Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Association between interval between call for ambulance and return of spontaneous circulation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
[external].
Show others and affiliations
2006 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 71, no 1, 40-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe the association between the interval between the call for ambulance and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PATIENTS: All patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started, included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry (SCAR) for whom information about the time of calling for an ambulance and the time of ROSC was available. RESULTS: Among 26,192 patients who were included in SCAR and were not witnessed by the ambulance crew, information about the time of call for an ambulance and the time of ROSC was available in 4847 patients (19%). There was a very strong relationship between the interval between call for an ambulance and ROSC and survival to one month. If the interval was less than or equal to 5 min, 47% survived to one month. If the interval exceeded 30 min, only 5% (n = 35) survived to one month. The vast majority of the latter survivors had a shockable rhythm either on admission of the rescue team or at some time during resuscitation. CONCLUSION: Among patients who have ROSC after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, there is a very strong association between the interval between the call for ambulance and ROSC and survival to one month. However, even if this delay is very long (> 30 min after calling for an ambulance), a small percentage will ultimately survive; they are mainly patients who at some time during resuscitation have a shockable rhythm. The overall percentage of patients for whom CPR continued for more than 30 min who are alive one month later can be assumed to be extremely low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ireland Ltd , 2006. Vol. 71, no 1, 40-46 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8046DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.03.006Local ID: 2320/9063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8046DiVA: diva2:888929
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Herlitz, Johan
In the same journal
Resuscitation
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 36 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf