycling textiles.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate Borås Stad’s textile waste and the textile recycling. The reason I chose Borås is because the city has an old history in the Swedish textile industry and today strives to be in top of the textile innovations. The methods being used in this study are a literature studies and a interview.

    Borås Stad actively works to encourage the citizens to reuse and recycle their textile waste. The opportunity to recycle textiles is today only in the special collecting boxes. Borås Stad has nowadays, because of size- and economical aspects, not an own developed recycle system for textile waste.

  • 7.
    Boström, Martin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Marting, Oliver
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Säkerställning av saldokvalitet2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis took place at Silvent AB’s headquarters in Borås. The purpose of this inquiry was to identify in which ways the company could improve their stock-on-hand accuracy. The importance of having a correct inventory balance is growing for every year that passes. Concepts like Lean, forecasting, re-ordering point, and stock replenishment are all based on having a correct stock balance. In order to investigate the reasons for an incorrect inventory balance, interviews were conducted with staff that is central to achieving a correct stock balance. In addition to the interviews, the flow of the demarcated product group was observed. Since there are several factors that affect inventory balance, the analysis explores several methods that are possible to use to achieve a more secure inventory balance.The three main conclusions of the inquiry are as follows: Procedures for measurment and documentation.Documentation of measurements is important as a basis to visualize problem areas and motives for possible improvements. Therefore, it is not only important to introduce clear procedures for how measurements are to be performed but also how the documentation of these measurements should be done, making it possible to backtrack and compare with previous measurements. RFIDWith the implementation of some form of digital markup and an automated identification system, there is great potential for improving the quality of the stock balance. Evidence that RFID could reduce the inaccuracy of inventory balance by about 26% is found in a previous study by Hardgrave et. al. 2015. The company is therefore recommended to investigate if there are possibilities for implementing this. KanbanAn easy way to handle items that are difficult or costly to keep an inventory balance is a two-bin system where replenishment of the stock is done in a more visual way. However, by not keeping a proper record of stock balance of the articles makes it difficult to report figures on how many items that is available if it is required.

  • 8.
    Breaum Löfvenborg, Frida
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ekonomiska incitament till gröna investeringar inom rederisektorn2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental impact from transport of goods is a growing problem in today’s society. Environmental laws are implemented to minimize this impact and to force change in the industry but it has become clear that these laws are not enough to reach environmental goals set by different governments. Fiscal incentives are therefore implemented to, through economical forces, motivate companies to make green investments that minimize their environmental impact. This paper has studied environmental policies in the road transport sector, railway sector and the shipping sector to examine what kinds of fiscal incentives are being used in the transport sector. A survey study in the shipping sector was conducted where shipping companies was asked to grade the identified fiscal incentives in importance and influence on decisions concerning green investments. This was done with the purpose to identify which fiscal incentives in the shipping sector that can promote green investments. The survey examined 6 different types of fiscal incentives in the shipping sector: environmental certification, environmental laws, public investments in green infrastructure, governmental subsidies, environmental discounts and environmental indices. The study shows that all the examined fiscal incentives can promote green investments but to different degree. The study also shows that the shipping companies had a more positive attitude towards incentives with a direct financial impact and a less positive attitude to those with an indirect financial impact. The shipping companies graded environmental laws and environmental discounts as being the most important and having the greatest influence on decisions concerning green investments and environmental indices as being the least important and having the least influence.

  • 9.
    Börjesson, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Computational Studies of Metal Clusters and Carbon Nanotubes2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon nanotubes constitute a promising candidate material in the realisation of nanoscaled electronics. This requires the ability for systematic production of carbon nanotubes with certain properties. This is called selective carbon nanotube growth. Two important aspects related to carbon nanotube growth are investigated in order to shed some light on this issue. First the melting behaviour of nanometer sized iron particles is investigated using molec- ular dynamics simulations. The iron nanoparticles studied are mounted on a porous Al2 O3 substrate in order to mimic the experimental situation during nanotube growth with the chemical vapour deposition method. This showed that the melting temperature of a cluster on a porous substrate may be lower than the melting temperature of a cluster on a flat sub- strate. This means that the catalyst particles used for nanotube growth may be liquid. In association with these studies the role of surface curvature to melting behaviour is explored further. The second presented study concerns the docking of nickel clusters to open single wall carbon nanotube ends. The motivation for this study was the possibility to continue growth of a carbon nanotube by docking of catalyst particles to its end. This work may also be of importance for the creation of electric junctions between carbon nanotubes and metal elec- trodes. This study showed that independent of whether the metal was gently put on the nanotube end or brutally forced to the end, it is the metal that adapts to the nanotube and not vice versa. For forced docking it was seen that carbon might dissolve in to the metal. This was not seen for the gently docked clusters. Carbon dissolution might affect the electronic properties of the metal (carbide) and nanotube-metal junction.

  • 10.
    Börjesson, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    In silico studies of carbon nano tubes and metal clusters2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon nanotubes have been envisioned to become a very important material in various applications. This is due to the unique properties of carbon nanotubes which can be exploited in applications on length scales spanning from the nano world to our macroscopic world. For example, the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes makes them utterly suitable for nano electronics while the strength of them makes them suitable for reinforcements in plastics. Both of these applications do however require... mer the ability for systematic production of carbon nanotubes with certain properties. This is called selective carbon nanotube growth and today this has not been achieved with total success. In the work presented in the thesis several different computational methods have been applied in our contribution to the systematic search for selective carbon nanotube growth. Put in a context of previous knowledge about carbon nanotube growth our results provide valuable clues to which parameters that control the carbon nanotube growth. In association with the latest results we even dare to, with all modesty, speculate about a plausible control mechanism. The studies presented in the thesis addressed different stages of carbon nanotube growth, spanning from the properties affecting the initiation of the growth to the parameters affecting the termination of the growth. In some more detail this included studies of the melting temperatures of nanoscaled metal clusters. The expected size dependence of the melting temperatures was confirmed and the melting temperatures of clusters on substrates were seen to depend both on the material and shape of the surface. As this constitute the premises prior to the carbon nanotube growth it was followed by studies of the interaction between carbon nanotubes and metal clusters of different size and constitution. This was done using different computational methods and at different temperatures. It soon became apparent that the clusters adapted to the carbon nanotube and not vice versa. This held true irrespectively of the constitution of the cluster, that is for both pure metal and metal carbide. It was also seen that there exist a minimum cluster size that prevent the carbon nanotube end from closing. Closure of the carbon nanotube end is likely to lead to the termination of the growth which lead to studies of other reasons for growth termination, e.g., Ostwald ripening of the catalyst particles. This was investigated with the result that the rate of the Ostwald ripening may depend on both the chirality and diameter of the carbon nanotubes. It is suggested that this may provide some answers to the controlled growth of carbon nanotubes.

  • 11.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dual-textures: textiles in between function and ornamentation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating computational technology to architectural surfaces challenges the traditional design process offering novel possibilities to design materials and spaces. Starting with a conceptual design exercise, the present paper discusses the relation between form, textile expression and human interaction in architectural design by joining together different design practices such as architecture, textile and interaction design. The aim of the paper is to challenge design views and to integrate textiles and computerized technology as part of the expression in space design that means to relate the aesthetic of the space to the user’s actions. It is a reflection on the role of interactive textiles textures that exceed the expressional and technological limits of the traditional textile materials having dual nature between function and ornamentation in architectural design. The present paper is an example of practice based research and follows a design project that had as objective to design a collection of interactive textile structures meant to be used in an architectural context. The aim of the project was to explore the soft face of computerized technology and to integrate it into the space design to generate new typologies that relate the space to the human presence; to explore situations how people’s relation to the space materializes and progresses in time by the mean of interactive soft surfaces.

  • 12.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Interactive Textile Expressions in Spatial Design: Architecture as Synesthetic Expression2010In: Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal, ISSN 1833-1874, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extending the role of the surface from just an embellishment of the tectonics to communicative devices challenges the traditional design process in architecture. Through a series of design examples, the paper presents a research program that introduces and discusses a new grammar of ornamentation generated by the relation between surface expression and the act of use in the build space. Projects such as Knitted light, Touching loops, Designing with heat and Tactile glow are examples meant to analyze the relation between material, space, time and interaction expression through the design of three dimensional knitted interactive textile structures. The design process joins together different design fields such as architectural, textile and interaction design in order to re-define the relation between human being and space. The design process starts with the microstructure of the textile element and ends with the space design using the interaction design as a tool to relate the human presence to space. The paper aims to propose new interactive spatial expressions created by the integration of computational technology into soft interactive textile surfaces that enable the user to perceive the complexity of the architectural space through a synesthetic perception, that exceeds the limits of visuality.

  • 13.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    International Seminar at Kolding Design School- Textiles, light, ornament and interior space2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitted Light ‐ Space and Emotion ‐ design of textile expressions that integrate light as functional and aesthetic asset in order to enlarge our space experience. Starting from the relation between light, textiles and space the present project proposes a vision of textiles as an interface between interior and exterior as part of building facades. The purpose of the project is to reintroduce textiles as an alternative to the functional and aesthetic layer of glass by being applied to the interior part of the façade. This is to create a textile interface that interacts with light between the indoor and outdoor environment; to offer architects an advanced textile complement to the conventional materials in building design. The design process follows two general paths one oriented towards function having as aim to enhance the functional potential of the material such as energy saver and the other towards expression by using the emotional potential of the combination of textiles and light to raise the user’s interaction with the built environment. Each of the resulting prototypes develops an individual idea based on the effect created by light and its surface in order to create an interactive environment. Alongside with the aesthetical values given by the exploration of the relation between textiles and light, the project has a strong technical approach by exploring different possibilities to integrate artificial light into the textile structures and to create three‐dimensional surfaces using knitting as a technique.

  • 14.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Grunderna i Supply Chain Management: riskhantering2008In: Intelligent logistik, ISSN 1653-9451, no 9, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Grunderna i Supply Chain Risk Management2007In: Intelligent logistik, ISSN 1653-9451, no 4, p. 34-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Transportbranscherna hukar om stölder2007In: Transportarbetaren, ISSN 0492-004X, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lumsden, K.
    Differences in stakeholder opinion regarding antagonistic gateway within the transport network2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ellwanger, Marion
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    EduWear2008Other (Other academic)
  • 19. Ellwanger, Marion
    Smart textiles- Paradigmenwechsel im textil design2008Other (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Customized value chains2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Demand chain management -den felande länken.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Demand Chain Management: from Vision to Action2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Demand Chain Management: visioner och verklighet. Från kostnadsminimeringtill värdeökning. Vad innebär begreppet "profitable inefficiences"?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Fast Fashion: the new archetype for modelling advanced logistics systems2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Från supply till demand chain management2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Historisk överblick, Schenkers logistikpris 25 år.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sessionsmoderator, Fokus på Demand Chain: Tillbaka till framtiden2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ericsson, D.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Christopher, M.
    From Supply to Demand Chain Management2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kvalitetsdriven logistik och Demand Chain Management2009In: Vetenskap för profession, ISSN 1654-6520, no 10, p. 39-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Marknadsförarna måste kopplas ihop med logistikerna.2007In: Intelligent logistik, ISSN 1653-9451, no 6, p. 23-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Eriksson, Gustav
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Johansson, Filip
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Planelind, Ted
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    How can Smart Industry concepts improve existing material handling processes within automotive industry: An exploratory study at VOLVO Cars Corporation2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to understand the next generation of manufacturing in relation to material handling. The research did this by setting the question of how Smart Industry could improve existing material handling processes. Smart Industry is the term to describes what is expected to be the next generation of manufacturing. The thesis was conducted as an exploratory study which meant that it began with comprehensive literature review which was followed of an analysis of three processes within material handling at an automotive company. The observations and analysis were based on Lean philosophy.  Identified issues and challenges were then set in the context of Smart Industry to find solutions. As a result of the analysis excessive material handling and wasteful buffers was found. An example of this was physical transports of material only so the system could register its arrival. These issues were identified to affect the lead time in a negative way. Smart Industry was found to have solutions for general material handling issues such gaining higher visibility with sensors and Big Data. The major finding of this paper was the Smart Industry solutions for the identified issues within the examined processes. One of these solutions is autonomous vehicle which can reduce the transport time with 66%. The conclusion of the study was that the solutions within Smart Industry can not only be used to improve the examined processes but can be generalized over material handling. Furthermore, a growing digitalization will require that companies engage in the development of Smart Industry technology.

  • 32. Fernaesus, Ylva
    et al.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    John Tharakan, Mili
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lundström, Anders
    Touch and Feel Soft Hardware2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With soft hardware we refer to electronic components, coatings, and shells built from materials that make them elastic, flexible, floppy and malleable. By introducing new material properties into electronic and computational contexts we expect to open new paths for designing interactive things. Building electronics with textile and other soft materials may easily degrade elements such as speed, power, and storage capacities; however, these constraints can be acceptable if not down right desirable in these new contexts. We see how sensors, actuators, computers and even battery cells made of soft materials enables us to embed them into soft shapes that in turn afford certain forms of interaction. With the term soft hardware, we also highlight the interplay between computational and physical materials in interaction designs.

  • 33.
    Frennås, Emma
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Olofsson Carlbom, Markus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Implementering av Näranalys: En arbetsmetod för att finna grundorsaker till avvikelser i produktion.2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to pay attention to quality deviations in the production of an international company that export customized transport logistics and inventory management. With the help of a working method, called Näranalys, should approaches to manage a quality deviation be improved. The reason to the implementation is to figure out the root causes of deviations and to process them in order to reduce the risk of recurrence. Faults and defects arising in all activities can be defined as the quality deficiency cost and may, according to Sörqvist, consist of up to 30% of a total turnover and is therefore essential to minimize (2001).Based on the organization philosophy Lean Management, a number of aspects have been identified as essential for the implementation of a working method to succeed. Reflecting on how the philosophy of standardization can contribute to psychosocial stresses is an important part of the studie. A crucial factor in the outcome of the study is the awareness of the working method. It is therefore important to clarify that the working method was not created for monitoring individuals, but to improve the way in which work is done and to create the conditions for operators to have the right circumstances to make a good job from the start.

  • 34.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knitted strain sensor for respiration measurement: The Improvement of Sensor Characteristics by Intarsia Knitting2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Test and Evaluation of Textile based Stretch Sensors2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This project has focused on test and evaluation of three different textile sensors. The project includes the development of sensors, the exploration of suitable measurement methods and devices and finally the evaluation of the sensors according to three different applications. Four results were given in order to characterize sensor performance and to verify the effective working ranges. Further the sensors were integrated in three applications such as force sensor, breath sensor and movement sensor in order to test the sensor functionality by application. Future research orientation has suggested by the end of the paper.

  • 36. Hilletofth, P.
    et al.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hilmola, O.P.
    Ujvari, S.
    Differentiated Supply Chains Strategies Based on Customer Insights2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM 2008) Skövde 30/6-2/7 2008, 2008, p. 540-547Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37. Hilletofth, P.
    et al.
    Ericsson, D.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hilmola, O.P.
    Ujvari, S.
    Integration and Formalization of Strategic Product Development and Commercialization in a Manufacturing Company -A Challenge for Supply Chain Management2008In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM), 2008, p. 532-539Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Kontopoulos, E.
    et al.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Konstantinidis, K.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Riga, M.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Mitzias, P.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Stavropoulos, T.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Andreadis, S.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Maronidis, A.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Karakostas, A.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Tachos, S.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Kaltsa, V.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Tsagiopoulu, M.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Avgerinakis, K.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Deliverable 4.5: Context-aware Content Interpretation2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current deliverable summarises the work conducted within task T4.5 of WP4, presenting our proposed approaches for contextualised content interpretation, aimed at gaining insightful contextualised views on content semantics. This is achieved through the adoption of appropriate context-aware semantic models developed within the project, and via enriching the semantic descriptions with background knowledge, deriving thus higher level contextualised content interpretations that are closer to human perception and appraisal needs. More specifically, the main contributions of the deliverable are the following: A theoretical framework using physics as a metaphor to develop different models of evolving semantic content. A set of proof-of-concept models for semantic drifts due to field dynamics, introducing two methods to identify quantum-like (QL) patterns in evolving information searching behaviour, and a QL model akin to particle-wave duality for semantic content classification. Integration of two specific tools, Somoclu for drift detection and Ncpol2spda for entanglement detection. An “energetic” hypothesis accounting for contextualized evolving semantic structures over time. A proposed semantic interpretation framework, integrating (a) an ontological inference scheme based on Description Logics (DL), (b) a rule-based reasoning layer built on SPARQL Inference Notation (SPIN), (c) an uncertainty management framework based on non-monotonic logics. A novel scheme for contextualized reasoning on semantic drift, based on LRM dependencies and OWL’s punning mechanism. An implementation of SPIN rules for policy and ecosystem change management, with the adoption of LRM preconditions and impacts. Specific use case scenarios demonstrate the context under development and the efficiency of the approach. Respective open-source implementations and experimental results that validate all the above.All these contributions are tightly interlinked with the other PERICLES work packages: WP2 supplies the use cases and sample datasets for validating our proposed approaches, WP3 provides the models (LRM and Digital Ecosystem models) that form the basis for our semantic representations of content and context, WP5 provides the practical application of the technologies developed to preservation processes, while the tools and algorithms presented in this deliverable can be deployed in combination with test scenarios, which will be part of the WP6 test beds.

  • 39. Larsson, J.
    Agent-based modelling in fashion demand chains.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40. Larsson, J
    et al.
    Petersson, J
    A Multiple Choise System for Designing Knitted Fashion Garments.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41. Larsson, J
    et al.
    Petersson, J
    Agent-based modelling in fashion demand chains.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Long Tail of Fashion2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With Internet as an increasingly important factor in world economy new methods of doing business has evolved. The long tail economy first became evident in the music and book industry. Record labels are no longer making huge profits on selling records due to free downloads in peer-to-peer networks but also due to the development of on-line music stores like iTunes and similar solutions where the consumer can choose freely between a wider selection of products. Not only is the long tail economy visible in music and film industry but also in the fashion market where there is an increasing number of small online stores and fashion blogs driving the demand down the long tail of products. And not only are consumers buying their way down the tail, revenues are also moving down the tail as blogers are earning by advertising in affiliated networks. Drivers in the new economy are the Internet, the democratization of production- and distribution tools and the connection of demand and supply. Which has made it possible for everybody with a computer and an Internet connection to produce and distribute music, films and to some extent consumer goods. The market is no longer as hit driven as in the past but increasingly driven by the niches and the future of business is selling less of more. In the long tail economy the 80/20 rule is no longer that evident - we are moving down the long tail of products and services

  • 43. Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Andersson, P
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Petersson, J
    Knit on Demand: Simulation of an Agile Production and Shop Model for Fashion Products.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Design for Mass Customized Knitted Garments2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically it has been only for the rich to have their suits, jackets, shoes and sweaters tailored. The rest of the population had to buy standard of the shelf mass-produced products. But as information technology and production techniques are refined, customized goods are made affordable to the masses and as volume goes up, prices go down. An increasingly number of companies is now offering customized goods to affordable prices and sometimes even cheaper then a mass produced garment. The idea is to offer the customer a garment that better suits his or her needs on fit, design and function. The main purpose of the paper is to analyse in what ways design for customization differs from regular design and how to build product architecture for customized knitwear. The challenge is to find out how many and which choices the customer should be able do in order to feel that he or she is designing the garment and translate these choices into a fully functioning concept. Customized garments generally need to be pre-engineered in order to assure lead-times, production-cost and quality, so the design cannot be completely free.

  • 45. Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Petersson, J.
    Ett kundanpassat flervalssystem för design av textila modeprodukter.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kinetic garment construction: remarks on the foundations of pattern cutting2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of different methods for pattern cutting, and the interest in this field has grown rapidly over the past few years. This growth is both due to the publication of a number of works dealing with the subject in different ways and the fact that a growing number of designers emphasise cutting in their creative practices.

    Though a range of methods and concepts for pattern cutting are presented, the main body of these methods, both traditional and contemporary, is predominately based on a theoretical approximation of the body that is derived from horizontal and vertical measurements of the body in an upright position: the tailoring matrix. As a consequence, there is a lack of interactive and dynamic qualities in methods connected to this paradigm of garment construction, from both expressional and functional perspectives.

    This work proposes and explores an alternative paradigm for pattern cutting that includes a new theoretical approximation of the body as well as a more kinetic method for garment construction that, unlike the prevalent theory and its related methods, takes as its point of origin the interaction between the anisotropic fabric and the biomechanical structure of the body. As such, the research conducted here is basic research, aiming to identify fundamental principles for garment construction. Based on some key principles found in the works of Geneviève Sevin-Doering and in pre-tailoring methods for constructing garments, the proposed theory for – and method of – garment construction was developed through concrete experiments by cutting and draping fabrics on live models.

    Instead of a static matrix of a non-moving body, the result is a kinetic construction theory of the body that is comprised of balance directions and key biomechanical points, along with an alternative draping method for dressmaking. This methodology challenges the fundamental relationship between dress, garment construction, and the body, working from the body outward, as opposed to the methods that are based on the prevalent paradigm of the tailoring matrix, which work from the outside toward the body. This alternative theory for understanding the body and the proposed method of working allows for diverse expressions and enhanced functional possibilities in dress.

  • 47.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Thornquist, Clemens
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Enhanced construction technology for ergonomic clothing: A new approximation of the body and system for garment construction.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the ergonomic and functional possibilities of a recently developed new principle of construction technology for garments based on a new approximation of the human body in garment development. Although there are several different principles of pattern construction, the far majority are derived from the same approximation of the body based on horizontal and vertical measurements. Based on Lindqvist’s[1] model for enhance pattern technology, building on a number of key biomechanical point and balance lines instead of horizontal and vertical measurements of the body, this paper demonstrates the potential of the proposed technology in two garments for a specific function. The relevance of this new garment construction technology is significance because it presents a previously unknown model to construct garments with significantly increased ergonomics and agility as well as presenting a new theory of

  • 48.
    Lundborg, Niclas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Nordling, Jonathan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Att Göra Gårdagens Arbete Till Morgondagens Vinst: Erfarenhetsåterföring För Vinstmaximering Inom Byggsektorn2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The construction industry has more undeveloped improvement work and standardized processes than its counterparts in manufacturing, which leads to scientific research openings and development opportunities. In the construction industry, waste may account for 35 % of the total production cost of a construction project. Through the utilization of knowledge and the experience that the companies possesses, the waste may be reduced.The purpose of this thesis is to determine a standardized process for experience feedback. This thesis will analyze and describe how experience and knowledge may be distributed throughout the company by using standardized processes and tools. The application of standardized tools and processes within the improvement work is based on guidelines for experience feedback. This thesis focuses on experience feedback for the whole construction process, from projection of a construction project until its finalization.The thesis was designed through a qualitative cross sectional study and was executed at the construction company Wästbygg. Empiric data was obtained through interviews, which was given a semi structural design for the enablement of a more precise study. Based on empirical studies, research shows how essential experience feedback is. Moreover, the research shows that absent experience feedback is caused by obstructive factors, rather than a commitment towards continual improvement. Lack of standardized processes for continual improvement contributes to difficulties within the area of experience feedback, as well as the time constraints that occur from moving to a new project. Experience feedback throughout written documents within a database is too complicated according to the empiric studies. To obtain a successful experience feedback, verbal communication tools should be used. Therefore, it is essential with continuous systematic experience feedback during the entire construction process.

  • 49.
    Mansur, Rubina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Svensson Johnson, Carolin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kartläggning av interna mjölkrundor: En analys av kartongflöden hos Volvo Lastvagnar Tuve2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To identify how a company's different processes look is an important part of continuousimprovement work. The assignment for this study consists of mapping the daily in-plant milkrunsin one part of the factory, with the goal to make any problems visible. The study deals withlogistics and materials management with a focus on transport and ergonomic aspects that shouldbe in line with Lean thinking. The starting point in this study has been information frominterviews and observations, to provide a good understanding for the in-plant milk-runs. Thestudy includes a brief literature review, onsite observations as well as three in-depth interviews.A comparison was made between the strategy Lean and Volvo's own interpretation of Lean, theVolvo Production System, where the emphasis was highlighted in the standardized approachand that the company standardizes the different workflows to facilitate implementation of theimprovement proposals. The study concludes by formulating proposals on how milk-runsshould look to enable savings in the efficiency perspective and other improvement proposalsthat will benefit the whole company. The author’s conclusion of the thesis work is that there aregood opportunities to positively introduce standardized milk runs for the studied area calledbasmodulen, which will help the company when implementing the improvements.

  • 50.
    Maronidis, A.
    et al.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Chatzilari, E.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Kontopoulos, E.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Nikopoulos, S.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Riga, M.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Mitzias, P.
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Gill, A.
    King's College London, UK.
    Tonkin, E.L.
    King's College London, UK.
    De Weerdt, D.
    SpaceApps, Belgium.
    Corubolo, F.
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Waddington, S.
    King's College London, UK.
    Sauter, Ch.
    King's College London, UK.
    PERICLES Deliverable 4.3: Content Semantics and Use Context Analysis Techniques2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current deliverable summarises the work conducted within task T4.3 of WP4, focusing on the extraction and the subsequent analysis of semantic information from digital content, which is imperative for its preservability. More specifically, the deliverable defines content semantic information from a visual and textual perspective, explains how this information can be exploited in long-term digital preservation and proposes novel approaches for extracting this information in a scalable manner. Additionally, the deliverable discusses novel techniques for retrieving and analysing the context of use of digital objects. Although this topic has not been extensively studied by existing literature, we believe use context is vital in augmenting the semantic information and maintaining the usability and preservability of the digital objects, as well as their ability to be accurately interpreted as initially intended.

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