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Impact of diagnosis and sex on long-term prognosis in acute coronary syndromes.
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2007 (English)In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 157, no 3, 482-488 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is limited information on long-term outcome in patients surviving the acute phase of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). As yet, the effects of the type of syndrome and sex on mortality and morbidity in the long run have not been well described. METHODS: We studied 1618 patients <80 years old with ACS and alive 30 days after hospitalization in a coronary care unit. The patients were followed for 5 years. They were divided into 4 groups according to the type of ACS (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI], non-STEMI, unstable angina pectoris high risk, and unstable angina pectoris low risk). RESULTS: There was no significant sex difference in unadjusted 5-year mortality (P = .20). After adjustment for age, the hazard ratio with the corresponding 95% CI for a higher late 5-year mortality in women in relation to men was 0.89 (0.70-1.13, P = .34). Women were hospitalized for heart failure significantly more frequently during follow-up, a significance that disappeared after adjustment for age. Non-STEMI was associated with a significantly higher long-term mortality than STEMI, before but not after adjustment for covariates (hazard ratio [95% CI] 1.02 [0.75-1.37], P = .92). Of these, age, ST depression on admission, and early revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention appeared to be of particular importance. Non-STEMI had a significantly higher rate of acute/subacute revascularization during follow-up, even after adjustment for age. CONCLUSIONS: Before, but not after, adjustment for covariates, a diagnosis of non-STEMI was associated with a poorer prognosis than other types of ACS. Small sex differences in long-term outcome in survivors of ACS were found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mosby, Inc. , 2007. Vol. 157, no 3, 482-488 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8089DOI: 10.1016/j.ahj.2007.05.015Local ID: 2320/8996OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8089DiVA: diva2:888972
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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