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Good Taste vs Good Design: A tug of war in the light of Bling
University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
2012 (English)In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 15, no 2, 185-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Some products are considered ‘bad taste’ and therefore of less value. However, if we focus on what a product does with and for its users, rather than on what a product is, we can disregard superficial statements based on taste and instead get a better understanding of good design. This reasoning is based on the relationship between ‘good taste’ and ‘good design’, terms which are sometimes confused and treated as synonyms. In this article, we explore the tension between ‘good taste’ and ‘good design’ and how designers can use that tension in the design process. We consider ‘good taste’ to be rooted in a subjective context of inherent values, whereas ‘good design’ arises from competence and is based on professional skill. In this paper, ‘bad taste’ is exemplified by products associated with the lifestyles of rap artists and the subculture of bling. Our experience is that bling products often generate strong feelings and opinions and are dismissed by many as ‘bad taste’ because their appearance is incompatible with what is perceived to be ‘good design’. In the context of a course on trends, industrial design students were given the task of exploring how bling products are perceived in everyday life. Their views on bling were compatible with how bling is presented in the media. The students perceived bling products to be far from what is regarded as ‘good taste’ within their own culture. Consequently, they were unable to regard bling as a source of inspiration in their design work. However, when the students began to consider what the product does rather than what it is, they were able to use bling as a source of creativity. What other design opportunities are overlooked by regarding products as being in ‘bad taste’?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berg Publishers , 2012. Vol. 15, no 2, 185-202 p.
Keyword [en]
Design, Industrial design, taste, aesthetic norms, Design theory, Design management
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Philosophy
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (General)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1487DOI: 10.2752/175630612X13258652805095ISI: 000303692400004Local ID: 2320/11926OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1487DiVA: diva2:869544
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13

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Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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