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Mortality, risk indicators for death, mode of death and symptoms of angina pectoris during 5 years after coronary artery bypass grafting in men and women
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2000 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 247, no 4, 500-506 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe mortality, risk indicators of death, mode of death and symptoms of angina pectoris during 5 years after coronary artery bypass grafting in women and men. SAMPLE: All patients in western Sweden who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting without concomitant valve surgery and without previously performed coronary artery bypass grafting between June 1988 and June 1991. RESULTS: In all, 2000 patients participated in the evaluation, 381 (19%) of whom were women. Compared to men, who had a 5-year mortality of 13.3%, women had a relative risk of death of 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.8; P = 0.03). Renal dysfunction interacted significantly (P = 0.048) with gender, in that the differences were more marked in patients without renal dysfunction. When adjusting for differences at baseline, the relative risk of death amongst women was 1.0 (95% CL 0.7-1.3). Compared to men, women had an increased risk of in-hospital death and death associated with stroke. However, amongst the patients who died, the place and mode of death appeared to be similar in women and men. Amongst survivors after 5 years, women had more symptoms of angina pectoris than men. CONCLUSION: During 5 years after coronary artery bypass grafting, women had an increased mortality compared to men; renal dysfunction seemed to interact with female gender regarding mortality. Women had a higher risk of in-hospital death and death associated with stroke. However, the adjusted relative risk of death during 5 years was equal in women and men. Amongst survivors, women suffered more from angina pectoris than men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. , 2000. Vol. 247, no 4, 500-506 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-7920DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2796.2000.00645.xLocal ID: 2320/8807OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-7920DiVA: diva2:888802
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-03-22Bibliographically approved

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Herlitz, Johan
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • de-DE
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