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  • 1. Abarenkov, Kessy
    et al.
    Adams, Rachel I.
    Irinyi, Laszlo
    Agan, Ahto
    Ambrosio, Elia
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan
    Bok, Gunilla
    Cangren, Patrik
    Coimbra, Victor
    Coleine, Claudia
    Gustafsson, Claes
    He, Jinhong
    Hofmann, Tobias
    Kristiansson, Erik
    Larsson, Ellen
    Larsson, Tomas
    Liu, Yingkui
    Martinsson, Svante
    Meyer, Wieland
    Panova, Marina
    Pombubpa, Nuttapon
    Ritter, Camila
    Ryberg, Martin
    Svantesson, Sten
    Scharn, Ruud
    Svensson, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Topel, Mats
    Unterseher, Martin
    Visagie, Cobus
    Wurzbacher, Christian
    Taylor, Andy F. S.
    Koljalg, Urmas
    Schriml, Lynn
    Nilsson, R. Henrik
    Annotating public fungal ITS sequences from the built environment according to the MIxS-Built Environment standard - a report from a May 23-24, 2016 workshop (Gothenburg, Sweden)2016In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 16, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent molecular studies have identified substantial fungal diversity in indoor environments. Fungi and fungal particles have been linked to a range of potentially unwanted effects in the built environment, including asthma, decay of building materials, and food spoilage. The study of the built mycobiome is hampered by a number of constraints, one of which is the poor state of the metadata annotation of fungal DNA sequences from the built environment in public databases. In order to enable precise interrogation of such data - for example, "retrieve all fungal sequences recovered from bathrooms" - a workshop was organized at the University of Gothenburg (May 23-24, 2016) to annotate public fungal barcode (ITS) sequences according to the MIxS-Built Environment annotation standard (http:// gensc.org/ mixs/). The 36 participants assembled a total of 45,488 data points from the published literature, including the addition of 8,430 instances of countries of collection from a total of 83 countries, 5,801 instances of building types, and 3,876 instances of surface-air contaminants. The results were implemented in the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi (http://unite.ut.ee) and were shared with other online resources. Data obtained from human/animal pathogenic fungi will furthermore be verified on culture based metadata for subsequent inclusion in the ISHAM-ITS database (http:// its. mycologylab.org).

  • 2. Adrian-Kalchhauser, I
    et al.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Kutschera, VE
    Alm Rosenblad, M
    Pippel, M
    Winkler, S
    Schloissnig, S
    Blomberg, A
    Burkhardt-Holm, P
    Pomatoschistus minutus voucher NRM:NRM69326 mitochondrion, complete genome: GenBank: MW0928272020Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complete Pomatoschistus minutus mitochondrion genome. The voucher NRM:NRM69326 is stored at The Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden. The Genbank Accession number of the annotated sequence MW092827.

  • 3. Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene
    et al.
    Svensson, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Medicinaregatan 18A, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kutschera, Verena E.
    Rosenblad, Magnus Alm
    Pippel, Martin
    Winkler, Sylke
    Schloissnig, Siegfried
    Blomberg, Anders
    Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia
    The mitochondrial genome sequences of the round goby and the sand goby reveal patterns of recent evolution in gobiid fish2017In: BMC Genomics, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vertebrate mitochondrial genomes are optimized for fast replication and low cost of RNA expression. Accordingly, they are devoid of introns, are transcribed as polycistrons and contain very little intergenic sequences. Usually, vertebrate mitochondrial genomes measure between 16.5 and 17 kilobases ( kb). Results: During genome sequencing projects for two novel vertebrate models, the invasive round goby and the sand goby, we found that the sand goby genome is exceptionally small (16.4 kb), while the mitochondrial genome of the round goby is much larger than expected for a vertebrate. It is 19 kb in size and is thus one of the largest fish and even vertebrate mitochondrial genomes known to date. The expansion is attributable to a sequence insertion downstream of the putative transcriptional start site. This insertion carries traces of repeats from the control region, but is mostly novel. To get more information about this phenomenon, we gathered all available mitochondrial genomes of Gobiidae and of nine gobioid species, performed phylogenetic analyses, analysed gene arrangements, and compared gobiid mitochondrial genome sizes, ecological information and other species characteristics with respect to the mitochondrial phylogeny. This allowed us amongst others to identify a unique arrangement of tRNAs among Ponto-Caspian gobies. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the round goby mitochondrial genome may contain novel features. Since mitochondrial genome organisation is tightly linked to energy metabolism, these features may be linked to its invasion success. Also, the unique tRNA arrangement among Ponto- Caspian gobies may be helpful in studying the evolution of this highly adaptive and invasive species group. Finally, we find that the phylogeny of gobiids can be further refined by the use of longer stretches of linked DNA sequence.

  • 4.
    Akbas, Meltem Yesilcimen
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Institute of Technology, Gebze, Turkey.
    Sar, Taner
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ozcelik, Busra
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Institute of Technology, Gebze, Turkey.
    Improved ethanol production from cheese whey, whey powder, and sugar beet molasses by “Vitreoscilla hemoglobin expressing” Escherichia coli2014In: Bioscience, biotechnology and biochemistry, ISSN 0916-8451, E-ISSN 1347-6947, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 687-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigated the improvement of ethanol production by engineered ethanologenic Escherichia coli to express the hemoglobin from the bacterium Vitreoscilla (VHb). Ethanologenic E. coli strain FBR5 and FBR5 transformed with the VHb gene in two constructs (strains TS3 and TS4) were grown in cheese whey (CW) medium at small and large scales, at both high and low aeration, or with whey powder (WP) or sugar beet molasses hydrolysate (SBMH) media at large scale and low aeration. Culture pH, cell growth, VHb levels, and ethanol production were evaluated after 48 h. VHb expression in TS3 and TS4 enhanced their ethanol production in CW (21–419%), in WP (17–362%), or in SBMH (48–118%) media. This work extends the findings that “VHb technology” may be useful for improving the production of ethanol from waste and byproducts of various sources. 

  • 5.
    Akinbomi, Julius
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sanni, Adebayo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development and dissemination strategies for accelerating biogas production in Nigeria2014In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 5707-5737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the worsening energy crisis of unreliable electricity and unaffordable petroleum products coupled with the increase number of poverty-stricken people in Nigeria, the populace is desperately in need of cheap alternative energy supplies that will replace or complement the existing energy sources. Previous efforts by the government in tackling the challenge by citizenship sensitization of the need for introduction of biofuel into the country’s energy mix have not yielded the expected results because of a lack of sustained government effort. In light of the shortcomings, this study assesses the current potential of available biomass feedstock for biogas production in Nigeria, and further proposes appropriate biogas plants, depending on feedstock type and quantity, for the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. Besides, the study proposes government-driven biogas development systems that could be effectively used to harness, using biogas technology, the estimated 270 TWh of potential electrical energy from 181 million tonnes of available biomass, in the advancement of electricity generation and consequent improvement of welfare in Nigeria.

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  • 6.
    Akintunde, Moyinoluwa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Microbiology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
    Adebayo-Tayo, B C
    Department of Microbiology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
    Ishola, M M
    Department of Energy and Environment, Göteborg Energi, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sárvári Horváth, Ilona
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bacterial Cellulose Production from agricultural Residues by two Komagataeibacter sp. Strains2022In: Bioengineered, ISSN 2165-5979, E-ISSN 2165-5987, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 10010-10025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural residues are constantly increasing with increased farming processes, and improper disposal is detrimental to the environment. Majority of these waste residues are rich in lignocellulose, which makes them suitable substrate for bacterial fermentation in the production of valueadded products. In this study, bacterial cellulose (BC), a purer and better form of cellulose, was produced by two Komagataeibacter sp. isolated from rotten banana and kombucha drink using corncob (CC) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) enzymatic hydrolyzate, under different fermentation conditions, that is, static, continuous, and intermittent agitation. The physicochemical and mechanical properties of the BC films were then investigated by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetry analysis, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), and Dynamic mechanical analysis. Agitation gave a higher BC yield, with Komagataeibacter sp. CCUG73629 producing BC from CC with a dry weight of 1.6 g/L and 1.4 g/L under continuous and intermittent agitation, respectively, compared with that of 0.9 g/L in HS medium. While BC yield of dry weight up to 1.2 g/L was obtained from SCB by Komagataeibacter sp. CCUG73630 under continuous agitation compared to that of 0.3 g/L in HS medium. FTIR analysis showed BC bands associated with cellulose I, with high thermal stability. The FE-SEM analysis showed that BC fibers were highly ordered and densely packed. Although the BC produced by both strains showed similar physicochemical and morphological properties, the BC produced by the Komagataeibacter sp. CCUG73630 in CC under intermittent agitation had the best modulus of elasticity, 10.8 GPa and tensile strength, 70.9 MPa. [GRAPHICS]

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  • 7.
    Akpinar, Ilgin
    et al.
    Istanbul University.
    Unal, Muammer
    Istanbul University.
    Sar, Taner
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Potential antifungal effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of different sizes against phytopathogenic Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL) strains2021In: SN Applied Sciences, ISSN 2523-3963, E-ISSN 2523-3971, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 506-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fusarium species are the primary fungal pathogen affecting agricultural foodstuffs both in crop yield and economic loss. Due to these problems, control of phytopathogenic fungi has become one of the critical problems around the World. Nanotechnology is a new technology with potential in many fields, including agriculture. This study focused on determining potential effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with different nanosizes (3, 5, 8 and 10 nm) and at different concentrations (12.5–100 ppm) against phytopathogenic Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL) strains. The maximum antifungal activity was achieved by decreasing nanosize and increasing concentration of AgNPs. Mycelium growth abilities were decreased about 50%, 75% and 90% by AgNPs treatment with 3 nm sizes at 25 ppm, 37.5 ppm and 50 ppm concentrations, respectively. The productivity of fungal biomass in the liquid growth media was found to be too limited at the 25–37.5 ppm of AgNPs concentrations with all sizes. In addition, both septation number and dimensions of micro- and macroconidia were found to be gradually decreased with the application of silver nanoparticles. This work showed that the low concentration of AgNPs could be used as potential antifungal agents and applied for control of phytopathogens.

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  • 8.
    Andersson, Magdalena
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet.
    Förundrans roll för elevers meningsskapande om evolutionära processer2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Filosofer såväl som forskare har länge hävdat att förundran är en nyckel till elevers intresse och engagemang i skolans NO-undervisning. Trots detta finns det i nuläget mycket få empiriska studier som beskriver lärares arbete med att ge plats för förundran i skolans NO-undervisning.

    Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka hur elevers förundran kan studeras i klassrumssituationer samt om, och hur, elevers uttryck för förundran kan kopplas till deras meningsskapande om ett planerat lärandemål.

    I studien har forskare och en NO-lärare (årskurs 7) samarbetat för att utforma evolutionsundervisning med plats för elevers förundran. Följande forskningsfrågor fokuseras:

    1. På vilka sätt kan lärare ge plats för förundran i samband med evolutionsundervisning?
    2. Hur påverkar undervisning, med plats för förundran, elevers möjligheter för meningsskapande om evolutionära processer och begrepp kopplade till dessa?

    Empirin består av 45 individuella skriftliga elevreflektioner och transkriberade ljudinspelningar från 6 parvisa elevintervjuer. Elevernas reflektioner analyserades i två steg. Steg ett fokuserade på hur eleverna uttryckte förundran i relation till frågan Vad brukar du förundras över? Steg två på vad de förundrats över i evolutionsundervisningen. Elevintervjuerna analyserades med fokus på elevernas meningsskapande om evolutionära processer.

    Resultaten visar att eleverna ger uttryck för förundran kopplat till variation, mångfald, evolutionära tidsaspekter och samspel mellan organismer och livsmiljö. Elevernas förundran skiljer sig kvalitativt inom ett spänningsfält mellan nyfikenhetsbaserad förundran och kontemplativ förundran. Samtidigt visar elevintervjuerna att eleverna fortfarande, efter sex veckor av undervisning, kämpar med att integrera vetenskapliga begrepp från evolutionsteorin med sitt eget meningsskapande om processerna.

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  • 9.
    Andersson, Marica
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Swartz, Terese
    Universeum, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Manera, Jack L.
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Bertram, Michael G.
    School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Increased noise levels cause behavioural and distributional changes in Atlantic cod and saithe in a large public aquarium—A case study2023In: Aquaculture, Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 2693-8847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Investigating the effects of underwater noise on aquatic animals is a research field that is receiving rapidly increasing attention. Despite this, surprisingly few studies have addressed the potential impacts of noise in a marine animal husbandry setting. In this regard, the behaviour of fish in public aquariums can be used as an indicator of well-being, and noise is known to cause behavioural changes. This case study investigates the behaviour of cod (Gadus morhua) and saithe (Pollachius virens) in a large public aquarium when exposed to increased noise levels originating from an aquarium renovation carried out by construction divers. Swimming behaviour, group formation and vertical distribution, along with yawning and scratching frequencies of the fish, were analysed from video recordings made before, during and after the exposure to increased noise levels. The same parameters were also analysed to evaluate potential effects of the presence of divers when not making renovation noise, compared to fish behaviour prior to the renovation. There was a slight change in the depth distribution of both species and a decrease in the number of scratches in cod due to the presence of divers that were not making renovation noise. In the presence of construction noises in the tank, however, both cod and saithe showed a wider array of behavioural changes, including increased swimming speed, changes in depth distribution and increased yawning frequencies. The results from this case study demonstrate that an underwater renovation with increased noise levels impacts fish behaviour and suggests that underwater noise should be considered during the management of aquatic environments, including public aquaria.

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  • 10.
    Asnicar, Davide
    et al.
    University of Padova, Italy; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ašmonaitė, Giedrė
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Birgersson, Lina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Matematikens didaktik.
    Sturve, Joachim
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sand Goby: An Ecologically Relevant Species for Behavioural Ecotoxicology2018In: Fishes, E-ISSN 2410-3888, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Locomotion-based behavioural endpoints have been suggested as suitable sublethal endpoints for human and environmental hazard assessment, as well as for biomonitoring applications. Larval stages of the sand goby (Pomatoschistus minutus) possess a number of attractive qualities for experimental testing that make it a promising species in behavioural ecotoxicology. Here, we present a study aimed at developing a toolkit for using the sand goby as novel species for ecotoxicological studies and using locomotion as an alternative endpoint in toxicity testing. Exposure to three contaminants (copper (Cu), di-butyl phthalate (DBP) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was tested in the early life stages of the sand goby and the locomotion patterns of the larvae were quantified using an automatic tracking system. In a photo-motor test, sand goby larvae displayed substantially higher activity in light than in dark cycles. Furthermore, all tested compounds exerted behavioural alterations, such as hypo- and hyperactivity. Our experimental results show that sand goby larvae produce robust and quantifiable locomotive responses, which could be used within an ecotoxicological context for assessing the behavioural toxicity of environmental pollutants, with particular relevance in the Nordic region. This study thus suggests that sand goby larvae have potential as an environmentally relevant species for behavioural ecotoxicology, and as such offer an alternative to standard model species.

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  • 11.
    Awasthi, S. K.
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Duan, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Liu, T.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Pandey, A.
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow 226 001, India.
    Varjani, S.
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar - 382010, Gujarat, India.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Can biochar regulate the fate of heavy metals (Cu and Zn) resistant bacteria community during the poultry manure composting?2021In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 406, article id 124593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the influence of coconut shell biochar addition (CSB) on heavy metals (Cu and Zn) resistance bacterial fate and there correlation with physicochemical parameters were evaluated during poultry manure composting. High-throughput sequencing was carried out on five treatments, namely T1−T5, where T2 to T5 were supplemented with 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% CSB, while T1 was used as control for the comparison. The results of HMRB indicated that the relative abundance of major potential bacterial host altered were Firmicutes (52.88–14.32%), Actinobacteria (35.20–4.99%), Bacteroidetes (0.05–15.07%) and Proteobacteria (0.01–20.28%) with elevated biochar concentration (0%−10%). Beta and alpha diversity as well as network analysis illustrated composting micro-environmental ecology with exogenous additive biochar to remarkably affect the dominant resistant bacterial community distribution by adjusting the interacting between driving environmental parameters with potential host bacterial in composting. Ultimately, the amendment of 7.5% CSB into poultry manure composting was able to significantly reduce the HMRB abundance, improve the composting efficiency and end product quality. 

  • 12.
    Awasthi, S. K.
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Duan, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Liu, T.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Zhou, Y.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Qin, S.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Liu, H.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Varjani, S.
    Gujarat Pollution Control Board, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 382010, India.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province, 712100, China.
    Pandey, A.
    Centre for Innovation and Translational Research, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, 226 001, India.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sequential presence of heavy metal resistant fungal communities influenced by biochar amendment in the poultry manure composting process2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 291, article id 125947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigated the influence of coconut shell biochar (CSB) on heavy metal resistance fungi (HMRF) during poultry manure (PM) composting by 18 S rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Amplicon Sequencing analysis. Five different concentrations of CSB (2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% dry weights basis) were applied with a mixture of PM and wheat straw (5:1 ratio dry weight basis) and without CSB (CK) was used as control. The results showed that sequence number rose along with increasing CSB concentration but total relative abundance (RA) of HMRF decreased 56.33%, 74.65% in T4 and T5, respectively. However, greater RA of HMRF was found in T1 or without biochar applied treatment. The phylum of Basidiomycota was the dominant fungal community accounting for 61.14%, 6.16%, 32.18%, 74.65%, and 73.73% from T1 to T5 of the total fungi abundance, with wide presence of the Wallemiomycetes and Eurotiomycetes classes. The Wallemia and Aspergillus were the richest genus and species. Wallemia_sebi, Altemaria_alternata and Aspergillus_amoenus were detected having greater abundance among all treatments. Besides this, the network correlation pattern confirmed that the relative greater percentage of correlation among dominant HMRF community with bio-available HM and other physicochemical factors increased with the addition of biochar. There was reasonable infer that the biochar amendment in composting could constitute favorable habitat for an active fungal population. 

  • 13.
    Balaban, Merve
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Technical University, Gebze-Kocaeli, 41400 Turkey.
    Koc, Cansel
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Technical University, Gebze-Kocaeli, 41400 Turkey.
    Sar, Taner
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem
    Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Gebze Technical University, Gebze-Kocaeli, 41400 Turkey.
    Antibiofilm effects of pomegranate peel extracts against B. cereusB. subtilis and E. faecalis2021In: International journal of food science & technology, ISSN 0950-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2621, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 4915-4924, article id 15221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extracts (PPLs) prepared by 10g of pomegranate peels (PPL10) and 100 mL of different solvents (ethanol, methanol, and their acid combinations, and water) were investigated as sources of bioactive compounds against food related bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts were measured by using agar well diffusion assay. The acid-treated extracts exhibited the highest antimicrobial activities (31-34 mm). The biofilm formations were assessed by using a microplate reader (570 nm) after crystal violet staining. The prevention and removal of bacterial biofilms were also evaluated by using extracts prepared by 5g of initial pomegranate peel (PPL5) with the different solvents or 200 ppm chlorine solution. All PPL5 and PPL10 extracts diluted at different ratios inhibited and removed biofilms and the highest antibiofilm effects were up to 80% by acid-treated extracts. In addition, PPL5s and PPL10s were as effective as or more effective than chlorine for the prevention of biofilms. Therefore, from an economical perspective the PPL5s could represent promising candidates as natural antibiofilm agents for food industry.  

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  • 14.
    Bergengren, Jakob
    et al.
    Länsstyrelsen i Jönköping.
    Svensson, Jan-Erik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    von Proschwitz, Ted
    Naturhistoriska museet, Göteborg.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet.
    A recent Dreissena invasion in an old canal system in northern Europe2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Göta Canal was opened in 1832 and connects the Baltic and the Atlantic Sea via the large lakes Vänern and Vättern in south Sweden. Originally used for commercial transport, the canal is today one of the most popular tourist attractions in Sweden with canal cruises, pleasure boating and canoeing. Inventories in 2013 showed that Dreissena mussels recently have invaded lakes, streams and canals in the Motala River drainage basin, i.e. the eastern part of the Göta Canal. According to interviews with local people the mussels may have been there since 2012. During the late summer in 2013 and in 2014 we monitored mussels by scuba diving and we sampled planktonic larval populations in locks and the canal. Dreissena has not dispersed to the western part of the canal system, i.e. west of lake Vättern, where most lakes are oligotrophic with low Ca- andMg-levels. In the eastern part, where several lakes are eutrophic and Ca- and Mg-levels higher, populations have increased very fast. The inventories showed local densities of 10 000 adults m-2 in some eutrophic lakes and larval densities of up to 70 individuals L-1 in the canal water. In Europe, the large range expansion of Dreissena occurred during the late 19th and early 20th century. Why have they dispersed so late into the Göta Canal, i.e. some 170 years after the canal was constructed and some 80 years after they had dispersed to other lakes in Swedennorth of Göta Canal? We can not dismiss dispersal as a a limiting factor but given the historically sustained boat traffic in the region it seems likely that ecological factors may have been important. Freshwaters in Scandinavia are usually low in Ca and Mg and many lakes are characterized by oligotrophic conditions poor in food for filter-feeding Dreissena. In the Göta Canal, changes in biological factors affecting relationships between Dreissena and the regional biota needs to be studied, however. Although we can not explain the delayed invasion we conclude that Dreissena is now established in one of the largest canal system in northern Europe.

  • 15.
    Bilal, Muhammad
    et al.
    Huaiyin Institute of Technology, China.
    Qamar, Sarmad Ahmad
    East China University of Science and Technology, China.
    Yadav, Vivek
    Northwest A&F University, China.
    Cheng, Hairong
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China.
    Khan, Mujeeb
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Adil, Syed Farooq
    King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Iqbal, Hafiz M. N.
    School of Engineering and Sciences, Mexico.
    Exploring the potential of ligninolytic armory for lignin valorization: A way forward for sustainable and cleaner production2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 326, article id 129420Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin is a key structural constituent of lignocellulosic biomasses that have substantial untapped potential to substitute environmentally unfriendly and non-renewable fossil-based resources. Unfortunately, multifaceted composition, heterogeneity, and structural recalcitrance of the lignin are the biggest technical challenges for its effective deconstruction and bioconversions to an array of bio-based products, e.g., specialty chemicals and biomaterials. Physicochemical methods for lignin depolymerization require strict reaction conditions, high en-ergy to execute processes, and environmental apprehensions. In contrast, biological platforms harnessing the catalytic potentiality of microorganisms and their robust enzymatic armory are thought to be efficient means for lignin decomposition. Enzymes, derived from natural origin, are highly proficient and eco-friendly biocatalysts that manifest high selectivity, require milder reaction conditions, and reduce resource requirements. The utili-zation of enzymes for lignin conversion and pre-treatment of biomass for detergent, textile, pulp and papers, and food sector applications has been investigated for decades. Herein, we reviewed lignin bioconversion by bio-logical means, focusing on ligninolytic enzyme-assisted pretreatment approaches. In the first half, we outlined the lignin as a multipurpose raw feedstock, fixation of CO2 to lignin biosynthesis and tailored lignin approach, and sources and types of lignin. The bio-based pre-treatment approaches for lignin depolymerization, including white-rot fungi, brown-rot fungi, bacteria, and ligninolytic enzymes, i.e., manganese peroxidase (MnP) lignin peroxidase (LiP), Laccase (Lac), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyP) are thor-oughly vetted in the second half.

  • 16.
    Biswas, Tuser
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Yu, Junchun
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Effective Pretreatment Routes of Polyethylene Terephthalate Fabric for Digital Inkjet Printing of Enzyme2021In: Materials Science & Engineering: B. Solid-state Materials for Advanced Technology, ISSN 0921-5107, E-ISSN 1873-4944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymes immobilized on synthetic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) textile surface by resource‐efficient inkjet printing technology can promote developments for various novel applications. Synthetic fabrics often require adequate pretreatments to facilitate such printing process. This work discusses PET–woven fabric pretreatment routes to improve wettability by alkaline, enzymatic, and plasma processes for effective printing of lysozyme using an industrial piezoelectric printhead. Results indicate that all pretreated samples contain a similar amount of enzymes upon printing. Plasma treated fabrics show relatively more hydrophilic surface characteristics, better protein binding stability, and lower retained activity. Alkali and cutinase‐treated samples possess relatively higher activity due to the greater amount of enzyme desorption to substrate solution. Depending on respective enzyme‐binding stability, a combination of a well-pretreated surface and inkjet as preferential placement technology, the approach of this study can be used as a facile enzyme immobilization method for suitable applications, for example, controlled‐release and bio‐sensing.

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  • 17.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Amorim, M. Clara
    Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ISPA-Instituto Universitário, Rua Jardim do Tabaco, 34, 1149-041, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Svensson, Ola
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Continuous and intermittent noise has a negative impact on reproductive success and early life survival in marine fish2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic underwater noise is a global pollutant of increasing concern and its effect on marine organisms is largely unknown. Importantly, direct assessments of fitness consequences are lacking especially in fish. The effect of noise pattern with continuous or intermittent noise are poorly understood and the few existing studies investigating the effect highlight contradictory responses in fish. Working in aquaria, we experimentally tested the impact of broadband noise exposure (similar frequency range as anthropogenic boat noise; added either continuously or intermittently) on the behaviour and reproductive success, assessed by the number of obtained eggs, of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps), a vocal fish with exclusive paternal care.  The continuous noise treatment had the most detrimental effect by reducing spawning probability and females took longer to spawn under continuous noise. Males exposed to continuous noise got significantly fewer egg clutches (4 compared to 11 and 15 in the intermittent noise and silence treatments).  Clutch area did not differ among treatments but clutches in the intermittent and continuous noise treatment had significantly more eggs per cm2. In addition, eggs in the control tanks hatched earlier than in the intermittent and noisy treatments. Larvae reared in continuous noise treatment were larger and had a smaller yolk-sac at hatching than larvae in the intermittent noise treatment and the control. Taken together, we show that noise, particularly a continuous noise exposure, negatively affects reproductive success and early life survival in fish larvae.

  • 18.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dekhla, Isabelle
    University of Gothenburg.
    Schöld, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg.
    Andersson, Mathias H.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency.
    Svensson, Ola
    Södertörns högskola, Matematikens didaktik.
    Amorim, M Clara P
    ISPA-Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal; Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Continuous but not intermittent noise has a negative impact on mating success in a marine fish with paternal care2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 5494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic underwater noise is a global pollutant of increasing concern but its impact on reproduction in fish is largely unknown. Hence, a better understanding of its consequences for this important link to fitness is crucial. Working in aquaria, we experimentally tested the impact of broadband noise exposure (added either continuously or intermittently), compared to a control, on the behaviour and reproductive success of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps), a vocal fish with exclusive paternal care. Compared to the intermittent noise and control treatments, the continuous noise treatment increased latency to female nest inspection and spawning and decreased spawning probability. In contrast, many other female and male pre-spawning behaviours, and female ventilation rate (proxies for stress levels) did not differ among treatments. Therefore, it is likely that female spawning decisions were delayed by a reduced ability to assess male acoustic signals, rather than due to stress per se and that the silent periods in the intermittent noise treatment provided a respite where the females could assess the males. Taken together, we show that noise (of similar frequency range as anthropogenic boat noise) negatively affects reproductive success, particularly under a continuous noise exposure.

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  • 19. Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Mueck, Isabel
    Heubel, Katja
    Svensson, Ola
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, Gothenburg, SE-405 30, Sweden.
    Acoustic and visual courtship traits in two sympatric marine Gobiidae species - Pomatoschistus microps and Pomatoschistus minutus2016In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 99, no 12, p. 999-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Divergence in courtship traits across species can evolve as adaptations to different environments, and also through avoidance of reproductive interference and character displacement. Differences may also be explained by phylogenetic relationships. We compared different courtship traits, including male courtship sounds, in two sympatric Pomatoschistus species. Both species are characterised by having male and female courtship, and paternal care of eggs in nests under mussel shells and rocks. In addition to presenting novel observations, we reviewed the literature on courtship traits for both species and complemented it with new observations. We found that courting males of the common goby P. microps sing louder and produce sounds of shorter duration than males of the sand goby P. minutus. Furthermore, males of P. microps swim faster towards females during courtship than males of P. minutus. The eyes of P. minutus females turn black during courtship attempts, whereas this is not the case for females of P. microps. Species-specific differences in courtship sounds and behavior may lead to different susceptibility of the two species to environmental change such as noise pollution and turbidity.

  • 20.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Wilson, Joanna R.
    Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada; The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Amorim, M. Clara P.
    MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, ISPA, Instituto Universitário, Lisbon, Portugal; Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal..
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Male acoustic display in the sand goby – Essential cue in female choice, but unaffected by supplemental feeding2022In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 556, article id 151791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many teleost fishes use acoustic and visual signalling during courtship. Such displays may convey information about body condition. Here we experimentally altered body condition of sand goby (Pomatoschistus minutus) males to examine effects on acoustic and visual courtship and subsequent spawning decisions. Over two weeks, males fed in excess were fed daily, whereas food-deprived males were fed once a week. Females only spawned with males that produced courtship sound. However, there were no treatment effects on the occurrence of spawning and males fed in excess did not invest more in visual or acoustic courtship than food-deprived males. That said, males fed in excess built more well-covered nests, with more sand piled on top, compared to food-deprived males. Male condition measured as lipid content differed significantly between treatments. However, only males fed in excess differed in lipid content from wild caught males, indicating that in nature, males are of similar condition to males in the low condition treatment group. Apart from the importance of courtship sound, the only male or female behaviour predicting reproductive success was if male displayed in the nest opening. Males often produce courtship sounds together with a visual display in this position. A female dark-eye display did not associate with reproductive success which, together with previous results, suggest a non-ornamental function of this trait. We conclude that male courtship sounds appear to be crucial in female mate choice, but the information content of the courtship sounds and how it relates to male condition remains elusive.

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  • 21. Buendia, Ruben
    et al.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bosaeus, Ingvar
    Gil-Pita, Roberto
    Johannsson, G
    Ellegård, Lars
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Robustness study of the different immittance spectra and frequency ranges in bioimpedance spectroscopy analysis for assessment of total body composition2014In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, ISSN 0967-3334, Vol. 35, no 7, p. 1373-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The estimation of body fluids is a useful and common practice for assessment of disease status and therapy outcomes. Electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy (EBIS) methods are noninvasive, inexpensive and efficient alternatives for determination of body fluids. One of the main source of errors in EBIS measurements in the estimation of body fluids is capacitive coupling. In this paper an analysis of capacitive coupling in EBIS measurements was performed and the robustness of the different immittance spectra against it tested. On simulations the conductance (G) spectrum presented the smallest overall error, among all immittance spectra, in the estimation of the impedance parameters used to estimate body fluids. Afterwards the frequency range of 10–500 kHz showed to be the most robust band of the G spectrum. The accuracy of body fluid estimations from the resulting parameters that utilized G spectrum and parameters provided by the measuring device were tested on EBIS clinical measurements from growth hormone replacement therapy patients against estimations performed with dilution methods. Regarding extracellular fluid, the correlation between each EBIS method and dilution was 0.93 with limits of agreement of 1.06 ± 2.95 l for the device, 1.10 ± 2.94 l for G [10–500 kHz] and 1.04 ± 2.94 l for G [5–1000 kHz]. Regarding intracellular fluid, the correlation between dilution and the device was 0.91, same as for G [10–500 kHz] and 0.92 for G [5–1000 kHz]. Limits of agreement were 0.12 ± 4.46 l for the device, 0.09 ± 4.45 for G [10–500 kHz] and 0.04 ± 4.58 for G [5–1000 kHz]. Such close results between the EBIS methods validate the proposed approach of using G spectrum for initial Cole characterization and posterior clinical estimation of body fluids status.

  • 22.
    Bulkan, Gülru
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Retrofitting analysis of a biorefinery: Integration of 1st and 2nd generation ethanol through organosolv pretreatment of oat husks and fungal cultivation2021In: Bioresource Technology Reports, ISSN 2589-014X, Vol. 15, article id 100762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was dedicated to techno-economic analysis of an integrated 1st and 2nd generation biorefinery, where the organosolv pretreated oat husk and thin stillage is valorized through filamentous fungi and baker yeast. By this strategy, process economy can benefit from multiple value-added products including lignin (80% purity), and protein-rich biomass as feed/food ingredients. Ethanol recovery of organosolv pretreatment benefits the already existing equipment in 1st generation ethanol plant. The best results shows that the integration of 10 tons/h oat husk into a process using 18.8 tons/h grains results in increasing ethanol production from 5.2 to 7.5 tons/h, in addition to 1.6 tons/h lignin (80% purity) and 7.6 tons/h fungal biomass. Integrated process is beneficial not only for 2nd but also for 1st generation ethanol production. Selling the fungal biomass as feed and food increased the net present value (NPV) in comparison to conventional ethanol plant by 71% and 7.9-fold, respectively. © 2021 The Authors

  • 23.
    Bulkan, Gülru
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Yudhanti, Gerarda Tania
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Sitaresmi, Sitaresmi
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Millati, Ria
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Wikandari, Rachma
    Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Inhibitory and Stimulatory Effects of Fruit Bioactive Compounds on Edible Filamentous Fungi: Potential for Innovative Food Applications2022In: Fermentation, E-ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fermentation of fruit processing residuals (FPRs) with filamentous fungi can provide protein-rich food products. However, FPRs that contain bioactive compounds with antimicrobial properties present a major challenge. In this work, the resistance of two edible filamentous fungi, Rhizopus oligosporus and Neurospora intermedia, to 10 typically inhibiting bioactive compounds available in FPRs (epicatechin, quercetin, ellagic acid, betanin, octanol, hexanal, D-limonene, myrcene, car-3-ene, and ascorbic acid) was examined. These compounds’ inhibitory and stimulatory effects on fungal growth were examined individually. Three different concentrations (2.4, 24, and 240 mg/L) within the natural concentration range of these compounds in FPRs were tested. These bioactive compounds stimulated the growth yield and glucose consumption rate of R. oligosporus, while there was no increase in the biomass yield of N. intermedia. Ellagic acid caused an up to four-fold increase in the biomass yield of R. oligosporus. In addition, octanol and D-limonene showed antifungal effects against N. intermedia. These results may be helpful in the development of fungus-based novel fermented foods. View Full-Text

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  • 24. Bydén, S.
    et al.
    Hansson, E.
    Wemmer, S.
    Arnham, E.
    Carlsson, C.
    Gibson, K.
    Svensson, J-E.
    Schmidtbauer-Crona, J.
    Sjuhärad: fiskeguide, fishing guide, angelführer.2006Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Chandolias, Konstantinos
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pawar, Sudhanshu S.
    Circular Solutions, Fortum Sverige AB, Sweden.
    Vu, Hoang Danh
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wainaina, Steven
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bio‑hydrogen and VFA production from steel mill gases using pure and mixed bacterial cultures2023In: Bioresource Technology Reports, ISSN 2589-014X, Vol. 23, article id 101544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major source of CO2 emissions is the flaring of steel mill gas. This work demonstrated the enrichment of carboxydotrophic bacteria for converting steel mill gas into volatile fatty acids and H2, via gas fermentation. Several combinations of pure and mixed anaerobic cultures were used as inoculum in 0.5-L reactors, operated at 30 and 60 °C. The process was then scaled up in a 4-L membrane bioreactor, operated for 20 days, at 48 °C. The results showed that the enriched microbiomes can oxidize CO completely to produce H2/H+ which is subsequently used to fix the CO2. At 30 °C, a mixture of acetate, isobutyrate and propionate was obtained while H2 and acetate were the main products at 60 °C. The highest CO conversion and H2 production rate observed in the membrane bioreactor were 29 and 28 mL/LR/h, respectively. The taxonomic diversity of the bacterial community increased and the dominant species was Pseudomonas.

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  • 26.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Examples of Formulaity in Narratives and Scientific Communication2010In: Proceedings of the 1st International AMICUS Workshop, October 21, 2010, Vienna, Austria / [ed] Sándor Darányi, Piroska Lendvai, University of Szeged, Hungary , 2010, p. 29-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The AMICUS project was designed to promote scholarly networking in a topical area, motif recognition in texts, including its automation. Prior to doing so however it is necessary to show the theoretical underpinnings of the research idea. My argument is that evidence from different disciplines amounts to fragmented pieces of a bigger picture. By compiling them like pieces of a puzzle, one can see how the concept of formulaity applies to folklore texts and scholarly communication alike. Regardless of the actual name of the concept (e.g. motif, function, canonical form), what matters is that document parts and whole documents can be characterized by standard sequences of content elements, such formulaic expressions enabling higher-level document indexing and classification by machine learning, plus document retrieval. Information filtering plays a key role in the proposed technology.

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  • 27.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Forró, László
    Detecting Multiple Motif Co-occurrences in the Aarne-Thompson-Uther Tale Type Catalog: A Preliminary Survey2011In: Anales de Documentación, ISSN 1575-2437, E-ISSN 1697-7904Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 28.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Forró, László
    Toward Sequencing Multiple Motif Co-Occurrences2011In: Tanulmányok az örökségmenedzsmentröl 2. Kulturális örökségek kezelése [Studies in Heritage Management 2: The Management of Cultural Heritage]. / [ed] L. Bassa, Információs Társadalomért Alapítvány , 2011, p. 247-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalogs project subject field experience onto a multidimensional map which is then converted to a hierarchical list. In the case of the Aarne-Thompson-Uther Tale Type Catalog (ATU), this subject field is the global pattern of tale content defining tale types as canonical motif sequences. To extract and visualize such a map, we considered ATU as a corpus and ana-lysed two segments of it, “Supernatural adversaries” (types 300-399) in particular and “Tales of magic” (types 300-749) in general. The two corpora were scru-tinized for multiple motif co-occurrences and visualized by two-mode clustering of a bag-of-motif co-occurrences matrix. Findings indicate the presence of canonical content units above motif level as well. The organization scheme of folk narratives utilizing motif sequences is reminiscent of nucleotid sequences in the genetic code

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  • 29.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Lendvai, Piroska
    Proceedings of the First AMICUS Workshop, October 21, 2010 Vienna, Austria2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In cultural heritage objects, digitized or not, content indicators occurring on higher than word level are often called motifs or their equivalent. Their recognition for document classification and retrieval is largely unresolved. Work on identifying rhetorical, narrative and persuasive elements in scientific texts has been progressing, in several, but largely unconnected tracks. The AMICUS project1 (running between 2009 and 2012) set out to test a possible way to resolve these issues, starting with the identification of Proppian functions in folk tale corpora and adapting the solution to the identification of tale motifs or their functional counterparts. AMICUS has devoted its first project year to listing the corpora, tools, methods and contacts available to address these issues. The initiators of the project have identified a common need in the processing of texts from both the cultural heritage (CH) and scientific communication (SC) domains: to perform automated, large-scale higher-order text analytics, i.e., to reach an advanced level of text understanding so that structured knowledge can be extracted from unstructured text. The four research groups propose to tackle an important aspect of this complex issue by investigating how linguistic elements convey motifs in texts from the CH and the SC domains. Our shared working hypothesis is that the identity of higherorder content-bearing elements, i.e., textual units that are typically designated for e.g. document indexing, classification, enrichment, and the like, strongly depends on community perception.

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  • 30.
    Deng, Y.
    et al.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Ruan, Y.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Chen, J.
    Institute of Bioresource Engineering, Nanjing Technology University, Nanjing 210009, China.
    Qi, W.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Kong, D.
    Agricultural Experiment Station, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Ma, B.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Xu, X.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Lu, H.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Carbon availability shifts the nitrogen removal pathway and microbial community in biofilm airlift reactor2021In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 323, article id 124568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the response of nitrogen removal performance and microbial community to different carbon composites in biofilm airlift reactors for wastewater treatment. Three reactors were filled with poly (butylene succinate) and bamboo powder composite at the blending ratio of 9:1, 1:1 and 1:9. Increasing the component of bamboo powder in the carrier reduced the carbon availability and had an adverse effect on nitrate removal efficiency. However, bamboo powder improved the ammonia removal rate which mainly through autotrophic nitrification. Three reactors exhibited distinct microbial compositions in both bacterial and fungal diversity. High inclusion of bamboo power decreased the relative abundance of denitrifiers Denitromonas and increased the relative abundance of nitrifiers, including Nitromonas, Nitrospina and Nitrospira. Moreover, correlation network revealed a competitive interaction between the taxa responsible for ammonia removal and nitrate removal processes. Those results indicated the feasibility of steering nitrogen removal pathway through carrier formulation in wastewater treatment.

  • 31.
    Devanthi, P V P
    et al.
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Kho, K
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Nurdiansyah, R
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Briot, A
    Bioprocess & Process Engineering Department, Polytech Nantes, University of Nantes, Gavy Océanis, CS 70152, 44633 Saint-Nazaire, France.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Aslanzadeh, S
    Indonesia International Institute for Life Sciences, Pulomas Barat Kavling 88, Jakarta 13210, Indonesia.
    Do Kombucha Symbiotic Cultures of Bacteria and Yeast Affect Bacterial Cellulose Yield in Molasses?2021In: JOURNAL OF FUNGI, ISSN 2309-608X, Vol. 7, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a valuable biopolymer typically observed in Kombucha with many potential food applications. Many studies highlight yeast's roles in providing reducing sugars, used by the bacteria to grow and produce BC. However, whether yeast could enhance the BC yields remains unclear. This study investigates the effect of yeast Dekkera bruxellensis on bacteria Komagataeibacter intermedius growth and BC production in molasses medium. The results showed that the co-culture stimulated K. intermedius by similar to 2 log CFU/mL, which could be attributed to enhanced reducing sugar utilization. However, BC yields decreased by similar to 24%, suggesting a negative impact of D. bruxellensis on BC production. In contrast to other studies, regardless of D. bruxellensis, K. intermedius increased the pH to similar to 9.0, favoring the BC production. Furthermore, pH increase was slower in co-culture as compared to single culture cultivation, which could be the reason for lower BC yields. This study indicates that co-culture could promote synergistic growth but results in the BC yield reduction. This knowledge can help design a more controlled fermentation process for optimum bacterial growth and, ultimately, BC production.

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  • 32. Drotz, Marcus
    et al.
    Kyrkander, Tina
    Lundberg, Stefan
    Svensson, Jan-Erik
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Främmande arter invaderar våra sötvatten2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På senare år har allt fler främmande, invasiva arter börjat breda ut sig i våra sötvatten. En främmande art är en organism som har spridits utanför sitt naturliga utbredningsområde med människans hjälp. Detta kan ha skett avsiktligt eller av misstag. En del av dessa nya arter ställer till problem, andra gör det inte. Här beskrivs övervakningen av några invasiva arter samt hur man kan arbeta för att begränsa dem. Ullhandskrabba, vandrarmussla och sjögull kommer av allt att döma att öka sin utbredning i Sverige de närmaste åren. Det finns idag ett stort antal främmande arter rapporterade från svenska sötvatten och i vår närhet finns ett femtiotal nya arter som kan tänkas etablera sig här. Alla dessa arter kommer inte nödvändigtvis att skapa problem men kunskap om deras biologi och observationer från allmänheten kommer att betyda mycket även i det framtida övervakningsarbetet.

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  • 33.
    Duan, Y M
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Wu, H H
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Yang, J F
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Li, Z L
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Ni, X H
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, J T
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Zhang, Z Q
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Li, H K
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, China.
    Biochar regulates bacterial-fungal diversity and associated enzymatic activity during sheep manure composting2022In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aimed to evaluate the coexistence of bacterial and fungal diversity and their correlation with enzymatic activity in response to biochar. This study performed aerobic composting based on typical agricultural wastes of sheep manure with additive apple tree branch biochar at distinct concentration (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 12.5% corresponding from T1 to T6). The result demonstrated that appropriate amendment of biochar enriched bacterial diversity (1646-1686 OTUs) but interestingly decreased fungal diversity (542-630 OTUs) compared to control (1444 and 682 OTUs). Biochar addition enhanced all enzymatic activities and its correlation with bacterial was more complex than fungal community (786 and 359 connect edges). The dominant microbes comprised of Firmicutes (45.2-35.2%), Proteobacteria (14.0-17.5%), Basidiomycota (32.4-49.5%) and Ascomycota (11.3-37.5%) among all the treatments. Overall, biochar regulates the composting microenvironment by influencing the microbial diversity and associated enzymatic activities.

  • 34.
    Duan, Y M
    et al.
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Yang, J F
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Guo, Y R
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Wu, X P
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Tian, Y L
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Li, H K
    College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Pollution control in biochar-driven clean composting: Emphasize on heavy metal passivation and gaseous emissions mitigation2021In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 420, article id 126635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present study was focus on the pollution control aspect of gaseous mitigation and heavy metal passivation as well as their associated bacterial communities driven by apple tree branch biochar (BB) during sheep manure composting. Six treatment was performed with distinct concentration of BB from 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 12.5% as T1 to T6. Compared with compost without additive, biochar-based composting recorded faster thermophilic process (4thd) and longer duration (12-14d), lower gaseous emission in terms of ammonia (5.37-10.29 g), nitrous oxide (0.12-0.47 g) and methane (4.38-30.29 g). Notably highest temperature (65.3 celcius) and active thermophilic duration (14d), minimized gaseous volatilization were detected in 10%BB composting. Aspect of non-degradability and enrichment-concentration properties of heavy metals, the total copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) were increased (from initial 12.71-17.91 to final 16.36-29.36 mg/kg and 107.39-146.58-161.48-211.91 mg/ kg). In view of available diethylene triamine pentacetic acid (DTPA) extractable form, DTPA-Cu and DTPA-Zn from 4.29 to 6.57 and 31.66-39.32 mg/kg decreased to 3.75-4.82 and 23.43-40.54 mg/kg, especially the maximized passivation rate of 46.95% and 56.27% were present in 10%BB composting. Additionally, bacterial diversity of biochar-based composting was increased (1817-2310 OTUs) than control (1686 OTUs) and dominant by Firmicutes (52.75%), Bacteroidetes (28.41%) and Actinobacteriota (13.98%). Validated 10% biochar-based composting is the optimal option for effectively control environmental pollution to obtain hygienic composting.

  • 35.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Improving the biorefinery "status" of ethanol plants with edible filamentous fungi2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Green, L
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Faust, E
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hinchcliffe, J
    University of Gothenburg.
    Brijs, J
    University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    Holmes, A
    University of Gothenburg.
    Englund-Örn, F
    University of Gothenburg.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Roques, J.A.C.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Leder, E.H.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Sandblom, E
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kvarnemo,
    University of Gothenburg.
    Data supporting: Invader at the edge - genomic origins and physiological differences of round gobies across a steep urban salinity gradient2022Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Species invasions are a global problem of increasing concern, especially in highly connected aquatic environments. Despite this, salinity conditions can pose physiological barriers to their spread and understanding them is important for management. In Scandinavia’s largest cargo port, the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), is established across a steep salinity gradient. We used 12 937 SNPs to identify the genetic origin and diversity of three sites along the salinity gradient and round goby from western, central and northern Baltic Sea, as well as north European rivers. Fish from two sites from the extreme ends of the gradient were also acclimated to freshwater and seawater, and tested for respiratory and osmoregulatory physiology. Fish from the high salinity environment in the outer port showed higher genetic diversity, and closer relatedness to the other regions, compared to fish from lower salinity upstream the river. Fish from the high salinity site also had higher maximum metabolic rate, fewer blood cells and lower blood Ca2+. Despite these genotypic and phenotypic differences, salinity acclimation affected fish from both sites in the same way: seawater increased the blood osmolality and Na+ levels, and freshwater increased the levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Our results show genotypic and phenotypic differences over short spatial scales across this steep salinity gradient. These patterns of the physiologically robust round goby are likely driven by multiple introductions into the high salinity site, and a process of sorting, likely based on behaviour or selection, along the gradient. Since this euryhaline fish risks spreading from this area, seascape genomics and phenotypic characterisation can inform management strategies even within an area as small as a coastal harbour inlet.

  • 37.
    Green, Leon
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden;Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg Strömstad Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Faust, Ellika
    Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden;Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, Department of Marine Sciences University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden.
    Hinchcliffe, James
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Brijs, Jeroen
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden; Institute of Marine Biology University of Hawai'i, Kaneohe Hawai'i USA.
    Holmes, Andrew
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden.
    Englund Örn, Felix
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden.
    Roques, Jonathan A. C.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Leder, Erica H.
    Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden; Tjärnö Marine Laboratory, Department of Marine Sciences University of Gothenburg Strömstad Sweden;Natural History Museum University of Oslo, Oslo Norway.
    Sandblom, Erik
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg Sweden; Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Strömstad Sweden.
    Invader at the edge — Genomic origins and physiological differences of round gobies across a steep urban salinity gradient2023In: Evolutionary Applications, E-ISSN 1752-4571, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species invasions are a global problem of increasing concern, especially in highly connected aquatic environments. Despite this, salinity conditions can pose physiological barriers to their spread, and understanding them is important for management. In Scandinavia's largest cargo port, the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) is established across a steep salinity gradient. We used 12,937 SNPs to identify the genetic origin and diversity of three sites along the salinity gradient and round goby from western, central and northern Baltic Sea, as well as north European rivers. Fish from two sites from the extreme ends of the gradient were also acclimated to freshwater and seawater, and tested for respiratory and osmoregulatory physiology. Fish from the high-salinity environment in the outer port showed higher genetic diversity, and closer relatedness to the other regions, compared to fish from lower salinity upstream the river. Fish from the high-salinity site also had higher maximum metabolic rate, fewer blood cells and lower blood Ca2+. Despite these genotypic and phenotypic differences, salinity acclimation affected fish from both sites in the same way: seawater increased the blood osmolality and Na+ levels, and freshwater increased the levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Our results show genotypic and phenotypic differences over short spatial scales across this steep salinity gradient. These patterns of the physiologically robust round goby are likely driven by multiple introductions into the high-salinity site, and a process of sorting, likely based on behaviour or selection, along the gradient. This euryhaline fish risks spreading from this area, and seascape genomics and phenotypic characterization can inform management strategies even within an area as small as a coastal harbour inlet. 

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  • 38.
    Iyer, Sweta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Luminescent textiles using biobased products: A bioinspired approach2020Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature has designed a few biobased molecules that are responsible for bioluminescence and photoluminescence in some living species. In this thesis, the potential use of luminescence phenomena existing in nature toward the attainment of luminescent textiles was explored.

    The primary focus of the thesis was to create a biomimetic design method to obtain luminescent textiles using biobased products. In the first part of the thesis, a detailed literature study on luminescence phenomena seen in nature was reviewed and the results allowed to form the selection of luminous bacteria reaction system depending upon the availability, regeneration of the substrate, and cost. Eco technologies such as air atmospheric plasma and cold remote plasma treatment were used for textile activation and enzyme immobilization. Primarily, the catalytic activity and luminescence efficiency of the luminous bacteria system were evaluated and optimized in the aqueous phase, by intensity measurements using a luminometer. Furthermore, the optimized reaction system was incorporated onto textiles to evaluate the bioluminescence effect. The evaluation of the bioluminescent system on textiles showed that the relative light intensity (RLU) as high as 60,000 RLU equivalent to that of LED light could be achieved. The study revealed its first successful attempt to utilize a biomimetic strategy for immobilization of enzyme(s) involved in the luminous bacteria reaction system onto a plasma-activated microfibrous nonwoven textile to attain biomimetic/bio luminescent materials that can be used for various applications such as biosensors, biomedical, safety and aesthetic use.

    Furthermore, the inherent photoluminescence property of biobased molecules riboflavin (RF) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) were explored with the aim to obtain multifunctional photoluminescent textiles. Cellulosic, polyester, silk, and wool-based photoluminescent textiles with UV protection, coloration properties were obtained using traditional methods such as diffusion, screen printing, coating, and use of resource-efficient digital printing techniques allowed to obtain antibacterial properties along with photoluminescence effect.

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  • 39.
    Iyer, Sweta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. ENSAIT.
    Behary, Nemeshwaree
    ENSAIT, GEMTEX.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bio-inspired approaches to design bio-luminescent textiles2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Luminescent textiles are being increasingly used in apparel and sportswear aswell as in buildings, agriculture and automotives, for safety alert or forillumination or as a design feature[1]. Till now these luminescent textiles havebeen based on technologies such as LED, luminescent particles (rare earthmetals and metal oxides), which are not so eco‐friendly[2].Bio‐inspired strategies can provide efficient methods to achieve eco friendlybioluminescent textiles. Research projects have explored ways which aremainly based on culture of bioluminescent algae[3] or bacteria on textiles.Here we present another approach to achieve bioluminesence using biobasedproducts from various living organisms such as fireflies, fungi, earthwormsthat are found in land and in jelly fishes, shrimps, dinoflagellates, corals inmarine environment [4]. In order to mimic the luminescence effect seen innature, reaction mechanisms in various bioluminescent living organisms arestudied and the components or molecules responsible for luminescence areidentified [5‐10]. Most of the time, these involve enzymatic reactions.However the main challenge is to reproduce the bioluminescent mechanismand to adapt it to new materials which can yield some eco efficient bioinspired luminescent textiles.

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  • 40.
    Jacobsson, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Textile Technology, University of Borås, Sweden; Department of Medical Technology - Management and Development, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden..
    Abtahi, Farhad
    Department of Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden.
    The role of compression in large scale data transfer and storage of typical biomedical signals at hospitals2023In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 29, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In modern hospitals, monitoring patients' vital signs and other biomedical signals is standard practice. With the advent of data-driven healthcare, Internet of medical things, wearable technologies, and machine learning, we expect this to accelerate and to be used in new and promising ways, including early warning systems and precision diagnostics. Hence, we see an ever-increasing need for retrieving, storing, and managing the large amount of biomedical signal data generated. The popularity of standards, such as HL7 FHIR for interoperability and data transfer, have also resulted in their use as a data storage model, which is inefficient. This article raises concern about the inefficiency of using FHIR for storage of biomedical signals and instead highlights the possibility of a sustainable storage based on data compression. Most reported efforts have focused on ECG signals; however, many other typical biomedical signals are understudied. In this article, we are considering arterial blood pressure, photoplethysmography, and respiration. We focus on simple lossless compression with low implementation complexity, low compression delay, and good compression ratios suitable for wide adoption. Our results show that it is easy to obtain a compression ratio of 2.7:1 for arterial blood pressure, 2.9:1 for photoplethysmography, and 4.1:1 for respiration. 

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  • 41. Jarvi-Laturi, M.
    et al.
    Lindstrom, K.
    Kvarnemo, C.
    Svensson, Ola
    Department of Zoology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sand goby males trade off between defence against egg predators and sneak intrusions2011In: Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0952-8369, E-ISSN 1469-7998, Vol. 283, no 4, p. 269-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to life-history theory, a care-taking parent should balance investment in current and future reproduction in such a way that it maximizes lifetime reproductive success. In the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus, a small marine fish with paternal care, nest-guarding males may lose current reproductive success to both parasitically fertilizing males and egg predators. Here, we observed sand gobies at a marine and a brackish site, two geographically distant and ecologically different habitats. In a field experiment, we found that sand gobies at the marine site suffered from severe egg predation by netted dogwhelks Nassarius nitidus, which are lacking at the brackish site. Because egg laying takes hours and several females often lay eggs sequentially in one nest, the risk of parasitic spawnings and egg predation overlaps in time during breeding activities. Hypothesizing that egg predators might influence the success of parasitic spawnings, we then simulated these natural conditions in a laboratory experiment with the presence or absence of egg predators, combined with the presence of sneaker males. As expected, in the egg predator treatment, egg-guarding males had to compromise between defence behaviours and thus had less time to devote to defence against sneaker males. Sneaker males took advantage of the situation and approached the nests more actively than in the predator-free treatment. However, the increase in approaches did not result in more successful parasitic fertilizations by sneaker males, as determined using microsatellite DNA. Nevertheless, in nature the adjustment of time budgets by the egg-guarding male are likely to have serious fitness consequences, both if the male fails to defend his paternity and if he fails to defend his offspring.

  • 42.
    Karimi, Sajjad
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Filamentous Fungi as a Sustainable Ingredient for Fish Feed2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited feed ingredients hinder aquaculture’s rapid growth. Current unsustainable fish feeding practices use ingredients like fishmeal and soybean meal, which could be directly consumed for as human food. This demands novel alternatives for fish nutrition. While studies have explored plant/animal-based protein sources, they have not fully met fish feed nutritional needs. Single-cell proteins like bacteria, algae, and fungi are gaining attention as sustainable alternatives to traditional fish feed protein sources. Filamentous fungal biomass stands out with its high protein content, essential amino acids, and functional amino acids like lysine and arginine. This biomass also provides other nutrients that fish commonly require, such as essential fatty acids (linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid), minerals (phosphorus, potassium, calcium), vitamins (B, C, E), and pigments. Incorporating cell wall components like chitin, chitosan, and beta-glucans makes fungal biomass a functional feed ingredient that enhances fish immune systems. When applied to rainbow trout diets, fungal-based feed is highly digestible, comparable to fishmeal-based feed, and positively impacts gut microbiomes. The increase of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis) after consuming fungal-based feed suggests its potential as a fish feed prebiotic. 

    While fungal biomass holds promise as a nutrient-rich fish feed source, its large-scale production on synthetic substrates poses economic challenges. To optimize production, organic-rich waste like Distiller's Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS) and thin stillage from ethanol production are explored as substrates. Thin stillage, previously considered for fungal biomass production, faces difficulties due to its high solid content. Optimizing thin stillage's suspended solids for cultivating different filamentous fungi from Ascomycetes and Zygomycetes is necessary. Submerged cultivation of Aspergillus oryzae, Rhizopus delemar, and Neurospora intermedia was tested using various thin stillage dilutions. Cultivating these species in 75% diluted thin stillage yielded the highest biomass. The harvested fungal biomass contained around 50% protein and 45% essential amino acids, with ash content below 10%, enhancing fish digestibility. Notably, when 75% diluted thin stillage was used, the washing step could be skipped without compromising final biomass quality, streamlining production processes. Using fungal-based feed in fish nutrition presents a sustainable alternative to traditional fishmeal-based feed. It goes beyond protein and amino acids, providing other essential nutrients such as fatty acids, minerals, pigments etc. High digestibility and positive effects on fish health through gut microbiome modulation make it a valuable substitute for common protein sources. To enhance sustainability, scaling up fungal biomass production using diluted thin stillage as a substrate is a promising avenue. 

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  • 43.
    Kawa-Rygielska, Joanna
    et al.
    Department of Fermentation and Cereals Technology, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 51-630 Wrocław, Poland.
    Pietrzak, Witold
    Department of Fermentation and Cereals Technology, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 51-630 Wrocław, Poland.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    High-Efficiency Conversion of Bread Residues to Ethanol and Edible Biomass Using Filamentous Fungi at High Solids Loading: A Biorefinery Approach2022In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 12, no 13, article id 6405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bread residues represent a significant fraction of retail food wastes, becoming a severe environmental challenge and an economic loss for the food sector. They are, however, an attractive resource for bioconversion into value-added products. In this study, the edible filamentous fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae were employed for the production of bioethanol and high-protein biomass by cultivation on enzymatically liquefied bread-waste medium at 150 g/L solids. The fermentation of hydrolysate by N. intermedia resulted in the ethanol titer of 32.2 g/L and biomass yield of 19.2 g/L with ca. 45% protein. However, the fermentation ended with a considerable amount of residual fermentable sugars; therefore, the liquid medium after the first fermentation was distilled and fermented again by two fungal strains (N. intermedia and A. oryzae). The fermentations resulted in the production of additional ethanol and biomass. A. oryzae showed better performance in the production of biomass, while the other strain yielded more ethanol. The final products’ yield ranged 0.29–0.32 g EtOH/g and 0.20–0.22 g biomass/g bread waste depending on the strain used in the second fermentation. The study shows that valorization of bread residuals by fungi is a promising option for the production of biofuels and foodstuff within the circular bioeconomy approach. 

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  • 44. Kvarnemo, C.
    et al.
    Svensson, Ola
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Forsgren, E.
    Parental behaviour in relation to food availability in the common goby1998In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 56, p. 1285-1290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the common goby, Pomatoschistus microps (Pisces, Gobiidae), males build nests under mussel shells where they care for the eggs until hatching. To investigate why male common gobies cannibalize their own eggs (filial cannibalism), we conducted a feeding experiment. Males given little food ate from their eggs more often than males given food in excess. However, males given mussel meat in excess did not eat more of their eggs than males fed with both mussel meat in excess and goby eggs. This may suggest that male common gobies cannibalize their eggs to obtain energy rather than essential nutrients lacking in other diets. Moreover, males ate their whole clutch if it was exceptionally small regardless of food treatment, suggesting that males stop investing in their clutch if its reproductive value is less;than the cost of guarding it. Thus, whole clutch cannibalism and partial clutch cannibalism seem to be governed by different factors. Furthermore, poorly built nests were associated with starved males, suggesting that nest concealing is costly. There was an association between how well the nest was built and partial clutch filial cannibalism, suggesting that the appearance of the nest may indicate the condition of the male, and thus the risk of filial cannibalism. (C) 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  • 45. Kvarnemo, C.
    et al.
    Svensson, Ola
    Department of Zoology, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Manson, W.
    Investment in testes, sperm-duct glands and lipid reserves differs between male morphs but not between early and late breeding season in Pomatoschistus minutus2010In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 76, no 7, p. 1609-1625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus, a nest-holding fish with paternal care, focused on gonadal investment among males of different sizes collected early and late in the breeding season. All males caught at the nest had breeding colour, whereas trawl-caught fish consisted of males both with and without colour. The absence or presence of breeding colour was a good predictor of testes investment. Compared to males with breeding colour, males without colour were smaller in body size but had extraordinarily large testes. In absolute terms, testes mass of males without breeding colour was on average 3.4 times greater than those of males with breeding colour. Since small colourless males are known to reproduce as sneaker males, this heavy investment in testes probably reflects that they are forced to spawn under sperm competition. Contrary to testes size, sperm-duct glands were largest among males with breeding colour. These glands produce mucins used for making sperm-containing mucous trails that males place in the nest before and during spawning. Since both sneakers and nest-holders potentially could benefit from having large glands, this result is intriguing. Yet, high mucus production may be more important for nest-holders, because it also protects developing embryos from infections. There was no significant effect of season on body size, testes or sperm-duct glands size, but colourless males tended to be less common late in the season. Possibly this may indicate that individual small colourless males develop into their more colourful counterparts within the breeding season. (C) 2010 The Authors Journal compilation (C) 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles

  • 46.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    et al.
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Green, Leon
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindström, Kai
    Environmental and Marine Biology Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Schöld, Sofie
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Griful‐Dones, Martina
    Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Biology University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N.
    Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Marine Sciences University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leder, Erica H.
    Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Marine Sciences University of Gothenburg Gothenburg Sweden;Department of Biology University of Turku Turku Finland;Natural History Museum University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Molecular, behavioural and morphological comparisons of sperm adaptations in a fish with alternative reproductive tactics2023In: Evolutionary Applications, E-ISSN 1752-4571, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 338-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In species with alternative reproductive tactics, there is much empirical support that parasitically spawning males have larger testes and greater sperm numbers as an evolved response to a higher degree of sperm competition, but support for higher sperm performance (motility, longevity and speed) by such males is inconsistent. We used the sand goby (Pomatoschistus minutus) to test whether sperm performance differed between breeding-coloured males (small testes, large mucus-filled sperm-duct glands; build nests lined with sperm-containing mucus, provide care) and parasitic sneaker-morph males (no breeding colouration, large testes, rudimentary sperm-duct glands; no nest, no care). We compared motility (per cent motile sperm), velocity, longevity of sperm, gene expression of testes and sperm morphometrics between the two morphs. We also tested if sperm-duct gland contents affected sperm performance. We found a clear difference in gene expression of testes between the male morphs with 109 transcripts differentially expressed between the morphs. Notably, several mucin genes were upregulated in breeding-coloured males and two ATP-related genes were upregulated in sneaker-morph males. There was a partial evidence of higher sperm velocity in sneaker-morph males, but no difference in sperm motility. Presence of sperm-duct gland contents significantly increased sperm velocity, and nonsignificantly tended to increase sperm motility, but equally so for the two morphs. The sand goby has remarkably long-lived sperm, with only small or no decline in motility and velocity over time (5 min vs. 22 h), but again, this was equally true for both morphs. Sperm length (head, flagella, total and flagella-to-head ratio) did not differ between morphs and did not correlate with sperm velocity for either morph. Thus, other than a clear difference in testes gene expression, we found only modest differences between the two male morphs, confirming previous findings that increased sperm performance as an adaptation to sperm competition is not a primary target of evolution. 

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  • 47.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Green, Leon
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Lindström, Kail
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Schöld, Sofie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Griful-Dones, Marina
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leder, Erica
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fish ART & sperm performance2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In species with alternative reproductive tactics (ART), parasitically spawning males have larger testes and greater sperm numbers as an evolved response to a higher degree of sperm competition. But do they also have higher sperm performance? We used sand gobies to test if it differs between breeding-coloured and sneaker-morph males. We compared sperm motility, velocity, longevity, morphometrics and gene expression of testes between the two morphs. We found 109 transcripts differentially expressed between the morphs. Notably, several mucin genes were upregulated in breeding-coloured males and two ATP-related genes were upregulated in sneaker-morph males. There was partial evidence of higher sperm velocity in sneaker-morph males, but no difference in sperm motility. Sand gobies have remarkably long-lived sperm, with almost no decline in motility and velocity over 22 hours, but again, this was equally true for both morphs. Sperm length did not differ between morphs and did not correlate with sperm velocity for either morph. Thus, other than a clear difference in testes gene expression, we found only modest differences between the two male morphs, confirming previous findings that increased sperm performance as an adaptation to sperm competition does not appear to be a primary target of evolution.

  • 48.
    Leder, Erica H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Le Moan, Alan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Töpel, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Havenhand, Jonathan N.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindström, Kai
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Volckaert, Filip A. M.
    KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Kvarnemo, Lotta
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson,
    Data from: Post‐glacial establishment of locally adapted fish populations over a steep salinity gradient2020Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of colonization of new habitats that appear from rapidly changing environments are interesting and highly relevant to our understanding of divergence and speciation. Here, we analyse phenotypic and genetic variation involved in the successful establishment of a marine fish (sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus) over a steep salinity drop from 35 PSU in the North Sea (NE Atlantic) to two PSU in the inner parts of the post-glacial Baltic Sea. We first show that populations are adapted to local salinity in a key reproductive trait, the proportion of motile sperm. Thereafter, we show that genome variation at 22,190 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shows strong differentiation among populations along the gradient. Sequences containing outlier SNPs and transcriptome sequences, mapped to a draft genome, reveal associations with genes with relevant functions for adaptation in this environment but without overall evidence of functional enrichment. The many contigs involved suggest polygenic differentiation. We trace the origin of this differentiation using demographic modelling and find the most likely scenario is that at least part of the genetic differentiation is older than the Baltic Sea and is a result of isolation of two lineages prior to the current contact over the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition zone.

  • 49. Levan, G
    et al.
    Sandberg, P
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dahllöf, B
    Martinsson, T
    Wettergren, Y
    Selective gene amplification in mammalian cells1984In: Hereditas, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. , 1984, p. 278-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective gene amplification in mammalian cells is now recognized as a common cellular response to selection in a number of different toxic drugs, such as methotrexate (MTX). coformycin, PALA, hydroxyurea (HU), vincristine (VCR). colcemid (COL) and actinomycin D (AMD). Recently, we have studied SEWA murine tumor cells in culture exhibiting the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) phenotype. Cells subjected to stepwise selection in AMD, VCR or COL all develop double minute chromosomes (DM), which are a cytogenetic expression of gene amplification. These lines overproduce a 21 K acidic soluble protein and show a high degree of cross resistance, which is typical for the PDR phenotype. Other workers have shown that cells with this phenotype exhibit a shift in membrane-bound glycoproteins from 90- 100 K to 150-170 K. Thus, it is likely that several genes are involved in the development of the PDR phenotype. We have isolated a fraction highly enriched in DM from an AMD-resistant SEWA subline. DNA was extracted from this fraction, and several DM-specific DNA-probes were developed. These probes were used to study independently derived SEWA sublines resistant to AMD, VCR, COL, MTX and HU. The results showed that the investigated amplified DNA-segments in AMD-, VCR-. and COL-resistant lines exhibited a high degree of sequence sequence homology, indicating that basically the same segment was amplified in the 3 inductions. In contrast. the amplified DNA-segments in MTX- and HU-resistant lines that do not show the PDR phenotype, displayed no sequence homology to the probes used.

  • 50.
    Li, W.
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Shi, C.
    Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Yu, Y.
    Zhejiang Water Healer Environmental Technology Co., Ltd, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Ruan, Y.
    Institute of Agricultural Bio-Environmental Engineering, College of Bio-systems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Kong, D.
    Agricultural Experiment Station, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Lv, X.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou, China.
    Xu, P.
    Department of Tea Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
    Mukesh Kumar, Awasthi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100, PR China.
    Dong, M.
    Key Laboratory of Hangzhou City for Ecosystem Protection and Restoration, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China.
    Interrelationships between tetracyclines and nitrogen cycling processes mediated by microorganisms: A review2021In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 319, article id 124036Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and low cost, tetracyclines (TCs) are a class of antibiotics widely used for human and veterinary medical purposes and as a growth-promoting agent for aquaculture. Interrelationships between TCs and nitrogen cycling have attracted scientific attention due to the complicated processes mediated by microorganisms. TCs negatively impact the nitrogen cycling; however, simultaneous degradation of TCs during nitrogen cycling mediated by microorganisms can be achieved. This review encapsulates the background and distribution of TCs in the environment. Additionally, the main nitrogen cycling process mediated by microorganisms were retrospectively examined. Furthermore, effects of TCs on the nitrogen cycling processes, namely nitrification, denitrification, and anammox, have been summarized. Finally, the pathway and microbial mechanism of degradation of TCs accompanied by nitrogen cycling processes were reviewed, along with the scope for prospective studies. © 2020

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