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Social capital among healthcare professionals: A prospective study of its importance for job satisfaction, work engagement and engagement in clinical improvements.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Social capital can be an important resource to facilitate the needed improvements in quality of care and efficiency in hospitals.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the importance of social capital (recognition, vertical trust, horizontal trust and reciprocity) for job satisfaction, work engagement and engagement in clinical improvements.

DESIGN: A prospective cohort design was used.

SETTINGS: Intensive care units and emergency, surgical and medical units at five Swedish hospitals with ongoing development of their processes of care.

PARTICIPANTS: Healthcare professionals (physicians, registered nurses, assistant nurses) at five Swedish midsize hospitals.

METHODS: The participants answered a questionnaire at two occasions, NN=1602 at baseline and NN=1548 at one-year follow-up. Mean hospital response rate was 53% at baseline and 59% at follow-up. Univariate, multivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed, and the prospective analysis was based on 477 respondents.

RESULTS: Social capital was associated with healthcare professionals' general work engagement and job satisfaction. Analysis showed positive associations between all measured aspects of social capital and engagement in clinical improvements of patient safety and quality of care. The prospective analysis showed that increased social capital predicted increased job satisfaction, work engagement and engagement in clinical improvements of patient safety.

CONCLUSION: Social capital is strongly related to job satisfaction and active engagement with clinical improvements. The findings contribute to a deeper knowledge of social capital as a predictive factor that influences patient safety and health among healthcare staff.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 53
National Category
Nursing Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8592DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2015.07.012PubMedID: 26315780Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84955377066OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8592DiVA: diva2:894693
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
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  • de-DE
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