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Room Design - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Study: A Factor in Creating a Caring Environment.
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. (Vårdande i högteknologiska miljöer)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7400-6574
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9828-961X
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0047-9723
2019 (English)In: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, ISSN 0887-9303, E-ISSN 1550-5111, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 265-277, article id 31135477Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Medical technology has progressed tremendously over the last few decades, but the same development cannot be seen in the design of these intensive care unit environments. Authors report results of a study of evidence-based room design, emphasizing the impact on conveying a caring attitude to patients. Ten nonparticipant observations were conducted in patient rooms with 2 different designs, followed by interviews. The data were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach. The results did not reveal that it was obvious that redesigned spaces resulted in a more caring attitude. The meanings of caring displayed during nursing activities were interpreted by interpreting gazes. Some of the nursing staff had an instrumental gaze, interpreted as caring with a task-orientated approach, while others communicated their caring with an attentive and attuned gaze, where the needs of the patients regulated the working shift. The study findings indicated that caring may not be perceived when nurses use a task-oriented approach. However, when nurses practice a person-centered approach, using an attentive and attuned gaze, caring is conveyed. Caring in intensive care contexts needs to be assisted by a supportive environment design that cultivates the caring approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: Wolters Kluwer, 2019. Vol. 42, no 3, p. 265-277, article id 31135477
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Människan i vården
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21134DOI: 10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000267OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-21134DiVA, id: diva2:1319334
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969Available from: 2019-05-31 Created: 2019-05-31 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Sundberg, FredrikaFridh, IsabellOlausson, SepidehLindahl, Berit

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