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The meanings of comfort in intensive care settings: the fusion of care and interior design revealed through a lexical and content analysis
Göteborgs Universitet. (Vårdande i högteknologiska miljöer)
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. (Vårdande i högteknologiska miljöer)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9828-961X
University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. (Vårdande i högteknologiska miljöer)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0047-9723
Norges Naturvetenskapliga och Tekniska Universitet (NTNU). (Vårdande i högteknologiska miljöer)
2019 (English)In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, ISSN 0887-9303, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 329-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Sustainable development
According to the author(s), the content of this publication falls within the area of sustainable development.
Abstract [en]

Providing comfort in an ICU setting is often related to pain relief and end-of-life care; environmental factors are often neglected, despite the major role of the environment on the patients’ wellbeing and comfort. The aim of this paper is to explore the meanings of comfort from a theoretical and empirical perspective to increase the understanding of what comfort means in ICU settings. A lexical analysis and serials of workshops were performed, and data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The findings from the theoretical analysis show that comfort has a broad range of synonyms related both to subjective experiences and objective and physical qualities. The findings from the empirical part reveal four themes: comfort in relation to nature, comfort in relation to situation and people, comfort in relation to place and comfort in relation to objects and material. Materiality, functionality, memory, culture and history stipulate comfort. It is challenging to discern what comfort is when it comes to an individual’s function and emotions. We also found that comfort is closely linked to nature and wellbeing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 42, no 3, p. 329-341
Keywords [en]
Patients’ rooms, health facilities, seminars and workshops, lexical analysis, content analysis
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21044DOI: 10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000268ISI: 000474247200013Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85066935080OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-21044DiVA, id: diva2:1317076
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-969Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2020-01-29Bibliographically approved

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The full text will be freely available from 2020-10-01 10:49
Available from 2020-10-01 10:49

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Fridh, IsabellLindahl, Berit

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