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Inequalities in maintenance of health and performance between young adult women and men in higher education
[external].
2009 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 19, no 2, 168-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Because of ageing populations, most high-income countries are facing an imminent scarcity of labour. Maintenance of health and performance in young adults therefore becomes a crucial prerequisite for sustainable societies. One major obstruction to this accomplishment is the striking health inequalities between young women and young men. Previously these inequalities have mainly been studied in a cross-sectional way, focusing on ill-health. In this study, we compared the prevalence of maintained health and performance between young adult women and men and the predictors for this outcome. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1266 participants from a homogenous sample of university students in Sweden. A combined assessment of self-rated ‘very good’ health and un-impaired performance took place at three time points (i.e. maintained health and performance). Potential predictors covered stable conditions in health-related behaviours, conditions at work/school and work-home interference. Results: Young women had less maintained health and performance than young men. No major differences in predictors were found. However, there was a tendency for psychosocial factors to be the most important predictors, especially in women. Conclusions: That young women had less maintained health and performance in a homogenous sample beyond well-known differentiating factors suggests explanations other than observable structural differences between the sexes. This was also indicated by the importance attached to perceived demands, and work-home interference, especially in women. The combination of less scheduled, and more unscheduled, schoolwork (i.e. time-flexibility) negatively affected the maintenance of health and performance in our study population, suggesting a focus for future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press , 2009. Vol. 19, no 2, 168-174 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8159DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckn131Local ID: 2320/10023OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8159DiVA: diva2:889042
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22

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Dellve, Lotta
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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