Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
How the context of ambulance care influences learning to become a specialist ambulance nurse a Swedish perspective.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Ambulance emergency care is multifaceted with extraordinary challenges to implement accurate assessment and care. A clinical learning environment providing opportunities for mastering these essential skills is a key component in ensuring that prehospital emergency nurse (PEN) students acquire the necessary clinical competence.

AIM: The aim is to understand how PEN students experience their clinically based training, focusing on their learning process.

METHOD: We applied content analysis with its qualitative method to our material that consisted of three reflections each by 28 PEN students over their learning process during their 8weeks of clinical ambulance practice. The research was carried out at the Center for Prehospital Care, University of Borås, Sweden.

RESULTS: The broad spectrum of ambulance assignments seems to awaken great uncertainty and excessive respect in the students. Student vulnerability appears to decrease when the clinical supervisor behaves calmly, knowledgeably, confidently and reflectively. Early traumatic incidents on the other hand may increase the students' anxiety. Each student is offered a unique opportunity to learn how to approach patients and relatives in their own environments, and likewise an opportunity to gather information for assessment. Infrequency of missions seems to make PEN students less active in their student role, thereby preventing them from availing themselves of potential learning situations. Fatigue and hunger due to lack of breaks or long periods of transportation also inhibit learning mode.

CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest the need for appraisal of the significance of the clinical supervisor, the ambulance environment, and student vulnerability. The broad spectrum of conditions in combination with infrequent assignments make simulation necessary. However, the unique possibilities provided for meeting patients and relatives in their own environments offer the PEN student excellent opportunities for learning how to make assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
Keyword [en]
Ambulances, Clinical competence, Emergency medical service, Learning, Students, Nursing
National Category
Learning Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8465DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2015.10.029PubMedID: 26596850Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84947333227OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8465DiVA: diva2:893610
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2017-05-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Axelsson, ChristerBång, Angela
By organisation
Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare
In the same journal
Nurse Education Today
LearningMedical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 98 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf