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End-of-life care in intensive care units: family routines and environmental factors.
Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9828-961X
2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to describe family care routines and to explore environmental factors when patients die in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs). The main research questions were: what are the physical environmental circumstances and facilities when caring for patients in end-of-life and are there any routines or guidelines when caring for dying patients and their families? A questionnaire was sent to 79 eligible Swedish ICUs in December 2003, addressed to the unit managers. The response rate was 94% (n = 74 units). The findings show that, despite recommendations highlighting the importance of privacy for dying ICU patients and their families, only 11% of the respondents stated that patients never died in shared rooms in their ICU. If a patient dies in a shared room, nurses strive to ensure a dignified goodbye by moving the body to an empty room or to one specially designated for this purpose. The majority (76%) of the units had waiting rooms within the ICU. The study also revealed that there is a need for improvements in the follow-up routines for bereaved families. Many units reported (51%) that they often or almost always offer a follow-up visit, although in most cases the bereaved family had to initiate the follow-up by contacting the ICU. Guidelines in the area of end-of-life care were used by 25% of the ICUs. Further research is necessary to acquire a deeper knowledge of the circumstances under which patients die in ICUs and what impact the ICU environment has on bereaved families.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 21, no 1
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-4021DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00470.xPubMedID: 17428211OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-4021DiVA: diva2:881596
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2016-05-12

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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