Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Prevalence and severity of abnormal glucose regulation and its relation to long-term prognosis after coronary artery bypass grafting.
University of Borås, School of Health Science.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Coronary Artery Disease, ISSN 0954-6928, E-ISSN 1473-5830, Vol. 24, no 7, 577-582 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Diabetes is a strong predictor of a poor outcome after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The prevalence of prediabetes and its impact on the prognosis after CABG is not well described. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence and prognostic impact of the different states of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) after CABG. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this prospective study, we included 244 patients undergoing CABG. An oral glucose tolerance test was used to stratify patients into three groups: normoglycaemia, prediabetes and diabetes. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause mortality and hospitalization for a nonfatal cardiovascular event. RESULTS: Among the patients, 86 (35%) were normoglycaemic and 58 (24%) had prediabetes; 100 (41%) patients had diabetes, of whom 28 (28%) had newly diagnosed diabetes on the basis of oral glucose tolerance test. During a mean follow-up period of 5.3 years, 25% of the study population suffered the primary outcome. There was a successive increase in the primary outcome rate from normoglycaemia through prediabetes to diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.40; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.96; P=0.045). CONCLUSION: With increasing severity of AGR, there is an increasing risk of new cardiovascular events after CABG. AGR is prevalent and predicts a poor outcome after CABG. Systematic screening for AGR seems reasonable to identify these high-risk patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins , 2013. Vol. 24, no 7, 577-582 p.
Keyword [sv]
Vårdutveckling
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1666DOI: 10.1097/MCA.0b013e3283645c94ISI: 000325427900008PubMedID: 23903350Local ID: 2320/13027OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1666DiVA: diva2:869735
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Herlitz, J
By organisation
School of Health Science
In the same journal
Coronary Artery Disease
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 56 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf