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Psychosocial work conditions, pereived stress, perceived muscular tension, and neck/shoulder symptoms among medical secretaries
University of Borås, School of Engineering. (MedTech West)
2013 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
The content falls within the scope of Sustainable Development
Abstract [en]

Purpose Unfavorable psychosocial working conditions are hypothesized to lead to perceived stress, which, in turn, can be related to an increased risk of development of neck/shoulder symptoms through increased and sustained muscle activation. The aim of the present study was to test this hypothesized process model among medical secretaries, a female-dominated profession characterized by a high amount of visual display unit use and a high prevalence of neck/shoulder symptoms. Methods In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire survey was conducted among medical secretaries ( n = 200). The proposed process model was tested using a path model framework. Results The results indicate that high work demands were related to high perceived stress, which in turn was related to a high perceived muscle tension and neck/shoulder symptoms. Low influence at work was not related to perceived stress, but was directly related to a high perceived muscle tension. Conclusions In general, these cross-sectional results lend tentative support for the hypothesis that adverse psychosocial work conditions (high work demands) may contribute to the development of neck/shoulder symptoms through the mechanism of stress-induced sustained muscular activation. This process model needs to be further tested in longitudinal studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer , 2013. Vol. 86, no 1, p. 57-63
Keywords [en]
neck/shoulder symptoms, medical secretaries, psychosocial work environment, perceived stress, perceived muscular tension
Keywords [sv]
Arbetsvetenskap
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-1268DOI: 10.1007/s00420-012-0744-xISI: 000313012900007PubMedID: 22327878Local ID: 2320/10551OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-1268DiVA, id: diva2:869292
Available from: 2015-11-13 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-02Bibliographically approved

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Sandsjö, Leif

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  • nn-NO
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