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A phenomenological study of being cared for in a critical care setting: The meanings of the patient room as a place of care.
University of Borås, School of Health Science.
University of Borås, School of Health Science.
University of Borås, School of Health Science.
2013 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 29, no 4, 234-243 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Summary Previous research highlights the impact of care and treatment in ICUs on the patient recovery process and wellbeing. However, little is known about how the interior design in the ICU settings may affect patients’ wellbeing. Objective The aim of this study is, by using a lifeworld perspective, to reveal the meanings of the ICU settings as a place of care. Design Nine patients from three ICUs in Sweden participated. Data were collected using photo-voice methodology and were analysed using a reflective lifeworld phenomenological approach. Results The ICU setting as a place of care for critically ill patients is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. The place is constituted of patients, staff and technical equipment. The struggle for life and occurrences taking place there determine how the room is perceived. The tone and touch of caring together with interior design are fundamental for the room as lived. The room is experienced in various moods; a place of vulnerability, a place inbetween, a place of trust and security, a life-affirming place, a place of tenderness and care and an embodied place. Conclusion Promoting patients’ well-being and satisfaction of care involves integrating a good design and a caring attitude and paying attention to patients’ needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone , 2013. Vol. 29, no 4, 234-243 p.
Keyword [en]
Intensive care units, Patient room, Hospital design, Qualitative studies, Phenomenology
Keyword [sv]
Hållbar vårdutveckling
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1780DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2013.02.002PubMedID: 23727137Local ID: 2320/13245OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1780DiVA: diva2:869849
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2016-11-23Bibliographically approved

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Olausson, SepidehLindahl, BeritEkebergh, Margaretha
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf