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The core of social function after solid organ transplantation.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9828-961X
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Social function is a key aspect of health-related quality of life after solid organ transplantation (SOT). The focus of this study was to report how solid organ-transplanted patients change their social function after transplantation.

AIM: To investigate the main concerns associated with social function after SOT and how solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) deal with these concerns.

METHOD: Twenty SOTRs, 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range 22-75 years) and due for their first-year follow-up were included in this study. The informants had received various types of solid organs. Data were collected through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of grounded theory (GT) developed by Charmaz.

RESULT: The GT of this study describes the efforts by the 20 SOTRs to adapt socially in order to maintain their social functioning and leading a normal life. The efforts summaries a process wherein the generated GT is present through three main categories: deconstruction, restriction and reconstruction, showing various ways to socially adapt. Through this process, a clear path of transition through adaptation is evident, starting before transplantation and continues beyond the first year after transplantation.

CONCLUSION: Social functions improved through a process of adaptation during the first year after transplantation. Working and travelling were the two most important aspects of social function. All the informants emphasised the importance of regaining a normal life, which was the outcome of a successful adaptation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-4011DOI: 10.1111/scs.12264ISI: 000383803300004PubMedID: 26395270Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85027929301OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-4011DiVA, id: diva2:881581
Available from: 2015-12-11 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Fridh, Isabell

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