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Growth tolerance of Zygomycetes Mucor indicus in orange peel hydrolysate without detoxification
University of Borås, School of Engineering.
University of Borås, School of Engineering.
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2012 (English)In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 47, no 5, 836-842 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

The capability of two zygomycetes strains, Mucor indicus and an isolate from tempeh (Rhizopus sp.), to grow on orange peel hydrolysate and their tolerance to its antimicrobial activity, was investigated. Both fungi, in particular M. indicus, tolerated up to 2% d-limonene in semi-synthetic media during cultivation in shake flasks, under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. The tolerance of M. indicus was also tested in a bioreactor, giving rise to varying results in the presence of 2% limonene. Furthermore, both strains were capable of consuming galacturonic acid, the main monomer of pectin, under aerobic conditions when no other carbon source was present. The orange peel hydrolysate was based on 12% (dry w/v) orange peels, containing d-limonene at a concentration of 0.6% (v/v), which no other microorganism has been reported to be able to ferment. However, the hydrolysate was utilised by M. indicus under aerobic conditions, resulting in production of 410 and 400 mg ethanol/g hexoses and 57 and 75 mg fungal biomass/g sugars from cultivations in shake flasks and a bioreactor, respectively. Rhizopus sp., however, was slow to germinate aerobically, and neither of the zygomycetes was able to consistently germinate in orange peel hydrolysate, under anaerobic conditions. The zygomycetes strains used in the present study demonstrated a relatively high resistance to the antimicrobial compounds present in orange peel hydrolysate, and they were capable of producing ethanol and biomass in the presence of limonene, particularly when cultivated with air supply.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd , 2012. Vol. 47, no 5, 836-842 p.
Keyword [en]
zygomycetes, mucor indicus, ethanol, orange peel, d-limonene
Keyword [sv]
Energi och material
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Resource Recovery
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1279DOI: 10.1016/j.procbio.2012.02.019ISI: 000303622400021Local ID: 2320/10786OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1279DiVA: diva2:869303
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2016-09-28Bibliographically approved

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Lennartsson, PatrikYlitervo, PäiviTaherzadeh, Mohammad
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