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  • 1. Adrian-Kalchhauser, I
    et al.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Kutschera, VE
    Alm Rosenblad, M
    Pippel, M
    Winkler, S
    Schloissnig, S
    Blomberg, A
    Burkhardt-Holm, P
    Pomatoschistus minutus voucher NRM:NRM69326 mitochondrion, complete genome: GenBank: MW0928272020Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complete Pomatoschistus minutus mitochondrion genome. The voucher NRM:NRM69326 is stored at The Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden. The Genbank Accession number of the annotated sequence MW092827.

  • 2.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Green, Leon
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Lindström, Kail
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Schöld, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Griful-Dones, Marina
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leder, Erica
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fish ART & sperm performance2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In species with alternative reproductive tactics (ART), parasitically spawning males have larger testes and greater sperm numbers as an evolved response to a higher degree of sperm competition. But do they also have higher sperm performance? We used sand gobies to test if it differs between breeding-coloured and sneaker-morph males. We compared sperm motility, velocity, longevity, morphometrics and gene expression of testes between the two morphs. We found 109 transcripts differentially expressed between the morphs. Notably, several mucin genes were upregulated in breeding-coloured males and two ATP-related genes were upregulated in sneaker-morph males. There was partial evidence of higher sperm velocity in sneaker-morph males, but no difference in sperm motility. Sand gobies have remarkably long-lived sperm, with almost no decline in motility and velocity over 22 hours, but again, this was equally true for both morphs. Sperm length did not differ between morphs and did not correlate with sperm velocity for either morph. Thus, other than a clear difference in testes gene expression, we found only modest differences between the two male morphs, confirming previous findings that increased sperm performance as an adaptation to sperm competition does not appear to be a primary target of evolution.

  • 3.
    Leder, Erica H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Le Moan, Alan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Töpel, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindström, Kai
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Volckaert, Filip A. M.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Kvarnemo, Lotta
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson,
    Data from: Post‐glacial establishment of locally adapted fish populations over a steep salinity gradient2020Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of colonization of new habitats that appear from rapidly changing environments are interesting and highly relevant to our understanding of divergence and speciation. Here, we analyse phenotypic and genetic variation involved in the successful establishment of a marine fish (sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus) over a steep salinity drop from 35 PSU in the North Sea (NE Atlantic) to two PSU in the inner parts of the post-glacial Baltic Sea. We first show that populations are adapted to local salinity in a key reproductive trait, the proportion of motile sperm. Thereafter, we show that genome variation at 22,190 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shows strong differentiation among populations along the gradient. Sequences containing outlier SNPs and transcriptome sequences, mapped to a draft genome, reveal associations with genes with relevant functions for adaptation in this environment but without overall evidence of functional enrichment. The many contigs involved suggest polygenic differentiation. We trace the origin of this differentiation using demographic modelling and find the most likely scenario is that at least part of the genetic differentiation is older than the Baltic Sea and is a result of isolation of two lineages prior to the current contact over the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition zone.

  • 4. Levan, G
    et al.
    Sandberg, P
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dahllöf, B
    Martinsson, T
    Wettergren, Y
    Selective gene amplification in mammalian cells1984In: Hereditas, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. , 1984, p. 278-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective gene amplification in mammalian cells is now recognized as a common cellular response to selection in a number of different toxic drugs, such as methotrexate (MTX). coformycin, PALA, hydroxyurea (HU), vincristine (VCR). colcemid (COL) and actinomycin D (AMD). Recently, we have studied SEWA murine tumor cells in culture exhibiting the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) phenotype. Cells subjected to stepwise selection in AMD, VCR or COL all develop double minute chromosomes (DM), which are a cytogenetic expression of gene amplification. These lines overproduce a 21 K acidic soluble protein and show a high degree of cross resistance, which is typical for the PDR phenotype. Other workers have shown that cells with this phenotype exhibit a shift in membrane-bound glycoproteins from 90- 100 K to 150-170 K. Thus, it is likely that several genes are involved in the development of the PDR phenotype. We have isolated a fraction highly enriched in DM from an AMD-resistant SEWA subline. DNA was extracted from this fraction, and several DM-specific DNA-probes were developed. These probes were used to study independently derived SEWA sublines resistant to AMD, VCR, COL, MTX and HU. The results showed that the investigated amplified DNA-segments in AMD-, VCR-. and COL-resistant lines exhibited a high degree of sequence sequence homology, indicating that basically the same segment was amplified in the 3 inductions. In contrast. the amplified DNA-segments in MTX- and HU-resistant lines that do not show the PDR phenotype, displayed no sequence homology to the probes used.

  • 5.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Klinga-Levan, K
    Levan, G
    Szpirer, J
    Szpirer, C
    The rat gene map 1996: fall revision1996Report (Other academic)
  • 6. Ståhl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Wettergren, Y
    Levan, G
    Amplification and overexpression of the mouse mdria gene in nine independently selected multidrug-resistant SEWA murine cell lines1993In: Hereditas, ISSN 0018-0661, E-ISSN 1601-5223, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many different drugs may be used in selecting cells for multidrug resistance (MDR). Enhanced expression and/or gene amplification is known to cause overproduction of membrane-bound 170,000 P-glycoproteins, responsible for the MDR. In rodents, the P-glycoproteins are encoded by a small gene family: mdr 1a, mdr 1b, and mdr2. To evaluate the relationship between the pattern of MDR and the selecting drug, nine MDR sublines were independently selected from a sensitive mouse tumor cell line, SEWATC13K, using three different drugs. Each MDR subline displayed amplification of one or more of the three mdr genes, but only one, mdr 1a, was consistently overexpressed. Thus, our results indicate that the pattern of mdr gene amplification and overexpression is independent of the selective agent. Furthermore, in four of the MDR sublines, where all three mdr genes had been originally amplified, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that amplification of mdr 1a, only, was a second step of gene amplification. In addition, the gene for the calcium-binding protein, sorcin, was coamplified in eight of the nine MDR sublines. The sorcin gene was overexpressed in seven of these eight sublines. Finally, hybridizations with a probe homologous with a putative region of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism), indicated that the amplified sequences originate from one or the other of the two homologous chromosomes with no preference.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Leder, Erica
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindström, Kai
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Behavioural and genomic analyses of locally adapted sand goby populations over a steep salinity gradient2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of colonization of new habitats appearing from rapidly changing environments increase our understanding of populations’ potential to cope with environmental changes. Here, we analyse behavioural, phenotypic and genetic variation involved in the successful establishment of the sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus, over a steep salinity drop from 35 PSU in the North Sea (NE Atlantic) to two PSU in the inner parts of the post-glacial Baltic Sea. We show e.g. that populations are adapted to local salinity in a key reproductive trait, the proportion of motile sperm, which in itself may result in reproductive isolation caused by natural selection on immigrants. Genome variation shows strong differentiation among populations along the gradient. Sand gobies in the current Baltic Sea lineage is adapted to the low salinity in traits related to osmoregulation and reproduction, but also to both abiotic and biotic environmental factors correlated to salinity evident in traits such as vision and immune function. The salinity-biotic factors correlation is omnipresent in behavioral studies. Many loci also appear to be involved in these traits, but the specific functional mechanism (e.g., coding sequence, regulatory loci) remains to be clarified. We conclude that the first steps on the speciation continuum trajectory have been taken.

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    fulltext
  • 8.
    Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Leder, Erica
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindström, Kai
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Post-glacial establishment of locally adapted sand goby populations over a steep salinity gradient2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of colonization of new habitats that appear from rapidly changing environments are interesting and highly relevant to our understanding of divergence and speciation. Here, we analyse phenotypic and genetic variation involved in the successful establishment of a marine fish (sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus) over a steep salinity drop from 35 PSU in the North Sea (NE Atlantic) to two PSU in the inner parts of the post-glacial Baltic Sea. We first show that populations are adapted to local salinity in a key reproductive trait, the proportion of motile sperm, which in itself may result in reproductive isolation caused by natural selection on immigrants. Thereafter, we show that genome variation at 22,190 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shows strong differentiation among populations along the gradient. Sequences containing outlier SNPs and transcriptome sequences, mapped to a draft genome, reveal associations with genes with relevant functions for adaptation in this environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Woodhouse, Katie
    Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Hull , Hull , United Kingdom.
    Smith, Alan
    Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Hull , Hull , United Kingdom.
    Seehausen, Ole
    Department of Fish Ecology and Evolution, Center for Ecology, Evolution and Biogeochemistry, Eawag—Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology , Kastanienbaum , Switzerland;Division of Aquatic Ecology and Evolution, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Turner, George F
    School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Bangor University , Bangor , United Kingdom.
    Data from: Sympatry and parapatry among rocky reef cichlids of Lake Victoria explained by female mating preferences [Dataset]2024Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Work on the Lake Victoria cichlids Pundamilia nyererei (red dorsum males, deeper water), Pundamilia pundamilia (blue males, shallower water) and related species pairs has provided insights into processes of speciation. Here, we investigate female mating behaviour of five Pundamilia species and four of their F1-hybrids through mate choice trials and paternity testing. We discuss the results in the context of the geography of speciation and coexistence. Complete assortative mating was observed among all sympatric species. Parapatric species with similar depth habitat distributions interbred whereas other parapatric and allopatric species showed complete assortative mating. F1-hybrids mated exclusively with species accepted by females of the parental species. Although consistent with reinforcement in sympatry, a closer look at our results suggests otherwise and it is more likely that pre-existing female preferences influence which taxa can co-exist in sympatry. Regardless of the mechanism, mating preferences may influence species distribution in potentially hybridizing taxa, such as in the adaptive radiations of cichlid fish. We suggest that this at least partly explains why some species fail to establish breeding populations in locations where they are occasionally recorded. Our result support the notion that mating preferences of potentially cross-breeding species ought to be included in coexistence theory.

    Download full text (zip)
    dataset
  • 10.
    Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Woodhouse, Katie
    Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Hull , Hull , United Kingdom.
    Smith, Alan
    Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Hull , Hull , United Kingdom.
    Seehausen, Ole
    Department of Fish Ecology and Evolution, Center for Ecology, Evolution and Biogeochemistry, Eawag—Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Kastanienbaum, Switzerland;Division of Aquatic Ecology and Evolution, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Turner, George F
    School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor, United Kingdom.
    Supporting information about Pundamilia azurea, Pundamilia igneopinnis, Pundamilia nyererei, Pundamilia pundamilia and Pundamilia sp. ‘red head’: Supplementary Material S12023Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among all known Lake Victoria haplochromines, females alone brood the eggs and fry in their mouths, occasional exceptions in the lab notwithstanding (Seehausen 1996). Free-swimming fry are guarded for a few days (Seehausen, 1996). Long-term pair bonds are unknown, and the offspring of a single clutch may be sired by multiple males (Svensson et al., 2017). Females are generally more cryptic, whereas males are larger, more conspicuous and aggressively territorial (Seehausen, 1996). The males have bright nuptial colouration of either one of three patterns that are widespread among Lake Victoria cichlid species and referred to as ‘blue’, ‘red dorsum’ or ‘red chest’ (Seehausen et al., 1998; Seehausen and van Alphen, 1999), each of which also exists in melanic forms where the underlying colour pattern can be largely disguised. Among rocky shore cichlids, these different colour pattern groups are associated with different habitats: ‘blue’ and ‘red chest’ males breed in shallow water over gently sloping substrate, ‘red dorsum’ males breed in similar habitats but deeper, and melanic forms breed even deeper or at steeply dropping rock faces (Seehausen, 1996). The five species of the present study belong to a complex of more than 20 congeneric taxa (Seehausen, 1996; Seehausen et al., 1998). They originate from south-eastern Lake Victoria (Tanzania) around islands in the Speke Gulf; Igombe Island, Makobe Island, Ruti Island, Zue Island, not further apart than 50km (Figure 1). All have similar ecology, inhabiting rocky shores and reefs and feeding largely on plankton and benthic invertebrates (Bouton et al., 1997; Maan et al., 2008; Seehausen, 1996; Seehausen et al., 1998). Their phylogenetic relationships are complicated and characterized by lineage fusion through admixture and lineage fission through speciation (Meier et al., in press).

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Woodhouse, Katie
    Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Hull , Hull , United Kingdom.
    Smith, Alan
    Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Hull , Hull , United Kingdom.
    Seehausen, Ole
    Department of Fish Ecology and Evolution, Center for Ecology, Evolution and Biogeochemistry, Eawag—Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology , Kastanienbaum , Switzerland;Division of Aquatic Ecology and Evolution, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern , Bern , Switzerland.
    Turner, George F
    School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Bangor University , Bangor , United Kingdom.
    Sympatry and parapatry among rocky reef cichlids of Lake Victoria explained by female mating preferences2023In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work on the Lake Victoria cichlids Pundamilia nyererei (red dorsum males, deeper water), Pundamilia pundamilia (blue males, shallower water) and related species pairs has provided insights into processes of speciation. Here, we investigate the female mating behaviour of 5 Pundamilia species and 4 of their F1 hybrids through mate choice trials and paternity testing. Complete assortative mating was observed among all sympatric species. Parapatric species with similar depth habitat distributions interbred whereas other parapatric and allopatric species showed complete assortative mating. F1 hybrids mated exclusively with species accepted by females of the parental species. The existence of complete assortative mating among some currently allopatric species suggests that pre-existing mating barriers could be sufficient to explain current patterns of co-existence, although, of course, many other factors may be involved. Regardless of the mechanism, mating preferences may influence species distribution in potentially hybridizing taxa, such as in the adaptive radiation of cichlid fish. We suggest that this at least partly explains why some species fail to establish breeding populations in locations where they are occasionally recorded. Our results support the notion that the mating preferences of potentially cross-breeding species ought to be included in coexistence theory.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12. Svensson, Ola
    et al.
    Woodhouse, Katie
    University of Hull, UK.
    van Oosterhout, Cock
    University of East Anglia, UK.
    Smith,
    University of Hull, UK.
    Turner,
    Bangor University, UK.
    Seehausen, Ole
    University of Bern, UK.
    Data from: The genetics of mate preferences in hybrids between two young and sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid species2017Data set
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic architecture of mate preferences is likely to affect significant evolutionary processes, including speciation and hybridization. Here, we investigate laboratory hybrids between a pair of sympatric Lake Victoria cichlid fish species that appear to have recently evolved from a hybrid population between similar predecessor species. The species demonstrate strong assortative mating in the laboratory, associated with divergent male breeding coloration (red dorsum versus blue). We show in a common garden experiment, using DNA-based paternity testing, that the strong female mate preferences among males of the two species are fully recovered in a large fraction of their F2 hybrid generation. Individual hybrid females often demonstrated consistent preferences in multiple mate choice trials (more than or equal to five) across a year or more. This result suggests that female mate preference is influenced by relatively few major genes or genomic regions. These preferences were not changed by experience of a successful spawning event with a male of the non-preferred species in a no-choice single-male trial. We found no evidence for imprinting in the F2 hybrids, although the F1 hybrid females may have been imprinted on their mothers. We discuss this nearly Mendelian inheritance of consistent innate mate preferences in the context of speciation theory.

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