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Increase in survival and bystander CPR in out-of-hospital shockable arrhythmia: bystander CPR and female gender are predictors of improved outcome. Experiences from Sweden in an 18-year perspective
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2011 (English)In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 97, no 17, 1391-1396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Objectives In a national perspective, to describe survival among patients found in ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia witnessed by a bystander and with a presumed cardiac aetiology and answer two principal questions: (1) what are the changes over time? and (2) which are the factors of importance? Design Observational register study. Setting Sweden. Patients All patients included in the Swedish Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Register between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2009 who were found in bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation with a presumed cardiac aetiology. Interventions Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. Main outcome measures Survival to 1 month. Results In all, 7187 patients fulfilled the set criteria. Age, place of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and gender did not change. Bystander CPR increased from 46% to 73%; 95% CI for OR 1.060 to 1.081 per year. The median delay from collapse to defibrillation increased from 12 min to 14 min (p for trend 0.0004). Early survival increased from 28% to 45% (95% CI 1.044 to 1.065) and survival to 1 month increased from 12% to 23% (95% CI 1.058 to 1.086). Strong predictors of early and late survival were a short interval from collapse to defibrillation, bystander CPR, female gender and OHCA outside the home. Conclusion In a long-term perspective in Sweden, survival to 1 month after ventricular fibrillation almost doubled. This was associated with a marked increase in bystander CPR. Strong predictors of outcome were a short delay to defibrillation, bystander CPR, female gender and place of collapse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
B M J Group , 2011. Vol. 97, no 17, 1391-1396 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Integrated Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1439DOI: 10.1136/hrt.2011.222711Local ID: 2320/11792OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1439DiVA: diva2:869496
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13

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Publisher's full texthttp://heart.bmj.com/content/97/17/1391.long

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CiteExportLink to record
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