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Zero Waste Design Thinking
University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3210-1696
2019 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic) [Artistic work]
Sustainable development
According to the author(s), the content of this publication falls within the area of sustainable development.
Abstract [en]

The fashion system is contributing to the environmental and social crises on an ever increasing scale. The industry must transform in order to situate itself within the environmental and social limits proposed by economist Kate Raworth, and the 17 sustainable development goals set out by the United Nations. This research explored methods of eliminating textile waste through utilising zero waste pattern cutting to expand the outcomes possible within industrial contexts and speculates as to the implications for the wider industry and society. Employing an experimental and phenomenological approach, this thesis outlines the testing of known strategies in the context of industry and responds with new emergent strategies to the challenges that arose. A series of interviews were conducted with designers who have applied zero-waste fashion design in an industry context – both large and small scale – to unpack the strategies used and contextualise the difficulties faced. The findings that emerged from the iterative design practice and the experience of working within the field tests inform the surrounding discussions and reflections. This reflection brings into sharp relief the inherent conflicts that exist within the fashion system and has led to the development of a series of theoretical models.The implications for design and industry are broad. Firstly that while this thesis outlines garment design strategies, and broader – company-wide – approaches that can work to reduce waste in a given context, this research finds that a holistic transformation of the internal design and management processes of the industry is required for them to be successful. In response, theoretical models have been developed which seek to articulate the constraints, roles and actions of design within broader company practices, while contextualising these within the economic system it operates. It is clear that reducing waste will only have a minor positive effect on the environmental outcomes unless we also reduce consumption of raw materials through reducing yield or reducing consumption – ideally both. These findings and models point towards a necessary recalibration of the industry as a whole – small changes are not enough as the existing methods, processes and ethos are deeply embedded, and its agents are resistant to change. The results concur with previous research and conclude that a fundamental shift in thinking is required – one that prioritises a different set of constraints to those the industry and society currently focus on – in order to make the rapid and meaningful change necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Högskolan i Borås, 2019. , p. 277
Series
University of Borås studies in artistic research ; 29
Keywords [en]
zero waste design, sustainable design, circular economy, fashion design, circular design
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21026ISBN: 978-91-88838-33-9 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hb-21026DiVA, id: diva2:1316575
Presentation
2019-06-12, T378b, 10:07 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Make/Use:: A System for Open Source, User-Modifiable, Zero Waste Fashion Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Make/Use:: A System for Open Source, User-Modifiable, Zero Waste Fashion Practice
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Fashion Practice: the journal of design, creative process & the fashion industry, ISSN 1756-9370, E-ISSN 1756-9389, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 7-33Article in journal (Refereed) [Artistic work] Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses Make/Use, a multi-disciplinary research project exploring “User Modifiable Zero Waste Fashion”. In particular, it addresses the use of textile print and a parametric matrix to facilitate the cognitive and creative processes involved in the transformation from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) form. The Make/Use project centers on the development and testing of an embedded navigational system by which users can formulate a functional understanding of the form and construction of a garment and its opportunities for manipulation. It questions how the encoding of navigational clues and markers into a garment might aid in its facility for creation and modification by the user, aiming to enhance emotional investment and connection, and extending its functional life by providing embedded opportunities for alteration and visible repair.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
zero waste fashion, textile print, wayshowing, use practice, open source, matrix, sustainable fashion
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-13909 (URN)10.1080/17569370.2017.1400320 (DOI)000436283600002 ()2-s2.0-85041187461 (Scopus ID)
Note

The research for this work took place while I was a researcher at Massey University, the article was published while an employee at the University of Borås.

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
2. Waste, so What?: A reflection on waste and the role of designers in a circular economy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waste, so What?: A reflection on waste and the role of designers in a circular economy.
2019 (English)In: Nordic Design Research Journal., 2019, Vol. 8Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses research currently being undertaken which addresses the interrelated volume, value and cost of waste and the responsibility designers have in their creation. The paper beginning by outlining the contemporary waste problem (in the fashion industry). Then utilizing observations made during recent field tests - where waste reduction and elimination were applied to existing designs - the impact that explicit and implicit design hierarchies and complexity have on waste minimization attempts are discussed. Questions such as: is waste a problem in the context of proposed circular economy models? After all, if we have a circular economy, then any waste we make can be put back into the cycle. So, will the CE let designers (and industry) off the hook? Lastly, I speculate as to what a fashion industry without waste might look like, discussing my design response to the issues raised.

Keywords
waste, textile, fashion, zero waste design, composite garment weaving, circular economy, circular design
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21028 (URN)
Conference
NORDES 2019: WHO CARES?, Aalto, June 2-4, 2019.
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved
3. Hybrid zero waste design practices.: Zero waste pattern for composite garment weaving and its implications
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hybrid zero waste design practices.: Zero waste pattern for composite garment weaving and its implications
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This practice-based design research explores methods of eliminating textile waste through utilising zero waste pattern cutting to expand the outcomes possible through composite garment weaving and speculates as to the implications for the wider industry and society. Employing a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, I tested known strategies in the context of industry and responded with new emergent strategies to the challenges that arose. The findings that emerged from the iterative design practice, and surrounding discussions and reflections, inform the experimental design work that follows. It is this experimental ‘future-making’ that is the focus of this paper, which outlines foundational pattern cutting theory and methods for an emerging field – composite garment weaving – as well as findings relating to the impact and use of technology in the fashion industry while bringing into sharp relief the inherent conflicts that exist within the fashion system.

Keywords
Zero waste design, Composite garment weaving, Technology, Circular design, Sustainable fashion
National Category
Design
Research subject
Textiles and Fashion (Design)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hb:diva-21031 (URN)
Conference
Running with Scissors, 13th EAD Conference, Dundee, 10 - 12 April, 2019.
Available from: 2019-05-20 Created: 2019-05-20 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved

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