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Swedish Patriarchic Communication Patterns
University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of International Sociology Association, 2010, Gothenburg, Sweden, International Sociology Association ISA2010 , 2010Conference paper, (Refereed)
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Although there are many forms of organisation and distribution of power and trust, such as kingdoms, democracies, oligarchies, tyrannies, etc. they all have one common feature: they are patriarchies (Erturk, 2009). Western democracies and kingdoms are developed patriarchies. Sweden is known as developed egalitarian society but the patriarchic order is still in tact. This order has been kept for centuries and it is therefore hard to imagine another. As a first step towards the development of an understanding of a non-patriarchic order we study how communication maintains the patriarchic order. For the purpose, we do discourse analysis of group-decision occasions within Swedish institutions. We find that both women's and men's communicative patterns contribute to the long lasting stance of this order and suggest that an interruption of such communicative habits takes us one step away from patriarchy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Sociology Association ISA2010 , 2010.
Keyword [en]
power, patriarchal order, sociology, negotiation, social interaction
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Bussiness and IT
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-6658Local ID: 2320/10310OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-6658DiVA: diva2:887357
Conference
XVII ISA World Congress of Sociology Sociology on the Move Gothenburg, Sweden 11 - 17 July, 2010
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • vancouver
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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