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Treatment of chronic canalithiasis can be beneficial for patients with vertigo/dizziness and chronic musculoskeletal pain, including whiplash related pain
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Vol. 8, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Background and aim: Chronic musculoskeletal pain, e.g. whiplash associated disorders (WAD), fibromyalgia and myalgia, causes significant burden on both the individual and on society as a whole. In a previous study, the authors concluded that there is a likely connection between chronic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)/canalithiasis and headache, neck pain, generalized pain, fatigue, cognitive dysfunctions as well as tinnitus. The balance dysfunction in BPPV/canalithiasis is dynamic and not static. This leads to a perpetual postural mismatch. The vicious cycle of a disturbed equilibrium control system may be the driving force behind the vicious cycle of pain. The aim of this study is to investigate if otolith-repositioning manoeuvres in patients with chronic BPPV/canalithiasis can be beneficial. Methods: During a period of about two years a prospective observational study on patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain referred for physiotherapy was performed. Those with a Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) inquiry score above 20 underwent further investigations to diagnose chronic BPPV/canalithiasis. Diagnostic criteria: (A) The diagnosis of BPPV/canalithiasis was confirmed with the following: (1) specific history of vertigo or dizziness provoked by acceleration/deceleration, AND (2) nystagmus and symptoms during at least one of the test positions; (B) the disorder had persisted for at least one year. Specific otolith repositioning manoeuvre for each semi-circular canal (SCC) was performed. Symptom questionnaire ("yes" or "no" answers during a personal interview) and a follow-up questionnaire were used. Results: The responders of the follow-up questionnaire constituted the study group. Thirty-nine patients responded (i.e. 87%) (31 females, 8 males) with a median age of 44 years (17-65). The median duration of the disease was 5 years. Seventy-nine percent had a history of head or neck trauma. The DHI median score was 48 points (score >60 indicates a risk of fall). The video-oculography confirmed BPPV/canalithiasis in more than one semi-circular canal in all patients. In the present study the frequency of affected anterior semi-circular canal (SSC) was at a minimum of 26% and could be as high as 65%. Ninety-five percent suffered from headache, 92% from neck pain, 54% had generalized pain, and 56% had temporo-mandibular joint region pain. Fatigue (97%), aggravation by physical exertion (87%), decreased ability to concentrate (85%) as well as visual disturbances (85%) were the most frequently reported symptoms, and 49% suffered from tinnitus. The median number of otolith repositioning manoeuvres done was six (2-29). Median time span between finishing otolith repositioning manoeuvres and answering the questionnaire was 7 months. Effects of treatment and conclusion: The present study has shown that repositioning of otoliths in the SCCs in nearly all patients with chronic BPPV/canalithiasis ameliorated pain and other symptoms. The correlation between vertigo/dizziness and the majority of symptoms was significant. Therefore, there is strong evidence to suggest that there is a connection between chronic BPPV/canalithiasis and chronic pain as well as the above-mentioned symptoms. Implications: Patients with unexplained pain conditions should be evaluated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory-questionnaire, which can identify treatable balance disorders. © 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 8, 1-7 p.
Keyword [en]
Canalithiasis, Chronic BPPV, Pain, Temporo-mandibular joint region pain, Vertigo, Whiplash
National Category
Nursing Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-4028DOI: 10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.02.002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-4028DiVA: diva2:881723
Note

Export Date: 11 December 2015

Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2016-01-21

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