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There is a difference in characteristics and outcome between women and men who suffer out of hospital cardiac arrest
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1999 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 40, no 3, 133-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether there is a difference in characteristics and outcome in relation to gender among patients who suffer out of hospital cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: The community of Göteborg. PATIENTS: All patients in the community of Göteborg who suffered out of hospital cardiac arrest between 1980 and 1996, and in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Factors at resuscitation and the proportion of patients being hospitalized and discharged from hospital. P values were corrected for age. RESULTS: The women were older than the men (median of 73 vs. 69 years; P < 0.0001), they received bystander-CPR less frequently (11 vs. 15%; P = 0.003), they were found in ongoing ventricular fibrillation less frequently (28 vs. 44%; P < 0.0001), and their arrests were judged to be of cardiac origin less frequently. In a multivariate analysis considering age, gender, arrest being due to a cardiac etiology, initial arrhythmia and by-stander initiated CPR, female gender appeared as an independent predictor for patients being brought to hospital alive (odds ratio 1.37; P = 0.001) but not for patients being discharged from hospital. CONCLUSION: Among patients who suffer out of hospital cardiac arrest with attempted CPR women differ from men being older, receive bystander CPR less frequently, have a cardiac etiology less frequently and are found in ventricular fibrillation less frequently. Finally female gender is associated with an increased chance of arriving at hospital alive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ireland Ltd , 1999. Vol. 40, no 3, 133-140 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-7890DOI: 10.1016/S0300-9572(99)00022-2Local ID: 2320/8775OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-7890DiVA: diva2:888772
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22

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