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  • 1.
    Awasthi, S. K.
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Duan, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Liu, T.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Pandey, A.
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow 226 001, India.
    Varjani, S.
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar - 382010, Gujarat, India.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Can biochar regulate the fate of heavy metals (Cu and Zn) resistant bacteria community during the poultry manure composting?2021In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 406, article id 124593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the influence of coconut shell biochar addition (CSB) on heavy metals (Cu and Zn) resistance bacterial fate and there correlation with physicochemical parameters were evaluated during poultry manure composting. High-throughput sequencing was carried out on five treatments, namely T1−T5, where T2 to T5 were supplemented with 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% CSB, while T1 was used as control for the comparison. The results of HMRB indicated that the relative abundance of major potential bacterial host altered were Firmicutes (52.88–14.32%), Actinobacteria (35.20–4.99%), Bacteroidetes (0.05–15.07%) and Proteobacteria (0.01–20.28%) with elevated biochar concentration (0%−10%). Beta and alpha diversity as well as network analysis illustrated composting micro-environmental ecology with exogenous additive biochar to remarkably affect the dominant resistant bacterial community distribution by adjusting the interacting between driving environmental parameters with potential host bacterial in composting. Ultimately, the amendment of 7.5% CSB into poultry manure composting was able to significantly reduce the HMRB abundance, improve the composting efficiency and end product quality. 

  • 2.
    Awasthi, S. K.
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Duan, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Liu, T.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Zhou, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Qin, S.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Liu, H.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Varjani, S.
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 382010, India.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Pandey, A.
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, 226 001, India.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sequential presence of heavy metal resistant fungal communities influenced by biochar amendment in the poultry manure composting process2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 291, article id 125947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigated the influence of coconut shell biochar (CSB) on heavy metal resistance fungi (HMRF) during poultry manure (PM) composting by 18 S rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Amplicon Sequencing analysis. Five different concentrations of CSB (2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% dry weights basis) were applied with a mixture of PM and wheat straw (5:1 ratio dry weight basis) and without CSB (CK) was used as control. The results showed that sequence number rose along with increasing CSB concentration but total relative abundance (RA) of HMRF decreased 56.33%, 74.65% in T4 and T5, respectively. However, greater RA of HMRF was found in T1 or without biochar applied treatment. The phylum of Basidiomycota was the dominant fungal community accounting for 61.14%, 6.16%, 32.18%, 74.65%, and 73.73% from T1 to T5 of the total fungi abundance, with wide presence of the Wallemiomycetes and Eurotiomycetes classes. The Wallemia and Aspergillus were the richest genus and species. Wallemia_sebi, Altemaria_alternata and Aspergillus_amoenus were detected having greater abundance among all treatments. Besides this, the network correlation pattern confirmed that the relative greater percentage of correlation among dominant HMRF community with bio-available HM and other physicochemical factors increased with the addition of biochar. There was reasonable infer that the biochar amendment in composting could constitute favorable habitat for an active fungal population. 

  • 3.
    Bilal, Muhammad
    et al.
    Huaiyin Institute of Technology, China.
    Qamar, Sarmad Ahmad
    East China University of Science and Technology, China.
    Yadav, Vivek
    Northwest A&F University, China.
    Cheng, Hairong
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China.
    Khan, Mujeeb
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Adil, Syed Farooq
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Iqbal, Hafiz M. N.
    School of Engineering and Sciences, Mexico.
    Exploring the potential of ligninolytic armory for lignin valorization: A way forward for sustainable and cleaner production2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 326, article id 129420Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin is a key structural constituent of lignocellulosic biomasses that have substantial untapped potential to substitute environmentally unfriendly and non-renewable fossil-based resources. Unfortunately, multifaceted composition, heterogeneity, and structural recalcitrance of the lignin are the biggest technical challenges for its effective deconstruction and bioconversions to an array of bio-based products, e.g., specialty chemicals and biomaterials. Physicochemical methods for lignin depolymerization require strict reaction conditions, high en-ergy to execute processes, and environmental apprehensions. In contrast, biological platforms harnessing the catalytic potentiality of microorganisms and their robust enzymatic armory are thought to be efficient means for lignin decomposition. Enzymes, derived from natural origin, are highly proficient and eco-friendly biocatalysts that manifest high selectivity, require milder reaction conditions, and reduce resource requirements. The utili-zation of enzymes for lignin conversion and pre-treatment of biomass for detergent, textile, pulp and papers, and food sector applications has been investigated for decades. Herein, we reviewed lignin bioconversion by bio-logical means, focusing on ligninolytic enzyme-assisted pretreatment approaches. In the first half, we outlined the lignin as a multipurpose raw feedstock, fixation of CO2 to lignin biosynthesis and tailored lignin approach, and sources and types of lignin. The bio-based pre-treatment approaches for lignin depolymerization, including white-rot fungi, brown-rot fungi, bacteria, and ligninolytic enzymes, i.e., manganese peroxidase (MnP) lignin peroxidase (LiP), Laccase (Lac), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyP) are thor-oughly vetted in the second half.

  • 4.
    Bulkan, Gülru
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Yudhanti, Gerarda Tania
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Sitaresmi, Sitaresmi
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Millati, Ria
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Wikandari, Rachma
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Inhibitory and Stimulatory Effects of Fruit Bioactive Compounds on Edible Filamentous Fungi: Potential for Innovative Food Applications2022In: Fermentation, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fermentation of fruit processing residuals (FPRs) with filamentous fungi can provide protein-rich food products. However, FPRs that contain bioactive compounds with antimicrobial properties present a major challenge. In this work, the resistance of two edible filamentous fungi, Rhizopus oligosporus and Neurospora intermedia, to 10 typically inhibiting bioactive compounds available in FPRs (epicatechin, quercetin, ellagic acid, betanin, octanol, hexanal, D-limonene, myrcene, car-3-ene, and ascorbic acid) was examined. These compounds’ inhibitory and stimulatory effects on fungal growth were examined individually. Three different concentrations (2.4, 24, and 240 mg/L) within the natural concentration range of these compounds in FPRs were tested. These bioactive compounds stimulated the growth yield and glucose consumption rate of R. oligosporus, while there was no increase in the biomass yield of N. intermedia. Ellagic acid caused an up to four-fold increase in the biomass yield of R. oligosporus. In addition, octanol and D-limonene showed antifungal effects against N. intermedia. These results may be helpful in the development of fungus-based novel fermented foods. View Full-Text

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  • 5.
    Chandolias, Konstantinos
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pawar, Sudhanshu S.
    Circular Solutions, Fortum Sverige AB, Sweden.
    Vu, Hoang Danh
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wainaina, Steven
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bio‑hydrogen and VFA production from steel mill gases using pure and mixed bacterial cultures2023In: Bioresource Technology Reports, ISSN 2589-014X, Vol. 23, article id 101544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major source of CO2 emissions is the flaring of steel mill gas. This work demonstrated the enrichment of carboxydotrophic bacteria for converting steel mill gas into volatile fatty acids and H2, via gas fermentation. Several combinations of pure and mixed anaerobic cultures were used as inoculum in 0.5-L reactors, operated at 30 and 60 °C. The process was then scaled up in a 4-L membrane bioreactor, operated for 20 days, at 48 °C. The results showed that the enriched microbiomes can oxidize CO completely to produce H2/H+ which is subsequently used to fix the CO2. At 30 °C, a mixture of acetate, isobutyrate and propionate was obtained while H2 and acetate were the main products at 60 °C. The highest CO conversion and H2 production rate observed in the membrane bioreactor were 29 and 28 mL/LR/h, respectively. The taxonomic diversity of the bacterial community increased and the dominant species was Pseudomonas.

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  • 6.
    Deng, Y.
    et al.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Ruan, Y.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Chen, J.
    Institute of Bioresource Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing 210009, China.
    Qi, W.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Kong, D.
    Agricultural Experiment Station, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Ma, B.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Xu, X.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Lu, H.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Carbon availability shifts the nitrogen removal pathway and microbial community in biofilm airlift reactor2021In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 323, article id 124568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the response of nitrogen removal performance and microbial community to different carbon composites in biofilm airlift reactors for wastewater treatment. Three reactors were filled with poly (butylene succinate) and bamboo powder composite at the blending ratio of 9:1, 1:1 and 1:9. Increasing the component of bamboo powder in the carrier reduced the carbon availability and had an adverse effect on nitrate removal efficiency. However, bamboo powder improved the ammonia removal rate which mainly through autotrophic nitrification. Three reactors exhibited distinct microbial compositions in both bacterial and fungal diversity. High inclusion of bamboo power decreased the relative abundance of denitrifiers Denitromonas and increased the relative abundance of nitrifiers, including Nitromonas, Nitrospina and Nitrospira. Moreover, correlation network revealed a competitive interaction between the taxa responsible for ammonia removal and nitrate removal processes. Those results indicated the feasibility of steering nitrogen removal pathway through carrier formulation in wastewater treatment.

  • 7.
    Devanthi, P V P
    et al.
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Kho, K
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Nurdiansyah, R
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Briot, A
    Bioprocess & Process Engineering Department, Polytech Nantes, University of Nantes, Gavy Océanis, CS 70152, 44633 Saint-Nazaire, France.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Aslanzadeh, S
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Do Kombucha Symbiotic Cultures of Bacteria and Yeast Affect Bacterial Cellulose Yield in Molasses?2021In: JOURNAL OF FUNGI, ISSN 2309-608X, Vol. 7, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a valuable biopolymer typically observed in Kombucha with many potential food applications. Many studies highlight yeast's roles in providing reducing sugars, used by the bacteria to grow and produce BC. However, whether yeast could enhance the BC yields remains unclear. This study investigates the effect of yeast Dekkera bruxellensis on bacteria Komagataeibacter intermedius growth and BC production in molasses medium. The results showed that the co-culture stimulated K. intermedius by similar to 2 log CFU/mL, which could be attributed to enhanced reducing sugar utilization. However, BC yields decreased by similar to 24%, suggesting a negative impact of D. bruxellensis on BC production. In contrast to other studies, regardless of D. bruxellensis, K. intermedius increased the pH to similar to 9.0, favoring the BC production. Furthermore, pH increase was slower in co-culture as compared to single culture cultivation, which could be the reason for lower BC yields. This study indicates that co-culture could promote synergistic growth but results in the BC yield reduction. This knowledge can help design a more controlled fermentation process for optimum bacterial growth and, ultimately, BC production.

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  • 8.
    Duan, Y M
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Wu, H H
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Yang, J F
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Li, Z L
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Ni, X H
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, J T
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z Q
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Li, H K
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Biochar regulates bacterial-fungal diversity and associated enzymatic activity during sheep manure composting2022In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aimed to evaluate the coexistence of bacterial and fungal diversity and their correlation with enzymatic activity in response to biochar. This study performed aerobic composting based on typical agricultural wastes of sheep manure with additive apple tree branch biochar at distinct concentration (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 12.5% corresponding from T1 to T6). The result demonstrated that appropriate amendment of biochar enriched bacterial diversity (1646-1686 OTUs) but interestingly decreased fungal diversity (542-630 OTUs) compared to control (1444 and 682 OTUs). Biochar addition enhanced all enzymatic activities and its correlation with bacterial was more complex than fungal community (786 and 359 connect edges). The dominant microbes comprised of Firmicutes (45.2-35.2%), Proteobacteria (14.0-17.5%), Basidiomycota (32.4-49.5%) and Ascomycota (11.3-37.5%) among all the treatments. Overall, biochar regulates the composting microenvironment by influencing the microbial diversity and associated enzymatic activities.

  • 9.
    Duan, Y M
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Yang, J F
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Guo, Y R
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Wu, X P
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Tian, Y L
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Li, H K
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Pollution control in biochar-driven clean composting: Emphasize on heavy metal passivation and gaseous emissions mitigation2021In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 420, article id 126635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present study was focus on the pollution control aspect of gaseous mitigation and heavy metal passivation as well as their associated bacterial communities driven by apple tree branch biochar (BB) during sheep manure composting. Six treatment was performed with distinct concentration of BB from 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 12.5% as T1 to T6. Compared with compost without additive, biochar-based composting recorded faster thermophilic process (4thd) and longer duration (12-14d), lower gaseous emission in terms of ammonia (5.37-10.29 g), nitrous oxide (0.12-0.47 g) and methane (4.38-30.29 g). Notably highest temperature (65.3 celcius) and active thermophilic duration (14d), minimized gaseous volatilization were detected in 10%BB composting. Aspect of non-degradability and enrichment-concentration properties of heavy metals, the total copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) were increased (from initial 12.71-17.91 to final 16.36-29.36 mg/kg and 107.39-146.58-161.48-211.91 mg/ kg). In view of available diethylene triamine pentacetic acid (DTPA) extractable form, DTPA-Cu and DTPA-Zn from 4.29 to 6.57 and 31.66-39.32 mg/kg decreased to 3.75-4.82 and 23.43-40.54 mg/kg, especially the maximized passivation rate of 46.95% and 56.27% were present in 10%BB composting. Additionally, bacterial diversity of biochar-based composting was increased (1817-2310 OTUs) than control (1686 OTUs) and dominant by Firmicutes (52.75%), Bacteroidetes (28.41%) and Actinobacteriota (13.98%). Validated 10% biochar-based composting is the optimal option for effectively control environmental pollution to obtain hygienic composting.

  • 10.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Improving the biorefinery "status" of ethanol plants with edible filamentous fungi2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kawa-Rygielska, Joanna
    et al.
    Department of Fermentation and Cereals Technology, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 51-630 Wrocław, Poland.
    Pietrzak, Witold
    Department of Fermentation and Cereals Technology, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 51-630 Wrocław, Poland.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    High-Efficiency Conversion of Bread Residues to Ethanol and Edible Biomass Using Filamentous Fungi at High Solids Loading: A Biorefinery Approach2022In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 12, no 13, article id 6405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bread residues represent a significant fraction of retail food wastes, becoming a severe environmental challenge and an economic loss for the food sector. They are, however, an attractive resource for bioconversion into value-added products. In this study, the edible filamentous fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae were employed for the production of bioethanol and high-protein biomass by cultivation on enzymatically liquefied bread-waste medium at 150 g/L solids. The fermentation of hydrolysate by N. intermedia resulted in the ethanol titer of 32.2 g/L and biomass yield of 19.2 g/L with ca. 45% protein. However, the fermentation ended with a considerable amount of residual fermentable sugars; therefore, the liquid medium after the first fermentation was distilled and fermented again by two fungal strains (N. intermedia and A. oryzae). The fermentations resulted in the production of additional ethanol and biomass. A. oryzae showed better performance in the production of biomass, while the other strain yielded more ethanol. The final products’ yield ranged 0.29–0.32 g EtOH/g and 0.20–0.22 g biomass/g bread waste depending on the strain used in the second fermentation. The study shows that valorization of bread residuals by fungi is a promising option for the production of biofuels and foodstuff within the circular bioeconomy approach. 

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  • 12.
    Li, W.
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Shi, C.
    Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Yu, Y.
    Zhejiang Water Healer Environmental Technology Co., Ltd, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Ruan, Y.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Kong, D.
    Agricultural Experiment Station, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Lv, X.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Xu, P.
    Department of Tea Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Dong, M.
    Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Interrelationships between tetracyclines and nitrogen cycling processes mediated by microorganisms: A review2021In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 319, article id 124036Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and low cost, tetracyclines (TCs) are a class of antibiotics widely used for human and veterinary medical purposes and as a growth-promoting agent for aquaculture. Interrelationships between TCs and nitrogen cycling have attracted scientific attention due to the complicated processes mediated by microorganisms. TCs negatively impact the nitrogen cycling; however, simultaneous degradation of TCs during nitrogen cycling mediated by microorganisms can be achieved. This review encapsulates the background and distribution of TCs in the environment. Additionally, the main nitrogen cycling process mediated by microorganisms were retrospectively examined. Furthermore, effects of TCs on the nitrogen cycling processes, namely nitrification, denitrification, and anammox, have been summarized. Finally, the pathway and microbial mechanism of degradation of TCs accompanied by nitrogen cycling processes were reviewed, along with the scope for prospective studies. © 2020

  • 13.
    Liu, H.
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhou, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Qin, S.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Kumar Awasth, S.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Liu, T.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Distribution of heavy metal resistant bacterial community succession in cow manure biochar amended sheep manure compost2021In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 335, article id 125282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of cow manure biochar (CMB) on the distribution of heavy metal resistant bacterial (HMRB) community succession during sheep manure (SM) composting. The experiments were conducted with six different ratio of CMB (0%(T1), 2.5%(T2), 5%(T3), 7.5%(T4), 10%(T5) and 12% (T6) on a dry weight basis) and 0% is used as control. The results showed that the most dominant phylum were Proteobacteria (40.89%-5.65%) and Firmicutes (0.16%-93.18%), and 7.5% CMB mixed with sheep manure for best results. Thus, significant correlation was noticed among the analyzed physicochemical factors, gaseous emission and bacterial phylum in used 7.5–10% CMB applied for SM composting. Overall, the application of biochar increased the diversity of the bacterial community and promoted the degradation of organic matter. In addition, 7.5–10% CMB applied treatments showed greater immobilization of HMRB community succession during SM composting.

  • 14.
    Nazir, Muhammad Tahir
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sar, Taner
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery University of Borås Borås Sweden.
    Production of filamentous fungal biomass with increased oil content using olive oil as a carbon source2022In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Vegetable oil is more difficult for microorganisms to degrade compared with carbohydrates and protein. Oil-rich waste creates serious environmental and health concerns if it remains untreated. The aim of the work reported here was to evaluate the effects on the nutritional composition of filamentous fungal biomass by growing it in pure olive oil as a carbon source.

    RESULTS

    The growth of different filamentous fungal strains (Aspergillus oryzae, Neurospora intermedia and Rhizopus oryzae) was investigated in pure olive oil. A pre-germination stage of either glucose or yeast extract was necessary for successful fungal growth in olive oil. A. oryzae showed superior performance in comparison with N. intermedia and R. oryzae in terms of biomass growth. The obtained biomass from A. oryzae and N. intermedia was analyzed for protein, fat, ash and alkali-insoluble material, where the presence of olive oil had a steering effect on biomass growth (16 g L−1 with oil versus 4 g L−1 without oil). Nutritional composition of the fungal biomass of A. oryzae contained 0.33% fat and 48% protein when cultivated in medium without olive oil supplementation, while 31% fat and 14% protein contents were observed in the presence of olive oil-containing medium. Similar trends for fat and protein contents were observed for the biomass of N. intermedia. Moreover, microscopy confirmed the presence of oil globules inside the fungal cells.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Fat composition of fungal biomass can be steered through addition of olive oil, which increases the versatility of the produced biomass for various applications, namely in feed, food and biofuel production.

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  • 15.
    Rafiee, Zeinab
    et al.
    Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Technology, Shahid Ashrafi Esfahani University, Isfahan 81799-49999, Iran.
    Jalili Tabaii, Maryam
    Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Technology, Shahid Ashrafi Esfahani University, Isfahan 81799-49999, Iran.
    Moradi, Maryam
    Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Technology, Shahid Ashrafi Esfahani University, Isfahan 81799-49999, Iran.
    Harirchi, Sharareh
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, 501 90 Borås, Sweden;Department of Biotechnology, Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, Tehran P.O. Box 3353-5111, Iran.
    Unveiling Antibacterial Potential and Physiological Characteristics of Thermophilic Bacteria Isolated from a Hot Spring in Iran2024In: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing worldwide demand for antimicrobial agents has significantly contributed to the alarming rise of antimicrobial resistance, posing a grave threat to human life. Consequently, there is a pressing need to explore uncharted environments, seeking out novel antimicrobial compounds that display exceptionally efficient capabilities. Hot springs harbor microorganisms possessing remarkable properties, rendering them an invaluable resource for uncovering groundbreaking antimicrobial compounds. In this study, thermophilic bacteria were isolated from Mahallat Hot Spring, Iran. Out of the 30 isolates examined, 3 strains exhibited the most significant antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, the supernatants of the isolated strains exhibited remarkable antibacterial activity, displaying notable resistance to temperatures as high as 75 °C for 30 min. It was determined that the two strains showed high similarity to the Bacillus genus, while strain Kh3 was classified as Saccharomonospora azurea. All three strains exhibited tolerance to NaCl. Bacillus strains demonstrated optimal growth at pH 5 and 40 °C, whereas S. azurea exhibited optimal growth at pH 9 and 45 °C. Accordingly, hot springs present promising natural reservoirs for the isolation of resilient strains possessing antibacterial properties, which can be utilized in disease treatment or within the food industry.

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  • 16.
    Sar, Taner
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Technical University, Kocaeli 41400, Türkiye.
    Akbas, Meltem Yesilcimen
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Technical University, Kocaeli 41400, Türkiye.
    Antimicrobial Activities of Olive Oil Mill Wastewater Extracts against Selected Microorganisms2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 10, article id 8179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discovering eco-friendly alternatives to synthetic chemicals has become an increasingly popular area of research. Natural products are now in the spotlight for their potential use as replacements for synthetic chemicals. To maximize the benefits of these natural products, it is important to use efficient extraction methods, especially from agroindustrial waste. Olive oil mill wastewater (OOMW) is a byproduct of the olive oil production process and is considered a pollutant; however, OOMW contains a wide range of phenolic compounds that have proven antimicrobial properties. This study investigates the extraction of these compounds from OOMW, with the aim of determining their potential antimicrobial activities against several bacterial strains and fungi, including Bacillus spizizenii, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella aerogenes, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. The OOMW extracts (OEs) were prepared by using three different solvents: ethyl acetate, ethanol, and methanol. The highest total phenolic contents (4.03 g, GAE/L) and the strongest antibacterial activity were obtained with methanol extraction. All OEs showed no antifungal activity against C. albicans. OEs, particularly methanol extracts of OOMW, can be used as bioactive substances in various industries as nutraceuticals and food ingredients, respectively.

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  • 17.
    Sharma, Shagun
    et al.
    Jaypee University of Information Technology, India.
    Singh, Astha
    Jaypee University of Information Technology, India.
    Sharma, Swati
    Jaypee University of Information Technology, India.
    Kant, Anil
    Jaypee University of Information Technology, India.
    Sevda, Surajbhan
    National Institute of Technology Warangal, India.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Garlapati, Vijay Kumar
    Jaypee University of Information Technology, India.
    Functional foods as a formulation ingredients in beverages: technological advancements and constraints2021In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 11055-11075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a consequence of expanded science and technical research, the market perception of consumers has shifted from standard traditional to valuable foods, which are furthermore nutritional as well as healthier in today’s world. This food concept, precisely referred to as functional, focuses on including probiotics, which enhance immune system activity, cognitive response, and overall health. This review primarily focuses on functional foods as functional additives in beverages and other food items that can regulate the human immune system and avert any possibility of contracting the infection. Many safety concerns must be resolved during their administration. Functional foods must have an adequate amount of specific probiotic strain(s) during their use and storage, as good viability is needed for optimum functionality of the probiotic. Thus, when developing novel functional food-based formulations, choosing a strain with strong technological properties is crucial. The present review focused on probiotics as an active ingredient in different beverage formulations and the exerting mechanism of action and fate of probiotics in the human body. Moreover, a comprehensive overview of the regulative and safety issues of probiotics-based foods and beverages formulations. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

  • 18.
    Song, Yapeng
    et al.
    College of Engineering, Biomass Engineering Center, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China;Sanya Institute of China Agriculural University, Sanya 572025, China.
    Qiao, Wei
    College of Engineering, Biomass Engineering Center, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China;Sanya Institute of China Agriculural University, Sanya 572025, China.
    Westerholm, Maria
    Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala BioCenter, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Huang, Guangqun
    College of Engineering, Biomass Engineering Center, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, 501 90 Borås, Sweden.
    Dong, Renjie
    College of Engineering, Biomass Engineering Center, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China.
    Microbiological and Technological Insights on Anaerobic Digestion of Animal Manure: A Review2023In: Fermentation, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 436Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure results in the production of renewable energy (biogas) and nutrient-rich biofertilizer. A further benefit of the technology is decreased greenhouse gas emissions that otherwise occur during manure storage. Since animal manure makes anaerobic digestion cost-efficient and further advance the technology for higher methane yields, it is of utmost importance to find strategies to improve bottlenecks such as the degradation of lignocellulose, e.g., in cattle manure, or to circumvent microbial inhibition by ammonia caused by the degradation of nitrogen compounds in, e.g., chicken, duck, or swine manure. This review summarizes the characteristics of different animal manures and provides insight into the underlying microbial mechanisms causing challenging problems with the anaerobic digestion process. A particular focus is put upon the retention time and organic loading rate in high-ammonia processes, which should be designed and optimized to support the microorganisms that tolerate high ammonia conditions, such as the syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria and the hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Furthermore, operating managements used to stabilize and increase the methane yield of animal manure, including supporting materials, the addition of trace elements, or the incorporation of ammonia removal technologies, are summarized. The review is finalized with a discussion of the research needed to outline conceivable operational methods for the anaerobic digestion process of animal manure to circumvent process instability and improve the process performance. 

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  • 19.
    Svensson, Sofie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Oliveira, A. O.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, K. H.
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heinmaa, I.
    National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia.
    Root, A.
    MagSol, Tuhkanummenkuja 2, 00970 Helsinki, Finland.
    Kondori, N.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Institution of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 46 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hakkarainen, M.
    Department of Fibre and Polymer Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Turning food waste to antibacterial and biocompatible fungal chitin/chitosan monofilaments2022In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 209, p. 618-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, cell wall of a zygomycete fungus, Rhizopus delemar, grown on bread waste was wet spun into monofilaments. Using the whole cell wall material omits the common chitosan isolation and purification steps and leads to higher material utilization. The fungal cell wall contained 36.9% and 19.7% chitosan and chitin, respectively. Solid state NMR of the fungal cell wall material confirmed the presence of chitosan, chitin, and other carbohydrates. Hydrogels were prepared by ultrafine grinding of the cell wall, followed by addition of lactic acid to protonate the amino groups of chitosan, and subsequently wet spun into monofilaments. The monofilament inhibited the growth of Bacillus megaterium (Gram+ bacterium) and Escherichia coli (Gram- bacterium) significantly (92.2% and 99.7% respectively). Cytotoxicity was evaluated using an in vitro assay with human dermal fibroblasts, indicating no toxic inducement from exposure of the monofilaments. The antimicrobial and biocompatible fungal monofilaments, open new avenues for sustainable biomedical textiles from abundant food waste. © 2022 The Authors

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  • 20.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Edebo, L.
    Exploring zygomycetes fungi for industrial applications2009In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 83-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Ucm, R
    et al.
    Department of Biotechnology, Engineering School of Lorena (EEL), University of São Paulo (USP), Lorena 12602-810, Brazil.
    Aem, M
    Department of Biotechnology, Engineering School of Lorena (EEL), University of São Paulo (USP), Lorena 12602-810, Brazil.
    Lhb, Z
    Department of Biotechnology, Engineering School of Lorena (EEL), University of São Paulo (USP), Lorena 12602-810, Brazil.
    Kumar, V
    School of Water, Energy and Environment, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL, UK.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Garlapati, V K
    Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Information Technology, Waknaghat 173234, India.
    Chandel, A K
    Department of Biotechnology, Engineering School of Lorena (EEL), University of São Paulo (USP), Lorena 12602-810, Brazil.
    Comprehensive review on biotechnological production of hyaluronic acid: status, innovation, market and applications2022In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 9645-9661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing, existing demand for low-cost and high-quality hyaluronic acid (HA) needs an outlook of different possible production strategies from renewable resources with the reduced possibility of cross-infections. Recently, the possibility of producing HA from harmless microorganisms appeared, which offers the opportunity to make HA more economical, without raw material limitations, and environmentally friendly. HA production is mainly reported with Lancefield Streptococci A and C, particularly from S. equi and S. zooepidemicus. Various modes of fermentation such as batch, repeated batch, fed-batch, and continuous culture have been investigated to optimize HA production, particularly from S. zooepidemicus, obtaining a HA yield of 2.5 g L-1 - 7.0 g L-1. Among the different utilized DSP approaches of HA production, recovery with cold ethanol (4 degrees C) and cetylpyridinium chloride is the ideal strategy for lab-scale HA production. On the industrial scale, besides using isopropanol, filtration (0.22 um), ultrafiltration (100 kDa), and activated carbon absorption are employed to obtain HA of low molecular weight and additional ultrafiltration to purify HA of higher MW. Even though mature technologies have already been developed for the industrial production of HA, the projections of increased sales volume and the expansion of application possibilities require new processes to obtain HA with higher productivity, purity, and specific molecular weights. In this review, we have put forth the progress of HA technological research by discussing the microbial biosynthetic aspects, fermentation and downstream strategies, industrial-scale scenarios of HA, and the prospects of HA production to meet the current and ongoing market demands.

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  • 22.
    Westman, Johan O.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Together we are strong! Second generation bioethanol production by flocculating and encapsulated yeast2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Westman, Johan O.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Franzén, Carl Johan
    Inhibitor tolerance and flocculation: Characterization of a yeast strain suitable for 2nd generation bioethanol production2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Robust second generation bioethanol processes require microorganisms able to obtain high yields and production rates while fermenting inhibiting hydrolysates. However, tolerance towards inhibitors like, carboxylic acids, furan aldehydes and phenolic compounds, is still an issue and the factors contributing to improved tolerance are not well known. In this study, the constitutively flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CCUG 53310, with good ability to ferment toxic hydrolysates, was compared with S. cerevisiae CBS 8066 in order to characterize the mechanisms of flocculation and the fermentative performance in different inhibitory media. The flocculation of CCUG 53310 depended on cell wall proteins and was partly inhibited by mannose. The flocculating cells also exhibited a significantly higher hydrophobicity than the cells of the non-flocculating strain CBS 8066, which might contribute to the flocculation. The flocculating strain was more tolerant to carboxylic acids and furan aldehydes, but more sensitive to phenolic compounds. Surprisingly, the expression increase of YAP1, ATR1 and FLR1, known to confer resistance against lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, upon addition of various inhibitors to the fermentation medium, was less in CCUG 53310 than in CBS 8066 in most cases. This indicates that the flocculating strain experienced the cultivation conditions as less stressful. The flocculation in itself is a likely cause of this by creating subinhibitory local levels of inhibitors for most cells, allowing the cells in flocs to experience a lower collective stress level.

  • 24.
    Zhou, Y W
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Awasthi, S K
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Liu, T
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Verma, S
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Zhang, Z Q
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Pandey, A
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow 226 001, India.
    Varjani, S
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar 382010, Gujarat, India.
    Li, R H
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Patterns of heavy metal resistant bacterial community succession influenced by biochar amendment during poultry manure composting2021In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 420, article id 126562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the heavy metal resistant bacteria (HMRB) community succession and bacterial activity in poultry manure (PM) composting. Five different concentration of chicken manure biochar (CMB) at 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, and 10% on a dry weight basis was applied with initial feedstock (poultry manure + wheat straw) and indicated with T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5. In addition, high-throughput sequencing, principal coordinate analysis, and correlation analysis were used to analyze the evolution of HMRB communities during composting. The study indicated that crucial phyla were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The bacterial diversity in the CMB amendment treatment was higher than in the control treatment, and T4 treatment has the highest among all CMB applied treatments. Moreover, results from CCA indicated that T4 and T5 treatments quickly enters the high-temperature period which is maintained for 5 days, and is significantly positively correlated with Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. These findings offer insight into potential strategies to understand the succession of HMRBs during PM reuse. Overall, the above results show the addition of 6% biochar (T4) was potentially beneficial to enrich the abundance of bacterial community to improve composting environment quality and composting efficiency. In addition, effective to immobilized the heavy metals and HMRB in the end product.

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