Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 60
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Interactive Textile Structures: Creating Multifunctional Textiles based on Smart Materials2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textiles of today are materials with applications in almost all our activities. We wear clothes all the time and we are surrounded with textiles in almost all our environments. The integration of multifunctional values in such a common material has become a special area of interest in recent years. Smart Textile represents the next generation of textiles anticipated for use in several fashion, furnishing and technical textile applications. The term smart is used to refer to materials that sense and respond in a pre-defined manner to environmental stimuli. The degree of smartness varies and it is possible to enhance the intelligence further by combining these materials with a controlling unit, for example a microprocessor. As an interdisciplinary area Smart Textile includes design spaces from several areas; the textile design space, the information technology design space and the design space of material science. This thesis addresses how Smart Textiles affect the textile design space; how the introduction of smart materials and information technology affects the creation of future textile products. The aim is to explore the convergence between textiles, smart materials and information technology and to contribute to providing a basis for future research in this area. The research method is based on a series of interlinked experiments designed through the research questions and the research objects. The experiments are separated into two different sections: interactive textile structures and health monitoring. The result is a series of basic methods for how interactive textile structures are created and a general system for health monitoring. Furthermore the result consists of a new design space, advanced textile design. In advanced textile design the focus is set on the relation between the different natures of a textile object: its physical structure and its structure in the context of design and use.

  • 2. Bergström, Jenny
    et al.
    Clark, Brendon
    Frigo, Alberto
    Mazé, Ramia
    Redström, Johan
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Becoming materials: material forms and forms of practice2010In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 21, no 3, 155-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of development toward ‘smart’ materials, materials now enable an expanding range of aesthetic expressions and user experiences. These materials are fundamentally temporal in their capacity to assume multiple, discrete states of expression that can be repeatedly and minutely controlled. These materials come to be, or become, only over time and in context—they are becoming materials. Thus, in the development and application of such materials, we must engage more extensively with the experience of materials in practices of design and of use. This paper introduces and discusses the concept of becoming materials—as well as the implications for practice—through a series of examples from our own practice-led research within art, design and architecture. Coming to terms with the implications for material practices of design and of use, we suggest, requires the development of new concepts and methods for doing and studying the design of becoming materials.

  • 3.
    Bondesson, Amy
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Costumes and Wallhanging2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work deals with Smart Textiles in interaction with the body. We design textiles and outfits as tools that can influence fashion and textile design. Central to our work is that artistic envisioning can point to new possibilities and values, in which we want to stress the importance of combining traditional materials and methods with contemporary and future functions in order to obtain sustainable ideas. The film documents a performance, where dancers create a link between the body, the textile material and the room surrounding the body. The textile material and the garment are to inspire movement that, in turn, creates development; when a person wears the garment and moves in a certain way or touches other persons, the visual expression of the room changes through an electronic signal. In this case, the colour of the pattern of the textile draping changes to the static pattern that is printed on the person’s outfit. The point of the show was to show possibilities of non-static and dynamic design through scenic expression.

  • 4.
    Bondesson, Amy
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile dimensions: an expressive textile interface2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Computation and new materials are entering the world of textiles, challenging our view on the textile material. As new techniques and electrically conductive fibres enable the design of textile circuits and computationally active textiles [2], the areas of smart textile design and interaction design start to merge. Wearable computing [cf.1], the notion of moving computational tools directly onto the body, might have been the first approach to bring computation technology closer to the area of clothing.. In an approach to investigate new enhanced forms of expressional interaction through textiles, the relationship between tactile and visual aesthetical properties are explored in the present paper. Textile Dimensions, an interactive set of textiles, shows how clothes and textiles become interfaces themselves, able to sense and react on external stimuli in expressive ways.

  • 5.
    Bresky, Erik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Edström, Susanne
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ledendal, Marie
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nordqvist, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Smart Textiles2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 2-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Den digitala utgåvan av Zacharias Topelius’ Skrifter. Evalueringsrapport2012Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Digitized library collections: an open source approach2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    If publicly funded libraries (PFL) such as national libraries were to adopt a more open source approach when making digitized cultural heritage (CH) material available, users would be granted not only open access to delivery files at a surface level (in e.g. PDF, JPG, or XHTML) but ”deep access” to archival file material and technical documentation as well (such as TIFF, full XML/TEI, scripts, style sheets and machine instructions). PFL:s would thereby strengthen the force behind the values of equal access, of supporting education and research, and of distributing not only digitized material but competence and methods as well. They might also come one step closer to sharing information-rich material with other digitizing institutions by constructing valid banks of commonly and mutually accessible digitized CH material. As of yet however, this is far from the case. Many PFL:s are rather adopting a policy to restrict public access to light-weight delivery versions while charging users for access to the archival, deep level (or hiding it away altogether). This paper examines some of the arguments for such a restrictive policy and discusses feasible ways of bypassing some of the open source obstacles.

  • 8.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Learning by Digitizing2012In: Libraries in the Digital Age (LIDA) 2012 Proceedings / [ed] Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić, Franjo Pehar, University of Zadar , 2012, Vol. 12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish School of Library and Information Science has been offering dedicated courses in cultural heritage digitization since 2004. This paper describes the implementation of new assignments, projects and events in the courses that were developed since 2008. These new events include a critical image editing workshop, a text encoding enhancement of “dirty” OCR texts, experimental and critical evaluation of OCR software performance, and the design of a realistic digitization plan. The course innovations strengthen the course’s pedagogical legacy of sustainability and Dewey’s pragmatism, particularly of having the students perform hands-on work in digitization, experimenting with technology and drawing critical conclusions from the analysis of the results. To avoid some of the risks of naïve pragmatism however, the pedagogy and course design draws ideas from Lave’s and Wenger’s notions of situated learning by having the students engage in both local material with a situated relevance and testing their ideas in in particular existing communities of practice and/or expertise.

  • 9.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Konstantinidis, K
    CERTH..
    Papadopoulos, S
    CERTH..
    A Potential Surface Underlying Meaning?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine learning algorithms utilizing gradient descent to identify concepts or more general learnables hint at a so-far ignored possibility, namely that local and global minima represent any vocabulary as a landscape against which evaluation of the results can take place. A simple example to illustrate this idea would be a potential surface underlying gravitation. However, to construct a gravitation-based representation of, e.g., word meaning, only the distance between localized items is a given in the vector space, whereas the equivalents of mass or charge are unknown in semantics. Clearly, the working hypothesis that physical fields could be a useful metaphor to study word and sentence meaning is an option but our current representations are incomplete in this respect.For a starter, consider that an RBF kernel has the capacity to generate a potential surface and hence create the impression of gravity, providing one with distance-based decay of interaction strength, plus a scalar scaling factor for the interaction, but of course no term masses. We are working on an experiment design to change that. Therefore, with certain mechanisms in neural networks that could host such quasi-physical fields, a novel approach to the modeling of mind content seems plausible, subject to scrutiny.Work in progress in another direction of the same idea indicates that by using certain algorithms, already emerged vs. still emerging content is clearly distinguishable, in line with Aristotle’s Metaphysics. The implications are that a model completed by “term mass” or “term charge” would enable the computation of the specific work equivalent of sentences or documents, and that via replacing semantics by other modalities, vector fields of more general symbolic content could exist as well. Also, the perceived hypersurface generated by the dynamics of language use may be a step toward more advanced models, for example addressing the Hamiltonian of expanding semantic systems, or the relationship between reaction paths in quantum chemistry vs. sentence construction by gradient descent.

  • 10.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Konstantinidis, Konstantinos
    Papadopoulos, Symeon
    Kontopoulos, Efstratios
    A Physical Metaphor to Study Semantic Drift2016In: Proceedings of SuCCESS-16, 1st International Workshop on Semantic Change & Evolving Semantics, 2016, Vol. 1695Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In accessibility tests for digital preservation, over time we experience drifts of localized and labelled content in statistical models of evolving semantics represented as a vector field. This articulates the need to detect, measure, interpret and model outcomes of knowledge dynamics. To this end we employ a high-performance machine learning algorithm for the training of extremely large emergent self-organizing maps for exploratory data analysis. The working hypothesis we present here is that the dynamics of semantic drifts can be modeled on a relaxed version of Newtonian mechanics called social mechanics. By using term distances as a measure of semantic relatedness vs. their PageRank values indicating social importance and applied as variable ‘term mass’, gravitation as a metaphor to express changes in the semantic content of a vector field lends a new perspective for experimentation. From ‘term gravitation’ over time, one can compute its generating potential whose fluctuations manifest modifications in pairwise term similarity vs. social importance, thereby updating Osgood’s semantic differential. The dataset examined is the public catalog metadata of Tate Galleries, London.

  • 11.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knitted Light: Space and Emotion2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 158-169Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    designing with heat2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aiming to open a new design space that connects three areas of architectural, interaction and textile design, the knitted structures Furry lines and Groovy squares were designed. By combining conventional textile yarns together with conductive yarns, the result investigates the sensation of warmth through the design of knitted structures. The purpose is to offer a synesthetic experience that correlate the physical and visual perception of space and focuses on tactility as an asset to create interactive architectural environments. The structures were made using different knitting techniques, combining a silver-coated copper yarn and conventional textile yarns. The silver coated copper yarn is used both for heat generating and touch sensing properties. Connected to a microcontroller able to sense and react on small differences in electricity, the textile becomes a touch sensor itself. By offering feed-back to hand touch DESIGNING WITH HEAT DELIA DUMITRESCU ANNA PERSSON by becoming warmly pleasant to the skin, new types of patterns can be created using the combination between heat and human touch that exceed the visual dimension. Designing with heat exemplifies how visible and invisible expressions merge into one experience, expressed through the textile material. The textile structure is perceived both through the eyes of imagination and the skin as heated patterns. The prototypes show how heat could be part of the surface aesthetics alongside with colour and shape.

  • 13.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Touching Loops2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Touching Loops is a collection of three knitted textiles with structure-changing interactive properties. The textiles are able to sense and react to touch by shrinking, breaking or becoming stiff. The textiles are thought of as interactive architectural material. When they are touched, a specific area in the textile becomes hot. A microcontroller that is connected to the textile is programmed to sense and react to touch. The materials in the samples react to heat in different ways by shrinking, becoming stiff or by breaking into pieces. The developing process consisted in programming the patterns for industrial machines in such a way that the conductive silver yarns are of important matter for the material aesthetics besides their function to generate heat. The three knitted pieces react in different ways when current passes trough the conductive yarns. The first piece combines a silver coated copper yarn and Pemotex yarn in a ridge pattern. In the second sample a Jaquard pattern combines shrinking polyester monofilament, a Grilon yarn and a silver coated copper yarn. This piece reacts to heat by breaking and shrinking. The third piece is constructed with partial knitting and ridge patterns and the yarns used are Pemotex, a Grilon yarn and the silver coated copper yarn. When the conductive yarn gets hot, the ridges shrink and harden. The aim of the project is to explore possibilities for expressive interactive tactile knitted materials and structures. The textiles are seen as a possible material to use in the context of architecture.

  • 14.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Stretch & Squeeze2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A computer mouse is a generic interaction tool designed for navigating graphical elements on a two dimensional plane. It is developed in a context of technology and formed to serve the ergonomics of the desktop work situation. A textile mouse, on the other hand, engages a different context. The textile alone evokes the traditions of clothes and home décor that will inevitably influence how it is perceived and consequently used.

  • 15.
    Eson Bodin, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandvik, Folke
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Cullus: from idea to patent2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 30-51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Gao, Shi Chao
    et al.
    Tsinghua University.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Zhao, Li
    Jiang, Wen Jun
    Data-driven estimation of blood pressure using photoplethysmographic signals2016In: Proceedings of EMBC-16, 38th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noninvasive measurement of blood pressure by optical methods receives considerable interest, but the complexity of the measurement and the difficulty of adjusting parameters restrict applications. We develop a method for estimating the systolic and diastolic blood pressure using a single-point optical recording of a photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal. The estimation is data-driven, we use automated machine learning algorithms instead of mathematical models. Combining supervised learning with a discrete wavelet transform, the method is insensitive to minor irregularities in the PPG waveform, hence both pulse oximeters and smartphone cameras can record the signal. We evaluate the accuracy of the estimation on 78 samples from 65 subjects (40 male, 25 female, age 29±7) with no history of cardiovascular disease. The estimate for systolic blood pressure has a mean error 4.9±4.9 mm Hg, and 4.3±3.7 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure when using the oximeter-obtained PPG. The same values are 5.1±4.3 mm Hg and 4.6±4.3 mm Hg when using the phone-obtained PPG, comparing with A&D UA-767PBT result as gold standard. The simplicity of the method encourages ambulatory measurement, and given the ease of sharing the measured data, we expect a shift to data-oriented approaches deriving insight from ubiquitous mobile devices that will yield more accurate machine learning models in monitoring blood pressure.

  • 17.
    Garrote Jurado, Ramon
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    The use of a Learning Management System to promote group interaction and socialization in a trainee project: Unemployed Academics on their way to new jobs2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The project is a cooperation between University College of Borås (UB), local Unemployment Agency and European Social Fund. The purpose of the project is to offer practice to unemployed academics at UB, let them develop themselves and find a new job. After 5 months 11of 30 participants have got a job. The project uses a Learning Management System (LMS) to promote group interaction and socialization. An analysis of the use of online asynchronous discussion (OAD) within the LMS has been made and presented in this paper. The purpose of this analysis is to study the group interaction and socialization.

  • 18.
    Garrote Jurado, Ramon
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Pettersson, Tomas
    Christie, Michael F
    Lärares attityder till användningen av lärplattformar i högre utbildning2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes among lecturers and find out if there was a resistance that could be an obstacle to an increased use of LMS (Learning management systems) in the higher education. At the University College of Boras 22 lecturers were interviewed, the sample consisted of lecturers that had the opportunity to use WebCT during the last 9 months. The answers show that most of the lecturers, including those who only used minor parts of the LMS, believed that they could benefit from using a LMS in the future. The study did not support the hypothesis that fear of the complexity of the system or unwanted effects on the education is a main reason for lecturers not to use LMS, when lecturers decide individually to use tools in the systems, the major concern is the initial amount of work compared with the expected benefits. Due to the benefits of a fully implemented LMS and the result of this study it is recommended that institutions in higher education take actions to establish LMS as a standard tool, and the handling a part of the professional competence of the lecturers.

  • 19.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Design of a Garments-Based Sensing System for Breathing Monitoring2013In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 85, no No 5, 499-509 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The long-term monitoring of biophysiological signals requires new types of sensor systems that are wearable and at the same time convenient for the users. This paper describes the design of a novel garment-based sensing system for the long-term monitoring of breathing rhythm. The system concept was realized in a prototype garment, integrated with coated piezoresistive sensors. The prototype garment was tested by five subjects, and compared with a standard piezoelectric respiratory belt. Each signal was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated in the time and frequency domain to make sure that no medical and diagnostic information was lost. The results showed a good agreement between the garment-based sensors and the standard reference, where errors occurred only when the breathing rate was extremely high. The garment-based sensor system could also distinguish the predominance breathing compartment (chest versus abdominal breathing). The system could detect a 10 s pause in breathing, which could be of importance in studies of sleep apnea. A garment-based sensing system maintains the accuracy of the signal quality without reducing the comfort for the user. It makes possible long-term ambulatory monitoring and has home-based healthcare applications.

  • 20.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    textile interaction design2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 104-115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hjort, Klas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Improved Returns Information System to facilitate Gatekeeping and Returns Avoidance2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Jamil, Eva
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Shirazi, Mazdak
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Spelar behörighetskrav någon roll?: En kvantitativ studie av Android användares beteende och förståelse2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem – Android is the leading operative system on the market, while previous studies have shown that malware and attacks have mostly been targeted at Android units. Attacks are executed when applications that consist malware gets access of the permissions they demand of the unit. This is by the approval of the user before an installation of an application. A problem is that many users ignores or don’t understand the permission they give applications access to.

    Purpose - The study aims to examine three issues. The first research question contains hypotheses about how aware Android users are of the risks which ten application permissions contain. These permissions often occurs among malicious applications but are also included among safe applications at Google Play. Furthermore, the objective of this study is to investigate whether there is a connection between the user awareness and their downloading behavior. The last issue examines whether users read through the application permissions before installing an application, and what possible reasons that causes them to not read the permissions.

    Methodology - Quantitative methods have been used by gathering the empirical material through a questionnaire. The study involved 116 respondents and the results were created by using bar graphs, crosstabs, Chi-square tests and frequency tables.

    Results and Conclusion - The goal has been met to a large extent, however, it would have been beneficial to have a larger selection to possibly be able to ensure and strengthen the significance of the Chi-square tests. The result showed that a high degree of users are not aware of the risks of the investigated permissions. Further findings showed that there is some connection between the user’s awareness and download behavior, since six out of ten hypotheses got confirmed. The results also showed that 62 percent of the users never alternatively rarely read permissions before installation. The reason for this is that they don’t understand the permissions associated description, alternatively don’t notice the permissions at all. Finally, the respondents indicated that they do not understand the description of the permissions because they are too short and have too many technical terms.

    Originality - The results of the study mainly benefits the Android users since it increases their knowledge which protects them against the risks. The result, however, also benefit the further development of the application permissions, to make them work more effectively as a warning method. What’s new and valuable in the study is that it’s based on the problems that was identified in previous research and we decided to further immerse ourselves in the subject. The study has investigated whether there is a connection between the user awareness and downloading behavior, as well as the background causes which makes the users ignore and don’t understand the permissions. Originality is also found in the study since we limited ourselves to specifically investigate ten permissions that often occur among malicious applications. The study is written in Swedish.

  • 23.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Light Textiles2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 52-63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Light textiles Is a research work which focuses on the development of light textiles based on the integration of optical fibres into textile structures. The aim is to create textile light designs which offer big light surfaces that have an even all over and strong light effect. Finally they could be used as big movable light screens in a space either private or public.

  • 24.
    Jul, Lene
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Adding Values2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 146-157Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kontopoulos, E.
    et al.
    CERTH.
    Corubolo, F.
    University of Liverpool.
    Eggers, A.
    University of Göttingen.
    Ludwig, J.
    University of Göttingen.
    Wieder, P.
    GWDG - Gesellschaft für wissenschaftliche Datenverarbeitung mbH Göttingen.
    Hedges, M.
    King's College London.
    Waddington, S.
    King's College London.
    Chanod, J-P.
    Xerox European Research Centre.
    Vion-Dury, J-Y.
    Xerox European Research Centre.
    Hasan, A.
    University of Liverpool.
    Watry, P.
    University of Liverpool.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Pinchuk, R.
    SpaceApps.
    Laurenson, P.
    Tate.
    Mueller, C.
    B.USOC.
    Spyroglou, O.
    Dotsoft.
    Kompatsiaris, i.
    CERTH.
    PERICLES EU Integrated Project: Research Strategy and First Results2015In: Proceedings of EU Project Networking Session, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26. Kontopoulos, Efstratios
    et al.
    Moysiadis, Theodoros
    Tsagiopoulou, Maria
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Papakonstantinou, Nikos
    Ntoufa, Stavroula
    Meditskos, Georgios
    Stamatopoulos, Kostas
    Kompatsiaris, Ioannis
    Studying the Cohesion Evolution of Genes Related to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Using Semantic Similarity in Gene Ontology and Self-Organizing Maps2016In: Proceedings of SWAT4LS-16, 9th International Conference on Semantic Web Applications and Tools for Life Sciences, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant body of work on biomedical text mining is aimed at uncovering meaningful associations between biological entities, including genes. This has the potential to offer new insights for research, uncovering hidden links between genes involved in critical pathways and processes. Recently, high-throughput studies have started to unravel the genetic landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common adult leukemia. CLL displays remarkable clinical heterogeneity, likely reflecting its underlying biological heterogeneity which, despite all progress, still remains insufficiently characterized and understood. This paper deploys an ontology-based semantic similarity combined with self-organizing maps for studying the temporal evolution of cohesion among CLL-related genes and the extracted information. Three consecutive time periods are considered and groups of genes are derived therein. Our preliminary results indicated that our proposed gene groupings are meaningful and that the temporal dimension indeed impacted the gene cohesion, leaving a lot of room for further promising investigations.

  • 27.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A Wall Hanging as an Organic Interface2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are developing a dynamic textile wall hanging as an interface to the atmosphere of a room. Atmospheres are elusive. An atmosphere is the result of an ongoing negotiation between the activities in the room and the expression of the material objects, the lighting, the temperature, and the boundaries of the room [4, 8]. The wall hanging will play an active part in that ongoing negotiation. The activities in the room will influence how the textile wall hanging changes structure, form, color, as well as the pace with which it happens, and the activities in the room may in turn be influenced by the expression of the wall hanging.

  • 28.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The burning tablecloth2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imagine that the table is set and dinner is ready. It’s time to sit down and share the moment. That is what we do also in terms of sharing a one time pattern change in the tablecloth, and in terms of sharing each others’ mobile phone activity. Incoming phone calls and messages are not notified by the phones themselves, but through a burned out pattern in the tablecloth, in between our plates. The Burning Tablecloth serves as a design example of the design technique for irreversible patterns, expressing colour and structure-changes in a knitted textile. The Burning Tablecloth changes colour and structure according to mobile phone signals (calls and text messages) with burned out patterns and acts as a medium for raising questions about interactive tactile and visual expressions in textiles. The project is a design example of research into three fields, knitted circuits, textile patterns and peoples’ relation to computational technology. The tablecloth is knitted with cotton yarns and a heating wire in a Stoll flatbed knitting machine. The pattern that appears when using the tablecloth is built up as squares with the potential of becoming chess-patterned over the whole tablecloth surface. The table-cloth is connected to a microcontroller and various electronic components. The heating wire knitted in the table-cloth is the active material; when heated it is able to change the colour and structure of the table-cloth. The burning tablecloth reacts to mobile phone signals by getting warm so that colour and eventually structure changes is appearing in the tablecloth. The experiment demonstrates a design example where visual and tactile interactive properties are expressed in a tablecloth by mobile phone signals. Combined in a material structure, textile circuits are controlled by external stimuli adding an aesthetical value to the textile expression. With a foundation of experienced knowledge from latter experiments, the tablecloth shows an example developed by the design technique for irreversible patterns. The Burning Tablecloth also demonstrates how information can be expressed in an esthetical way through textiles, acting as an interactive colour and structure changing ambient textile display.

  • 29.
    Ledendal, Marie
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ocean and Sea: design with chromatic smart materials2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 10-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lindh, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    As a Utility – Metaphors of Information Technologies2016In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 13, no 2, 47-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on conceptual metaphor theory, this article investigates and argues the importance of the utility metaphor in discussions shaping information technologies. The results reveal that the utility metaphor has been evoked in different shapes and forms continually since the late fifties relating, for example, to concepts such as Time-sharing, Computer networks, The computer grid, Utility computing, and – the contemporary metaphor – Cloud computing.

  • 31.
    Lund, Anja
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nanotechnology for textile applications: or how to make something from nothing2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 116-125Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Malec, S.
    et al.
    University of Texas (Austin).
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Widdows, D.
    Microsoft Bing.
    Cohen, T.
    University of Texas (Austin).
    Landing Propp in Interaction Space: First Steps Toward Scalable Open Domain Narrative Analysis With Predication-based Semantic Indexing2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of applying high-dimensionalvector representations of concept-relation-concept triplets, which have been successfullyapplied to model a small set of relationship types in the biomedicaldomain, to the task of modeling folk tales. In doing so, our ultimate aim is todevelop representations of narratives through which their underlying structurecan be compared. The current paper describes our progress toward this aim, withemphasis on addressing the technical challenges involved in moving from therelatively constrained set of relations that have been extracted from biomedicaltext to the much larger set of unnormalized relations that have been extractedfrom the open domain. A toy example using graded vectors demonstrates that ourapproach will be feasible once more material will be added to the test collection.

  • 33. Meroño Peñuela, Albert
    et al.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Visualizing the Drift of Linked Open Data Using Self-Organizing Maps2016In: Proceedings of Drift-a-LOD Workshop at the 20th International Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Knowledge Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urge for evolving the Web into a globally shared dataspace has turned the Linked Open Data (LOD) cloud into a massive platform containing 100 billion machine-readable statements. Several factors hamper a historical study of the evolution of the LOD cloud, and hence forecasting its future: its ever-growing scale, which makes a global analysis difficult; its Web-distributed nature, which challenges the analysis of its data; and the scarcity of regular and time-stamped archival dumps. Recently, a scalable implementation of self-organizing maps (SOM) has been developed to visualize the local topology of high-dimensional data. We use this methodology to address scalability issues, and the Dynamic Linked Data Observatory, a regular biweekly, centralized sample of the LOD cloud, as a time-stamped collection. We visualize the drift of Linked Datasets between 2012 and 2016, finding that datasets with high availability, high vocabulary reuse, and modeling with commonly used terms in the LOD cloud are better traceable across time.

  • 34.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Professional impact2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35. Oscarsson, Linda
    et al.
    Jacobsen Heimdahl, Elisabeth
    Lundell, Torbjörn
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Flat knitting of a light emitting textile with optical fibres2009In: AUTEX Research Journal, ISSN 1470-9589, E-ISSN 2300-0929, Vol. 9, no 2, 61-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitted products have a flexibility that offers many attractive possibilities. Combined with technical fibres, this gives interesting and innovative possibilities. Many technical fibres and yarns has however properties such as high stiffness and brittleness which are difficult to process in the practice of weft knitting. This paper is about the experimental product development of a light radiating textile lamp in which optical fibres are used as the only illumination source. The lampshade is produced on an electronic flat knitting machine with special equipment suitable for the feeding of yarn with high stiffness. The work was divided in two parts: exploring the possibilities to knit the desired shape on one hand and experimenting about knitting with optical fibres as a weft insertion on the other hand. The method is an inductive approach; a literature survey, information from suppliers of knitting production equipment and experimental work on a flat knitting machine at The Swedish School of Textiles, Borås, Sweden. Results show that the diamond shaped structure can be knitted in one piece with transparent monofilament yarns. Furthermore it also shows that difficulties occur when knitting with stiff and brittle optical fibres therefore the paper ends with a discussion with suggestions of how to overcome these challenges.

  • 36.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile Circuits and Patterns: Designing dynamic and irreversible textile patterns using a non-chemical burn-out technique2008Other (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A design technique for irreversible patterns2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new design technique for irreversible textile patterns has been developed. This technique can be compared with commonly used burn-out techniques (Ausbrenner etc.), but without using chemicals. Kanthal, a highly resistant heating wire, was knitted together with a blend of “conventional” textile yarns like cotton, wool, polyester and viscose into twelve different textile samples. In the samples, about five courses of heating wire were embroidered into parallel connections with a copper yarn. The textile samples were put on wooden frames and connected to a power supply. As the heating wires get hot, burned out patterns appear. The material combinations react to heat in different ways and the grade of expression varies in the samples. Some materials melt, others become dark/burned and some vanish or burn very quickly. The burned out expression depends on a range of factors such as the textile construction, access to oxygen, yarn combinations, length and number of heating wires used for the parallel connections, power supply etc. Being able to design a textile material by incorporating heat directly into the textile construction is considered as a new design technique for burned out patterns. By this technique, colour and structure changes in the material can be affected to create an aesthetic expression designing holes, stripes or cuts etc. The design technique enables a novel way of decorating a textile after a fabric is produced. It would be possible use this technique for showing information through colour- and structure changes in the textile using it as an ambient textile display. Technique: knitting, embroidery Materials: Kanthal, Kevlar, cotton, wool, polyester, viscose

  • 38.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Designing dynamic and irreversible textile patterns, using a non-chemical burn-out (ausbrenner) technique2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 64-87Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this ongoing practise-based design research project, a new technique for designing textile patterns is developed and explored; a non chemical burn-out (ausbrenner) technique. As a first part of the project, experiments with conductive and traditional textile materials in knitted structures were designed. The knitted samples were made in cotton, wool, viscose, polyester and Kevlar (Kevlar 2008), and have all been combined with Kanthal heating wires (Kanthal 2008). When a voltage is applied to the textile, the heating wire leaves burned out patterns in the textile material. The result is a new technique, where we can design irreversible textile patterns. We also suggest new design variables of relevance when designing dynamic textile patterns. The overall aim is to explore different materials, material combinations and techniques for developing textile circuits and designing dynamic textile patterns. The knitted textile patterns change over time when a voltage is turned on or off in the textile circuits.

  • 39.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Flat knitting of optical fibres2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an experimental research in the areas of knitting technology and optical fibres. The aim is to explore the possibilities to knit stiff monofilament optical fibres in flat knitting machines. The yarns used were transparent monofilament of polyester and optical fibres of PMMA (Polymethyl Metacrylate). Result shows that a hexagon shaped flat knitted prototype can be produced but also difficulties to knit monofilament yarn with optical fibres. The optical fibres was put into the structure in straight angles as weft insertion, to avoid bending and breakage of the monofilaments. Another problem was the take down device on the knitting machine but a solution of this is presented in the paper.

  • 40.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Bratt, Magnus
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Smart textiles for knitted products: Prototype factory2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a concept of collaboration between industry, university and research institutes in the area of Smart Textiles in Sweden. The concept idea of a laboratory and Prototype Factory at The Swedish School of Textiles for development of Smart Textiles in knitting is presented. The result presented shows a concept where Smart Textiles can be developed and knitted in a prototype factory and a development laboratory. Companies, researchers and others with product ideas in the area of Smart Textiles can here get a first prototype and help to continue to make a ready made product for the market.

  • 41.
    Player-Koro, Catarina
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Hype, hope and ICT in Teacher Education. A Bernsteinian perspective.2013In: Learning, Media & Technology, ISSN 1743-9884, E-ISSN 1743-9892, Vol. 38, no 1, 26-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws from ethnographic data produced inside mathematics teacher education in Sweden. It explores and makes visible the ongoing process of education during workshops in information and communication technology (ICT) laboratory contexts in which student teachers were working with spreadsheet applications on the computer. The main finding is that, contrary to the intentions to renew and revitalise education, ICT in use seemed to operate as a relay in the reproduction of traditional ways of teaching and learning. However, the investigation is not one of the failures of education to make use of ICT but one that tries to distance itself from the traditional enthusiastic rhetoric, with the ambition to contribute to a more realistic discussion. Bernstein's concept of pedagogical discourse has been used. One education setting has been studied in detail.

  • 42.
    Player-Koro, Catarina
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Hype, Hope and Reality, the paradox of ICT in education2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For 30 years there has been ongoing argument that developments of information and communication technology (ICT) will inevitably change education systems and practices. This innovation of education by using ICT-tools is often described as more or less self-evident with a naïve faith in the promises of new technology to enable teachers to make improvement in the content, the methods and the organisation of teaching and learning, with far-reaching influence on students’ skills and knowledge (Westera 2005; Nivala 2009). One example is ICT literacy defined as an important component in a set of generic skills that all citizens in the neo-liberal market society must possess (Kozma and Voogt 2003; Krumsvik 2009; Robertson 2003; De Castell, Bryson, and Jenson 2002). However, educational practices seem to have failed to live up to these utopian expectations and the process of integration of ICT has often been described as slow. Reasons for this lethargy has by many researchers been identified in various aspects of educational practice ranging from technical factors such as lack of technology and software in schools and the limited personal expertise of teachers in the use of ICT, to other factors, such as for example teachers’ beliefs, and knowledge about how to integrate ICT in teaching (Robertson 2003; UNESCO Launches ICT Standards Effort 2008; De Castell, Bryson, and Jenson 2002; Goktas, Yildirim, and Yildirim 2009; Govender and Govender 2009). The aim with this paper is to discuss how ethnographic methods can be used to make visible what educational technologies might offer for teaching and learning of mathematics. The paper offers critical considerations of the official discourse (described above), stemming from economic interests, exhorting the field of education to adopt and integrate information and communication technology (ICT), in teaching and learning. It calls for an alternative, reflexive and critical approach where questions about technology uses in education are emphasised. But the question is, what educationally, does ICT really offer for education? In the present study a group of student teachers were followed during 20 weeks of a mathematics course as part of a three and a half to four yearlong education. The course was followed in its entirely but the material discussed here represents participants observation together with conversional interviews with students from lab work where student teachers work with computers . One way of understanding the attractiveness of ICT for educational policy makers, is the way new technology is formulated in official discourse, by the society and its selected agents, where digital technology in many way defines society, and the position education has as a driving force of economic competiveness (Ball 2006). The argument for ICT use in education formulated in this discourse is rooted in economistic theorizing rather than in an educational theory (De Castell, Bryson, and Jenson 2002). The present study try to redress this imbalances. It uses Basil Bernstein conceptual framework about the construction of pedagogic discourse as a grammar underlying fields of production, recontextualisation and pedagogical practice. These theoretical concepts could be used to understand the process where dominant groups in society ideologically create unrealistic expectations about the effects of ICT use on teaching and learning. It does this through its concern with the intrinsic feature of pedagogic discourse, with the distinctive form and structure of what actually goes on the process of education (Bernstein 2000).

  • 43.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Candefjord, Stefan
    Andersson, Robert
    Carlborg, Niklas
    Szakal, Adam
    Westlund, Johannes
    Rundqvist, Karin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sjöqvist, Bengt Arne
    Total body movement monitoring using a regular smartphone carried in a smart textile tight shirt2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44. Toftegaard, Ola
    Textile for the future2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p.88-93Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sokoler, Tomas
    A Material Strategy: Exploring Material Properties of Computers2010In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 4, no 3, 1-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As design problems are inherently indeterminate or wicked, we have to rely on various strategies when practicing design. In this paper, we propose a material strategy that emphasizes the expressional potential of computers. We argue how computers, in principle, can be understood as a material for design and how they can be part of a formgiving practice. We embark on the beginning of establishing a practical understanding of the computer as a material by articulating a number of material properties of computers. Two of these properties, computed causality and connectability, are given shape through material samples of a computational composite. The composite is in the form of a copper tile of which the computer controls the thermodynamic behavior. The material strategy proposed here which produced dramatic results is still in its infancy, but by adopting a material understanding of computers and beginning to embody the space of opportunities it unfolds, we take the first steps towards a new way of designing computational objects and architectures.

  • 46.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sokoler, Tomas
    Material Computing: Computational Materials2010In: Ubicomp '10 The 2010 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing, ACM , 2010, 383-384 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedding computers into our environment is perhaps not only a job for computer scientist and engineers. We propose to understand the computer as a material for design as means to invite artists, architect, and designers to participate in envisioning how and where the computational power can be used. We will invite the conference attendees to (once again) think about how to bridge the so-called gap between computational and material properties but this time using a material rather than the traditional information centric perspective. The invitation is extended through hands-on experiences with our two samples of computational composites.

  • 47.
    Waddington, Simon
    et al.
    King's College London, UK.
    Hedges, Mark
    King's College London, UK.
    Riga, Marina
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Mitzias, Panagiotis
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Kontopoulos, Efstratios
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Kompatsiaris, Ioannis
    CERTH, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Vion-Dury, Jean-Yves
    XRCE, Grenoble, France.
    Lagos, Nikolaos
    XRCE, Grenoble, France.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Corubolo, Fabio
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Muller, Christian
    BUSOC, Belgium.
    McNeill, John
    Tate Galleries, London, UK.
    PERICLES – Digital Preservation through Management of Change in Evolving Ecosystems.2016In: The Success of European Projects Using New Information and Communication Technologies / [ed] Hamriouni, S., Setubal, Portugal, 2016, 51-74 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Management of change is essential to ensure the long-term reusabilityof digital assets. Change can be brought about in many ways, includingthrough technological, user community and policy factors. Motivated by casestudies in space science and time-based media, we consider the impact ofchange on complex digital objects comprising multiple interdependent entities,such as files, software and documentation. Our approach is based on modellingof digital ecosystems, in which abstract representations are used to assess risksto sustainability and support tasks such as appraisal. The paper is based onwork of the EU FP7 PERICLES project on digital preservation, and presentssome general concepts as well as a description of selected research areas underinvestigation by the project.

  • 48. Walkenström, Pernilla
    et al.
    Thorvaldsson, Anna
    Electrospinning of nanofibers for biomedical applications2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 22-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Wilhelmsson, Kenneth
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Automatic Question Generation from Swedish Documents as a Tool for Information Extraction2011In: Proceedings of the 18th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics NODALIDA 2011 / [ed] Bolette Sandford Pedersen, Gunta Nešpore, Inguna Skadiņa, 2011, 323-326 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An implementation of automatic question generation (QG) from raw Swedish text is presented. QG is here chosen as an alternative to natural query systems where any query can be posed and no indication is given of whether the current text database includes the information sought for. The program builds on parsing with grammatical functions from which corresponding questions are generated and it incorporates the article database of Swedish Wikipedia. The pilot system is meant to work with a text shown in the GUI and auto-completes user input to help find available questions. The act of question generation is here described together with early test results regarding the current produced questions.

  • 50.
    Wilhelmsson, Kenneth
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Automatisk generering av frågor som svensk text besvarar: ett informationssystem2010In: Röster från Humanisten 2010Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vilken information kan en text sägas innehålla? Ett enkelt svar är ”de frågor som den besvarar.” I vilken grad går det i så fall att automatiskt generera dessa frågor och därmed programmera ett frågebesvarande informationssystem för svensk text? Ett prototypsystem för denna uppgift har skapats som en del av ett avhandlingsprojekt inom språkteknologi. Det vore till exempel möjligt att vidareutveckla det system som här visas till en allmän teknisk tjänst, t.ex. webbaserad, som ger användare möjlighet att söka efter information med naturligt språk i en valfri digital text. Denna text tar upp de allmänna förutsättningarna för automatisk generering av de frågor som en svensk text besvarar. Själva den teoretiska uppgiften har egenskaper som kan sägas vara lingvistiska eller informationsteoretiska. För att skapa det program som här beskrivs har dessutom naturligtvis en programmeringsinsats krävts, men denna kommer inte att tas upp här, den rent praktiska sidan av uppgiften är möjlig att lösa på många sätt.

12 1 - 50 of 60
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf