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Characteristics and outcome amongst young adults suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation is attempted.
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2006 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 260, no 5, 435-441 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Amongst patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, young adults represent a minority. However, these victims suffer from the catastrophe when they are in a very active phase of life and have a long life expectancy. This survey aims to describe young adults in Sweden who suffer from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is attempted in terms of characteristics and outcome. DESIGN: Prospective and descriptive design. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Young adults (18-35 years) who suffered from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in whom CPR was attempted and who were included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry between 1990 and 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival to 1 month. RESULTS: In all, 1105 young adults (3.1% of all the patients in the registry) were included, of which 29% were females, 51% were nonwitnessed and 15% had a cardiac aetiology. Only 17% were found in ventricular fibrillation, 53% received bystander CPR. The overall survival to 1 month was 6.3%. High survival was found amongst patients found in ventricular fibrillation (20.8%) and those with a cardiac aetiology (14.8%). Ventricular fibrillation at the arrival of the rescue team remained an independent predictor of an increased chance of survival (odds ratio: 7.43; 95% confidence interval: 3.44-16.65). CONCLUSION: Amongst young adults suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and in whom CPR was attempted, a minority survived to 1 month. Subgroups with a higher survival could be defined (patients found in ventricular fibrillation and patients in whom there was a cardiac aetiology). However, only one independent predictor of an increased chance of survival could be demonstrated, i.e. ventricular fibrillation at the arrival of the rescue team

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. , 2006. Vol. 260, no 5, 435-441 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8065DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2006.01705.xLocal ID: 2320/8975OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8065DiVA: diva2:888948
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22

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Herlitz, Johan
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf