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Possibilities for, and obstacles to, CPR training among cardiac care patients and their co-habitants.
[external]. (Prehospital akutsjukvård)
2005 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 65, no 3, 337-343 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To investigate the level of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training among cardiac patients and their co-habitants and to describe the possibilities for, and obstacles to, CPR training among this group. METHODS: All patients admitted to a coronary care unit during a four-month period were considered for participation in an interview study. Out of 401 patients, 268 were co-habiting. This study deals with these subjects. RESULTS: According to the answers given by the patients, 46% of the patients and 33% of the co-habitants had attended a CPR course at some time. Among those who had not previously attended a course, 58% were willing to attend, and 60% of the patients whose co-habitant had not received CPR education, wanted him or her to attend a course. The major obstacle to CPR training was the patient's own medical status. The major obstacle to the co-habitant's participation was the patient's doubts concerning their partner's physical ability or willingness to participate. Younger persons were more often willing to undergo training than older persons (p < 0.0001). Of those patients who had previously attended a course or who were willing to undergo training, 72% were prepared to do so together with their co-habitant. A course specially designed for cardiac patients and their relatives was a possible alternative for 75% of those willing to participate together with their co-habitant. CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of the patients did not believe that their co-habitant had taken part in CPR training. More than half of these would like their co-habitant to attend such a course. Seventy-two percent were willing to participate in CPR instruction together with their co-habitant. Major obstacles to CPR training were doubts concerning the co-habitant's willingness or physical ability and their own medical status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ireland Ltd , 2005. Vol. 65, no 3, 337-343 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-8025DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2004.12.015Local ID: 2320/8917OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-8025DiVA: diva2:888908
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Herlitz, Johan

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