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  • 1.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Environmental impacts of food waste in a life cycle perspective: A case study in a Swedish supermarket2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The food production system has been acknowledged as a problem that needs to be addressed in order to achieve a sustainable society. Hertwich and Peters (2009), estimate that 10-30% of an individual’s environmental impact is related to the industrial production and consumption of food. The problem is aggravated by the wastage of one third of the global food production. The consequences of the wastage of food are the loss of resources, such as energy, water, land and labour and unnecessary emissions of pollutants.

    In order to address this problem several actions have been proposed. The Sustainable Development Goal 12.3, which Sweden has committed to fulfil, aims to reduce by half the amount of food waste along the production and supply chain by 2030.

    Retail is an important player in the food supply chain. Its influence spreads both upstream to suppliers and downstream to consumers. Therefore, this research aims to contribute to reduction of the environmental impacts related to food waste in retail, by identifying products with high environmental impacts. The main goals of this study are 1) the quantification of food waste produced by the supermarket and 2) to examine the environmental impacts of selected products in order to assess the impacts generated by the waste production at the supermarket.

    The findings of the research revealed 1) the importance of not only measuring the food waste in terms of mass, but also in terms of environmental indicators and costs. The results indicate bread as an important contributor for the environmental footprint of the supermarket and a potential product for interventions 2) Sorting the organic content of the products from its packaging before sending it to the current waste treatment leads to a reduction in the carbon footprint.

    The research identified the following recommendations: 1) increasing supermarket personnel and consumers’ awareness regarding the environmental impact of food waste, 2) finding alternative routes for waste treatment and 3) improving logistic operations.

  • 2.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    LCA as a Supporting Tool for Supermarket Food Waste Management2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Life cycle assessment of supermarket food waste2017In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 118, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retail is an important actor regarding waste throughout the entire food supply chain. Although it produces lower amounts of waste compared to other steps in the food value chain, such as households and agriculture, it has a significant influence on the supply chain, including both suppliers in the upstream processes and consumers in the downstream. The research presented in this contribution analyses the impacts of food waste at a supermarket in Sweden. In addition to shedding light on which waste fractions have the largest environmental impacts and what part of the waste life cycle is responsible for the majority of the impacts, the results provide information to support development of strategies and actions to reduce of the supermarket's environmental footprint. Therefore, the food waste was categorised and quantified over the period of one year, the environmental impacts of waste that were generated regularly and in large amounts were assessed, and alternative waste management practices were suggested. The research revealed the importance of not only measuring the food waste in terms of mass, but also in terms of environmental impacts and economic costs. The results show that meat and bread waste contributes the most to the environmental footprint of the supermarket. Since bread is a large fraction of the food waste for many Swedish supermarkets, this is a key item for actions aimed at reducing the environmental footprint of supermarkets. Separation of waste packaging from its food content at the source and the use of bread as animal feed were investigated as alternative waste treatment routes and the results show that both have the potential to lead to a reduction in the carbon footprint of the supermarket.

  • 4.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Environmental impacts of supermarket food waste in a life cycle perspective2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Johansson, Andreas
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Blomqvist, Evalena
    Ekvall, Annika
    Gustavsson, Lennart
    Tullin, Claes
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Jarlsvik, Tisse
    Assarsson, Anders
    Peters, Gunnar
    Report: Waste Refinery in the Municipality of Borås2007In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Kabir, Maryam M.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Forgács, Gergely
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sárvári Horváth, Ilona
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Pretreatment of wool based textile wastes for enhanced biogas production2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two different wool based textile wastes (TW1 and TW2) have been subjected for biogas production. TW1 was composed of 70% wool and 30% polyamide (PA), while TW2 consisted of 70% wool, 18% PA and 12% kermel (protective polyamide-imide fibre). Two pre-treatments: thermal treatment, enzymatic treatment and combinations of these two were performed to enhance the methane yield. Determining the soluble protein concentrations in the treated samples showed that the additional thermal treatment and the enzyme concentration had significant positive effect on the degradation of wool. Samples treated with thermal and combination treatments were therefore selected for anaerobic batch digestion assays. The best results were obtained after combination treatments resulting in methane yields of 0.33-0.43 Nm3/kg VS, and 0.21-0.26 Nm3/kg VS, for TW1 and TW2, respectively, while only 0.21 and 0.05 Nm3/kg VS methane production was measured after the thermal treatment. The methane yields of untreated samples were close to zero.

  • 7.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Periyasamy, Aravin Prince
    Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic.
    Rwawiire, Samson
    Busitema University, Tororo, Uganda.
    Zhao, Yan
    Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China.
    Sustainable Wastewater Treatment Methods for Textile Industry2018In: Sustainable Innovations in Apparel Production / [ed] Subramanian Senthilkannan Muthu, Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All over the world, environmental considerations are now becoming vital factors during the selection of consumer goods which include textiles. According to the World Bank, 20% of water pollution globally is caused by textile processing, which means that these industries produce vast amounts of wastewater. Generally, these effluents contain high levels of suspended solids (SS), phosphates, dyes, salts, organo-pesticides, non-biodegradable organics, and heavy metals. Increase in water scarcity and environmental regulations has led to textile industries to seek for sustainable wastewater treatment methods which help to reduce their water footprint as well as reduce their operational costs. Therefore, sustainable wastewater treatment could be the best choice for the textile industries with respect to the current issues. So, it is important to discuss and champion awareness mechanisms which help to reduce the current issues with respect to the textile wastewater. Therefore, this chapter intends to discuss the various sustainable wastewater treatments, namely granular activated carbon (GAC), electrocoagulation (EC), ultrasonic treatment, an advanced oxidation process (AOP), ozonation, membrane biological reactor (MBR), and sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

  • 8.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Persson, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Reusing Textile Waste As Reinforcements In Composites2014In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 131, no 17, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyester (PET) has wide applications in textile industries as textile fiber and its share continues to grow. Substantial quantities of cotton/polyester blend fabrics are disposed every year due to technical challenges, which pose a big environmental and waste-dumping problem. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of discarded cotton/PET fabrics as raw materials for composites. If their inherent reinforcement properties can be used in composites, an ecological footprint issue can be solved. In this study, we investigate three concepts for reuse of cotton/PET fabrics for composites: compression molding above the Tm of PETs, use of a matrix derived from renewable soybean oil, use of thermoplastic copolyester/polyester bi-component fibers as matrix. All three concepts have been explored to make them available for wider applications. The effects of processing parameters such as compression temperature, time and pressure are considered in all three cases. The third concept gives the most appealing properties, which combine good tensile properties with toughness; more than four times better tensile strength than the first concept; and 2.2 times better than the second concept.

  • 9.
    Rousta, Kamran
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dahlén, Lisa
    Quantitative assessment of distance to collection point and improved sorting information on source separation of household waste2015In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 40, no 0, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study measures the participation of households in a source separation scheme and, in particular, if the household’s application of the scheme improved after two interventions: (a) shorter distance to the drop-off point and (b) easy access to correct sorting information. The effect of these interventions was quantified and, as far as possible, isolated from other factors that can influence the recycling behaviour. The study was based on households located in an urban residential area in Sweden, where waste composition studies were performed before and after the interventions by manual sorting (pick analysis). Statistical analyses of the results indicated a significant decrease (28%) of packaging and newsprint in the residual waste after establishing a property close collection system (intervention (a)), as well as significant decrease (70%) of the miss-sorted fraction in bags intended for food waste after new information stickers were introduced (intervention (b)). Providing a property close collection system to collect more waste fractions as well as finding new communication channels for information about sorting can be used as tools to increase the source separation ratio. This contribution also highlights the need to evaluate the effects of different types of information and communication concerning sorting instructions in a property close collection system.

  • 10.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Energy Generation from Wastes2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wastes and residuals are undeniably part of human society. The accumulation of these materials and the “throw-away philosophy” result in many environmental and health issues and safety hazard problems, and prevent sustainable development in terms of resource recovery and recycling of waste materials. The carbon sources in the wastes can be converted to energy (electricity, heat, chill, fuels) and even materials using different technologies including collecting and converting current landfill gases, wet or dry anaerobic digestion to biogas, incineration, gasification and pyrolysis. Sweden has been one of the pioneers in waste management and resource recovery with more than 30 years development. The MSW of 150,000,000 inhabitants (with a typical composition and amount similar to the Nordic European countries) can be converted to about 1,000-5,000 MW electricity, depending on the technology used.

  • 11.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol and fish food from old jeans2011Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
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