Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Notification card to alert for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus is stigmatizing from patients' point of view
University of Borås, School of Health Science.
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 440-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The importance of alerting health care systems of patients carrying multidrug-resistant bacteria (MRB) is highlighted in numerous guidelines. In the absence of electronic alert systems, notification cards are often recommended, but have rarely been evaluated. We evaluated patient experiences of receiving and using a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) notification card. METHODS: Two cohorts of patients given a card when identified for the first time as a carrier in 1999-2003 and 2008-2010, responded to questionnaires distributed in 2004 and 2011, respectively. The response rate in 2004 was 92 (38 females)/129 and in 2011 was 110 (55 females)/209. In addition, 63% and 49%, respectively, followed the encouragement to provide written comments to the questions. These were analysed using a qualitative method. RESULTS: The patients took responsibility not to infect others, reported high usage, and acknowledged the importance of the card to inform health care institutions about their carrier status, despite experiencing fear, disrespect, lack of knowledge, and unprofessional behaviour when presenting it to personnel. Alarmingly these stigmatizing experiences were more frequent in 2011. Professional behaviour was reported from the infectious disease clinic. A majority of the patients were unaware of how they had acquired MRSA. CONCLUSIONS: The MRSA notification card was felt to stigmatize the patient, which makes its use questionable. Other alert methods need to be developed. Most importantly, the study demonstrates the importance for these patients to meet staff educated about MRB. Thus, there is an urgent need to educate health care professionals at all levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 46, no 6, p. 440-446
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1917DOI: 10.3109/00365548.2014.896029PubMedID: 24669980Local ID: 2320/14272OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1917DiVA, id: diva2:869995
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Lindahl, Berit

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindahl, Berit
By organisation
School of Health Science
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 86 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf